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Imperialism: Japan/China

Imperialism: Japan/China

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Imperialism: Japan/China

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  1. Deannex TechBoy Add/edit slides as you please, just make sure they're in order Imperialism: Japan/China • by Dean Sarigumba, Matthew Kiely, • Sachit Sunil, and Sagar Rawal

  2. China: Spheres of Influence • An area in which another nation has power of the native country SR

  3. China: How are Spheres Formed? • Previous wars in China by the British and French weakened China’s power • China attempts to ban • the sale of Opium, but • Britain refuses and • fights China & wins • securing ports for trade • China by late 1880’s is • viewed as weak SR

  4. China: Prelude to Spheres • China attempts to control Korea, in the Sino-Japanese war with Japan • Korea is a good natural harbor for trade • Assertion of Chinese power to West • China loses war • China forced by stronger • countries to open ports SR

  5. China: The Struggle is Real • Because of China’s failed wars • Forced to open ports in the treaties of wars lost • Loses over 50 of its sea-ports • Countries include • Russia • Japan • Germany • Great Britain • European countries divide China into “Spheres of Influence” • The foreign countries basically run those areas SR

  6. Preface to the Open Door Policy • China loses Sino-Japanese War • America wins Spanish-American War • America interested • in China • MK

  7. Creation of the Open Door Policy • Written in 1899 by William W. Rockhill • Provided: • Free access to ports • Only Chinese government could collect taxes on trades • No one gets exemptions from paying dues/charges • MK

  8. Acceptance of Open Door Policy • Sent to Great Britain, Russia, Germany, Italy, France, and Japan by Secretary of State John Hay • All powers attempted to avoid it, but it was eventually “accepted” in 1900 • MK

  9. Events Effecting Open Door Policy • Boxer Rebellion • Second set of notes • Russo-Japanese War • Land Takeover • MK • MK

  10. Boxer Rebellion - Where and What it is SS • Officially supported peasant uprising of 1900 that attempted to drive all foreigners from China • “Boxers” was the term foreigners gave to the Chinese Group Yihequan (Righteous and Harmonious Fists) • Group practiced certain boxing and rituals that made others believe they were invulnerable

  11. Boxer Rebellion - How and Why SS • Offshoot of the Eight Trigrams Society (Baguajiao) • They had many rebellions against the Qing Dynasty • The Boxers aim was to rid of the Qing Dynasty and the Westerners • Boxers first increased their power in Northern China due to economic impoverishment, aggression, and more

  12. Boxer Rebellion - Joining Hands SS • They stopped going against the Dynasty and joined hands to defeat the foreigners • Christian Converts provoked them; by late 1899 Boxers were openly attacking the Chinese Christians and Western Missionaries • In Beijing the Boxers burned churches and killed Christians on sight • By 1900 they were more than a 100,000 strong and were led by Tzu’u Hzi

  13. Boxer Rebellion - Freedom SS • The German minister was murdered and many foreigners were held hostage in the Roman Catholic Cathedral in Beijing • On August 14, 1900, an international force came to Beijing and freed all the foreigners being held hostage • The Dynasty had fallen and the Boxer Rebellion had failed • Foreign troops were permanently placed and China was forced to pay $333 Million as a penalty for the Rebellion

  14. Japanese Imperialism (1894-1910) DS • Reasons for Expansion: • Respect from Western countries • Military security • Resources for industrialization • Overpopulation on mainland • Markets • Countries expanded into (reasons): • Korea (raw materials, farmland, security) • China (raw materials, market, farmland) • Hokkaido (farmland, lumber) • Okinawa (resources, security)

  15. Events Leading to the Russo-Japanese War DS • Sino-Japanese War • Forced Japan to relinquish the • Liaotung Peninsula • Russia gains Port Arthur • (at the tip of the Peninsula) • Russia allies with China • against Japan • Builds the Trans-Siberian Railroad Manchuria-Vladivostok • Russia withdraws its troops from Manchuria (NE China) in 1903

  16. Russo-Japanese War: Initiation DS • (Feb. 8th, 1904) Japan • attacks Port Arthur • (March - May) Japanese • forces land in Korea/Liaotung • Peninsula • (June 14th and August 25th) • Russia loses battles at Fu-hsien and Liao-yung respectively • Cause Russian forces to retreat north to Mukden

  17. Russo-Japanese War: Falling Action DS • (Jan. 2nd, 1905) Port Arthur is besieged, Russian commander surrenders the fort • (Feb. - Mar., 1905) Russian troops in Mukden are defeated • (May 27th - 28th, 1905) Russian Baltic Fleet is defeated in the Tsushima Strait on it’s way to the Peninsula • (Aug. 9th - Sept. 5th, 1905) Peace conference held • Mediated by Pres. Theodore Roosevelt, held at Portsmouth, NH, U.S. • Japan gains Peninsula, Port Arthur, South Manchurian Railroad, half of Sakhalin Island • Russia evacuates Manchuria, restored to China • Japan’s control over Korea is recognized

  18. Imperialism At its Finest China + Japan Dean Sarigumba Sachit Sunil Matt Kiely Sagar Rawal