All you ever wanted to know about g4 visas and i 94 forms
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All You Ever Wanted to Know About G4 Visas and I-94 Forms. Presentation for OAS Interns June 12, 2008 Christine Dutko Intern, Department of Human Resources: Compensation and Benefits. Why is this information important?.

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All You Ever Wanted to Know About G4 Visas and I-94 Forms

Presentation for OAS Interns

June 12, 2008

Christine Dutko

Intern, Department of Human Resources:

Compensation and Benefits


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Why is this information important?

  • This group includes 109 individual interns, out of which 52 hold a G4 visa, almost 48% of the group. Moreover, all foreign nationals should have received I-94 forms upon entering the US.

    • 21 interns hold F-1 visas.

  • Moreover, a majority of the staff members and consultants of the OAS also hold G4 visas and have I-94 forms. They are thus affected by the same regulations and restrictions as the interns.


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Visas: General Information

  • Visas: Holding a visa signifies that a US official has decided that you are eligible to enter the country to perform a specific duty (work, study, travel, etc.) for which you have solicited entry.

    • The visa states when you can enter the US and how many times.

  • Immigrant Visas-Visas for people hoping to become US citizens and remain indefinitely in the US

    • Relatives of US citizens, adopted children of US citizens

  • Nonimmigrant Visas-Those who plan to temporarily live in the US

    • Ambassadors, workers, interns, students, visitors

    • Nonimmigrants agree to maintain a permanent residence in the country they are coming from that they have no intention of abandoning while they are in the US.


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Application Process

  • First, call the US embassy in your country and find out if you need to make an appointment for the interview or for turning in your visa application.

  • Visa Application

  • Interview (often waived for G visas)

  • Payment (waived for G visas)

  • Passport valid for at least six months after intended travel

  • Diplomatic note from the International Organization for which you are working

  • Once a visa has been successfully obtained, it DOES NOT guarantee entry-it only means that an official has deemed the holder eligible to enter the country.


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What is a G4 Visa?

  • According to the US Citizenship and Immigration Services, nonimmigrant G visas are for “Foreign Government Officials to International Organizations”

    • G4-Visa: Visa for an “International Organization officer or employee, and members of immediate family”

  • Allows employees of International Organizations (IOs) to enter the US and stay there legally as long as they are employed by the organization

    • Not for personal business or pleasure

  • Interns working at the Washington offices of the OAS who are foreign nationals must have a valid G4 visa unless they are already in the on an F1 student visa or are permanent residents.

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Passport

Visa


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I-94

The departure record, this small white form, is what an immigration officer returned to you when you entered the country. If this form is not already stapled into your passport, please do so yourself opposite the page with your visa.

Front

Back


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I-94: The Important Part

  • This form shows when you arrived in the US and the date by which you should depart.

  • In the case of OAS interns, the departure date is shown by D/S, or duration of status. This means you can legally stay in the US as long as you are employed by the organization that helped request your visa.

    • Only refer to this form for the permitted length of stay in the US, NOT the visa

  • This form should remain stapled in your passport and please try not to lose the document-it is difficult to replace.


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Limitations

*Beware*

  • G-4 visa holders are only permitted to work (or in your case intern) with the organization with which they are registered. The G4 visa DOES NOT allow you to take on any additional paid employment with a business that is not the OAS. F1 visa holders also cannot take on paid work, either within or apart from the OAS.

  • You are not required to state a foreign residence to which you plan to return. However, once you are done with the internship at OAS (August 15 for most interns), the organization will terminate your visa. After this, you have 30 days to leave the country.

  • Staying beyond the permitted duration of time will cause you to be out-of-status with the Department of Homeland Security and will hinder any future applications for visas to the US.


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What if I Get a Job Anyway?

  • If the US government finds that a G4 Visa holder has paid employment apart from their work with the OAS, the individual will be found to be in violation of their visa agreement and thus the government may deport that individual. The OAS cannot do anything to help an individual in this situation.

    • Note: F1 (student) visa holders should also refrain from getting a job apart from their internship.


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What Must I Do Now That I Have Arrived in the US?

  • Make copies of all important documents: passport photo page, visa, I-94 form (both sides) for both yourself and the OAS

    • Give one copy of each item to me  office 430, ext. 3693

    • Note: Permanent residents of the US should also make a copy of both sides of their US-issued identification if they have not done so already.

  • Do not worry about registering with the Department of State-the Department of Human Resources will do this. If you would like, register with your home country’s embassy.

  • DO NOT lose your I-94 form. This is the actual document that attests to your legal presence in the US.

    • Also, take care of your passport. You will need it to leave the US and get home.


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What happens when the internship ends?

  • When the internship ends, the Department of Human Resources will terminate your work agreement and visa status with the Department of State.

    • After this date, you have 30 days to leave the country. If you are here for the normal internship period, your contract will be terminated on August 15, meaning you must leave the US before September 15, 2008.

  • Upon exiting the country by air or sea, leave your I-94 form with an airline or ship representative. If you are driving out of the US, find an immigration official to give the form to.

    • Failure to submit your I-94 form may hinder future visa applications.


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Want to Extend Your Stay?

  • Your contract with the OAS will end on August 15 unless otherwise stated. G4 visa holders have a 30-day period, until September 15, in which you must leave the country. If you stay longer than 30 days, you will be in violation of your visa agreement. There is a 3- to 10-year bar on future entry into the US if you remain here beyond the authorized period of stay.

  • Refer to Rules #10 and #11 in the Internship Agreement

30 Days ONLY!


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To Reiterate Main Points:

  • I-94: Important

    • D/S: Duration of Status

  • You cannot hold another job

  • 30 days to leave the country after internship period

  • Turn in the I-94 form when leaving country


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Q & A

  • What if I lose my passport with my visa and my I-94?

    • Immediately file a police report. You will also need to contact me or Department of Human Resources (DHR): Compensation and Benefits to help you get new documentation.

  • What if I never got an I-94 form?

    • Contact me or DHR: Compensation and Benefits to assist you with getting a form.

  • What if my visa expires after my internship ends?

    • This does not matter. Your I-94 form should say D/S meaning that you cannot stay longer than the 30 days after your internship ends. Even though your visa may give date months after the internship ends, this does not apply to when you must depart.

  • What if my I-94 form has a date instead of D/S?

    • You will need to contact me or DHR: Compensation and Benefits to assist you with changing the date to D/S.


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Additional Questions?

  • If you have any additional questions, feel free to contact me:

    • Office: 430 (opposite Betty Arevalo’s office), Department of Human Resources

    • Extension: 3693

    • E-mail: DHR Intern 7 (Dutko, Christine) once you are in the OAS network

    • If I cannot answer a question, I can refer it to the Compensation and Benefits team.

  • My contact information, as well as a copy of this presentation, will be available in the upcoming intern newsletter.

  • Please do not forget to give me a copy of your passport, visa, and I-94 form!!



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