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Working Together to Save Lives An Introduction to the FHWA Safety Program for FHWA’s Safety Partners. The Death Toll on American Highways is Not Acceptable!. Every 12 minutes someone is killed on American highways. The daily death toll from vehicle-related crashes is 120.

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

Working Together

to Save Lives

An Introduction to the

FHWA Safety Program

for

FHWA’s Safety Partners

the death toll on american highways is not acceptable
The Death Toll on American Highwaysis Not Acceptable!
  • Every 12 minutes someone is killed on American highways.
  • The daily death toll from vehicle-related crashes is 120.
  • 42,642 crash fatalities were reported in 2006, a rate of 1.42 per 100 million VMT.
if we keep doing what we are doing we ll keep getting what we re getting
If We Keep Doing What We are Doing, We’ll Keep Getting What We’re Getting
  • Seat Belt and Drunk Driving Enforcement and Education drove a steady reduction in the fatality rate, from 1.73 per 100 million VMT in 1996 to 1.44 in 2004.
  • Since 2004, the fatality rate has remained relatively steady. The rate ticked upward to 1.45 in 2005; down to 1.42 in 2006.
  • As VMT increases, fatality numbers will increase, unless we do more.
to save lives we must partner
To Save Lives, We Must Partner
  • We will all benefit from reducing the highway death toll.
  • No single organization or agency can reduce roadway fatalities alone.
  • Together, we can develop solutions.
  • Comprehensive highway safety programs include the 4 “E’s”—Engineering, Education, Enforcement, and Emergency Medical Services (EMS).
what is the fhwa safety program
What is the FHWA Safety Program?

The “FHWA SAFETY PROGRAM” includes:

  • FHWA Office of Safety (Headquarters).
  • FHWA Resource Center-Safety and Design Team.
  • Turner-Fairbank Office of Safety Research.
  • FHWA Division Offices.

We work closely with our DOT modal partners:

  • National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
  • Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.
what is the fhwa safety program s core mission
What is the FHWA Safety Program’sCore Mission?

“Safe Roads for a Safer Future”

  • Core Mission (“it’s what we do”).
  • Fourth “E” in roadway safety, and often overlooked.
  • Improve the safety of roadway infrastructure –
      • Through design and engineering improvements.
      • Speed management improvements.
  • Key element in a comprehensive roadway safety program.
what does the fhwa safety program provide
What Does theFHWA Safety Program Provide?

The FHWA Safety Program provides customers with information, tools and other resources including:

  • Targeted Programs.
  • Road Safety Research.
  • Technology Development.
  • Technology Transfer.
  • Training.
  • Technical Assistance.
focus on fatality facts
Focus on Fatality Facts
  • Fundamental Strategy (“it’s how we do what we do”).
  • Data-driven, strategic approach.
  • Focus on implementing countermeasures to prevent most deadly types of crashes.
fhwa targeted safety programs
FHWA Targeted Safety Programs
  • Roadway Departure Crashes—58%

of fatalities.

  • Intersection Crashes—21% of fatalities.
  • Pedestrian Deaths—11% of fatalities.
  • Speed-Related Crashes—32% of fatalities.
  • Comprehensive Strategic Planning.

Fatality data based on NHTSA FARS 2006 Annual Report file.

how can we work together to prevent roadway departure crashes
How Can We Work Together to Prevent Roadway Departure Crashes?
  • Identify and correct deficiencies in roadside safety.
  • Install countermeasures to prevent vehicles from leaving the roadway.
  • Install countermeasures to prevent vehicles from overturning or striking objects when they leave the roadway.
  • Install countermeasures to minimize injuries and fatalities when overturn occurs or when objects are struck in the roadside.
how can we work together to prevent intersection crashes
How Can We Work Together to Prevent Intersection Crashes?
  • Conduct comprehensive intersection analyses.
    • Evaluate a targeted set of intersections.
  • Budget for improvements. For example:
    • Signalization.
    • Signage.
    • Pavement marking.
    • Channelization or turn lanes.
how can we work together to prevent pedestrian related crashes
How Can We Work Together To Prevent Pedestrian-Related Crashes?
  • Young children and teenagers, and older people (over 65) have higher rates of pedestrian fatality.
  • A comprehensive, 4-E’s approach is the solution: Engineering, Education, Enforcement, and EMS.
  • Pedestrian safety should be part of a systematic approach to community safety, including:
    • Increasing awareness of pedestrian safety issues.
    • Providing pedestrian safety training.
    • Improving roadway designs to more safely accommodate pedestrian needs.
    • Advocate pedestrian safety planning.
how can we work together to prevent speed related crashes
How Can We WorkTogether to Prevent Speed-Related Crashes?
  • Speeding is a complex issue involving engineering, driving behavior, education, and enforcement.
  • Solutions require teamwork among law enforcement, EMS, community leaders, educators and policymakers.
  • Solutions involve:
    • Setting and enforcing realistic speed limits.
    • Aggressive driver education and enforcement.
    • Installing countermeasures such as:
      • Traffic calming devices.
      • Electronic speed surveillance and enforcement.
how can we work together to develop comprehensive strategic plans
How Can We Work Together to Develop Comprehensive Strategic Plans?
  • Strategic Highway Safety Plans (SHSPs) are a major part of the core Highway Safety Improvement Program.
    • Statewide document.
    • Developed by DOT through collaborative process with safety stakeholders.
    • Data-driven, 4-5 year comprehensive plan.
    • Integrate 4-E’s—engineering, education, enforcement, and EMS.
  • Purpose of SHSP:
    • Identify State’s key safety needs.
    • Guide investment decisions.
    • Achieve significant reductions in highway fatalities and serious injuries.
action items for you to consider
Action Items for You to Consider
  • FHWA is committed to working with our Road Safety Partners to enable us all to make America’s highways safer.
  • Actions for you to consider:
    • Promote Comprehensive Strategic Planning.
    • Promote partnerships to leverage safety resources.
    • Promote use of FHWA safety tools and resources.
    • Provide feedback.
let s work together to save lives
Let’s Work Together to Save Lives
  • The FHWA seeks stronger and broader partnerships for Road Safety.
  • The FHWA is always open to your input.
  • Let us know about your concerns and needs.
  • Please give us feedback on how our products and services can be more helpful and effective.
for more information
For More Information

FHWA State Division Offices

http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/field.html

FHWA Resource Center Safety & Design Team

Phone 708 283-3595

http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/resourcecenter/index.htm

FHWA Office of Safety Research and Development

Phone 202 493-3260

http://www.tfhrc.gov/safety/index.htm

FHWA Office of Safety, Headquarters

Phone 202-366-2288

http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov

FHWA Safety Program Web Site

http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov