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Making friends with childhood anxiety: an early intervention. Presenters: Ms Jemona Mostert Dr Helene Loxton Department of Psychology, Stellenbosch University. Introduction. • Motivation for the study

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making friends with childhood anxiety an early intervention

Making friends with childhood anxiety: an early intervention

Presenters:

Ms Jemona Mostert

Dr Helene Loxton

Department of Psychology, Stellenbosch University

introduction
Introduction
  • • Motivation for the study

 Literature suggest a high prevalence of anxiety symptoms among South African youth (inter alia Burkhardt, Loxton, & Muris, 2003 ; Muris, Schmidt, Engelbrecht, & Perold, 2002)

 Yet, an early intervention- and prevention programme is lacking

  • • Aims of the study

 To investigate the effectiveness of a CBT early intervention- and prevention programme in a sample of middle childhood children

method
Method
  • • Research Design
  •  Quasi-experimental design: non-equivalent waitlist- comparison group
  • • Sampling
  •  ad hoc sample of 12-year-old (M=12.6, SD=9.12) children
  • • Participants
  •  66 children (30 girls, 36 boys) from a local school at Stellenbosch, in in a formerly disadvantaged neighbourhood
slide4
• Measures
  •  Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale (SCAS)
  • (Spence, 1997)
  •  Revised Children’s Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS) (Reynolds, & Richmond, 1978)
  • • Time Line
  •  Time 1: pre-intervention assessment
  •  Rx : Intervention group
  •  Time 2: post-intervention assessment
  •  Time 3: post-intervention follow-up
  •  Rx : Waitlist-comparison group
  •  Time 4: post-intervention assessment
intervention programme
Intervention Programme
  • • Motivation for FRIENDS programme
  • research based (Barrett, & Turner, 2001)
  •  child-friendliness
  • • FRIENDS programme (Barrett, 2004)
  •  F = Feeling worried?
  • R = Relax and feel good
  • I = Inner thoughts
  • E = Exploring plans
  • N = Nice work – reward yourself!
  • D = Don’t forget to practise
  • S = Stay calm!
results
Results
  • • Between group effects (n=46) (oneway ANOVA)
  •  Time 1: SCAS: F(1,44) = 0.27 p = 1.00
  • RCMAS: F(1,44) = 0.55, p = 1.00
  •  Time 2: SCAS: F(1,44) = 0.01, p = 1.00
  • RCMAS: F(1,44) = 0.83, p = 1.00
  •  Time 3: SCAS: F(1,44) = 2.25, p = .56
  • RCMAS: F(1,44) = 1.42, p = .96
  •  Time 4: SCAS: F(1,44) = 0.07, p = 1.00
  • RCMAS: F(1,44) = 0.23, p = 1.00
slide7
• Within group effects (n=46) (repeated measures
  • ANOVA)
  •  Significant effect for time within the intervention
  • group: F(2.61) = 10.84, p = .00
  • Post Hoc: from Time 3 onward (4-months post-
  • intervention)
  •  No significant effect for time within the waitlist- comparison group: F(1.87) = 1.36, p = .27
implications
Implications

• Need for an early intervention and prevention programme

• CBT principles are appropriate for middle childhood children

• Australian FRIENDS program

 cost effectiveness?

• Options?

 collaboration and adaption of established programmes?

 own program, relevant to the South African context?

 alternatives?

references
References

Barrett, P.M. (2004). FRIENDS for life: Group leaders’ manual. Bowen Hills, Australia: Australian Academic Press.

Barrett, P.M., & Turner, C.M. (2001). Prevention of anxiety symptoms in primary school children: Preliminary results from a universal school-based trial. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 40, 399-410.

Burkhardt, K., Loxton, H.S., & Muris, P. (2003). Fears and fearfulness in South-African children. Behaviour Change, 20(2), 94-102.

slide10
Muris, P., Schmidt, H., Engelbrecht, P., & Perold, M. (2002). DSM-IV defined anxiety disorder symptoms in South African children. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 41, 1360-1368.
  • Reynolds, C.R., & Richmond, B.O. (1978). What I think and feel: A revised measure of children’s manifest anxiety. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 6, 271-280.
  • Spence, S.H. (1997). Structure of anxiety symptoms among children: A confirmatory factor analytic study. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 106(2), 280-297.
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