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Please do not talk at this time Nov. 26. HW: Do Cornell Notes for as far as we get today, 283 -284. . Please set up a new piece of paper for Cornell Notes. Title: Industrial Revolution Part 1 Cornell Notes, Pg. 64A

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please do not talk at this time nov 26
Please do not talk at this time Nov. 26

HW: Do Cornell Notes for as far as we get today, 283 -284.

Please set up a new piece of paper for Cornell Notes.

Title: Industrial Revolution Part 1 Cornell Notes, Pg. 64A

I am going to give you the Left Side of these notes for the Front Page which we will use in class during class notes.

You have 1 min 30 sec. to set up your paper.

slide2

The

Industrial

Revolution

By: Ms. Susan M. PojerHorace Greeley HS Chappaqua, NY

why did industrialization begin in england first
Why did Industrialization Begin in England First?

Answer: England had the Factors of Production.

Lots of Food (from the Agricultural Revolution)

People (living longer and having more babies with all that food)

Natural Resources (rich iron, tin, copper deposits, grazing land for sheep, forests for wood, etc.)

Power Sources (coal, wood, natural gas)

Transportation (first canals, then railroads and always ships)

Free from war and strife (Napoleon is stopped by Nelson

slide4

Agricultural Revolution

Enclosure Movement + Fertilizer + New Crops (potato, turnip, corn) +

!?!

Wheat

Clover

Seed

Turnips

Population Growth

Crop Rotation that renews the soil

Seed Drill that puts seeds out of bird’s reach

+

please do not talk at this time nov 27
Please do not talk at this time Nov. 27

HW: Do Cornell Notes for as far as we get today, 283 -284.

Part 1 Cornell Notes due Wed/Thurs.

Please Get out your Cornell Notes.

Title: Industrial Revolution Part 1 Cornell Notes, Pg. 64A

slide6

Factors of Production-Those resources you need to build a working factory

Coal, Metals, Woolens, & Canals

  • England has all the necessary Natural Resources
  • People to work
  • Coal for Fuel
  • Metals to Build Machines
  • Canals for Transportation
  • Wool for Raw Materials
slide7

Coalfields & Industrial Areas

Why are the coal fields and the industrial areas usually in the same place?

How do you explain the location of London so far from any coal fields?

slide8

Coal Mining in Britain:1800-1914

Why would coal mining go Down between 1880 and 1914?

slide10

Child Labor in the Mines

Child “hurriers”

natural resources sheep
The Industrial Revolution Started with the Textile Industry which makes cloth.

This cloth was made from British wool.

Britain looks like this….

Natural Resources- Sheep

There are lots of fields to raise sheep in.

So there is lots of wool available to turn into cloth.

The more cloth, the more money you can make.

slide12

Transportation!

Natural Resources like Iron provide the Backbone for the Industrial Revolution

  • British Pig Iron Production
  • The pig iron is used to make Steel
  • Steel is used to make all these things:
  • Factory Machines
  • Trains
  • Rail Lines
  • Cargo ships
slide13

Early Canals- Water Highways

Canals make transporting goods to market easy and inexpensive.

slide14

Factors of Production-Those resources you need to build a working factory

Coal, Metals, Woolens, & Canals

  • England has all the necessary Natural Resources
  • People to work
  • Coal for Fuel
  • Metals to Build Machines
  • Canals for Transportation
  • Wool for Raw Materials
slide15

Please do not talk at this time Nov. 28/29

HW: Finish your James Burke Video Handout for Friday

Please turn in your IR Cornell Notes Part 1 to the turn in box.

Please get a Factory and Marketplace Revolution Handout, Pg 65A.

who is james burke
Who is James Burke?

Born: 22 December 1936 (age 75)

Derry, Northern Ireland

Nationality: British

Education: Oxford University

Known for: Connections, The Day the Universe Changed

The Washington Post called him "one of the most intriguing minds in the Western world".

Serious

Brain

POWER

lesson today
Lesson Today
  • We are going to watch one of James Burke’s videos: The Factory and Market place Revolution. As we watch, answer the questions on your handout.
slide18

Please do not talk at this time Nov. 30

HW: Finish your Magazine Ad for Monday and do the rest of the Cornell Notes for Chapter 9, Sec 1, from pg. 284

I am out today. Please look at the PPT called Industrial Inventions and the assignment Industrial Invention Magazine Ad.

Your Ad will be pg66A

Your Cornell Notes will be Pg. 64C/D

slide19

Please do not talk at this time Nov. Dec 3

Title

Name

Date

ASQ: Answer

BSQ: Answer

Summary

pg. 57A

HW: Do Cornell Notes for as far as we get today, Pg 284 - 288

Please set up a new piece of paper for Cornell Notes.

Title: Industrial Revolution Part 2 Cornell Notes, Pg. 67A

I am going to give you the Left Side of these notes for the Front Page which we will use in class during class notes.

You have 1 min 30 sec. to set up your paper.

slide20

Cottage Industry: The Start of Factories

$

$$$$$$

Best wool from Best Sheep

Merchant

Best Spinner spins Best Thread

Best Weaver weaves Best Cloth

Best Seamstress sews Best Clothes

The Best Shirt EVER!

One expensive item will make you RICH!

slide21

Before

Moving from the Cottage to the Factory

After

stationary simulation
Dear Frederick,

You have 10 minutes to design a beautiful piece of stationary ( a decorated piece of paper for writing letters to friends) that represents you. GO!

Sincerely,

Mrs. C.

Stationary Simulation

# of pg/class/10 min:

# / hour:

# per 8 Hr:

Price per pg: $

Total $: $

# of pg/1 person/30 sec:

# per min:

# per hour:

# per 8 Hr:

Price per pg: $

Total $per person: $

Total For class: $

slide25

Factory System

= $$$

X 100

Wool

X 1000

Raw Materials + Machines + Power = Goods

Many Cheap items will make you Richer!

Factory

Dye

Thread

Horse and Cart

Trains

I’m Filthy rich!

Goods are Transported to market to be sold for more $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

$$$$$$

$$$$$$

Steam Ships

slide26

Early Factories were nice places to work. People cooked and lived together in employee communities and their children went to community schools. Bosses knew their employees personally.

The Mills at Lanmark

slide27

Later Factories were bigger, harsher places. Bosses did not know their employees, did not care about them and could always hire someone else.

Manchester Factory Building

slide28

The Factory System

  • Huge potential for profit
  • Affordable products for everyone
  • No skill or training needed, anyone can work
  • Rigid schedule
  • 12-14 hour day
  • Dangerous conditions
  • Mind-numbing monotony.
slide29

Young “Bobbin-Doffers”

Inside the Factory: Workers received no benefits, sick days, disability, bathrooms or coffee breaks. They were responsible for their own safety and worked 14 hours a day. They started at age 6 and lived to be about 35.

slide30

New Inventions

of the

Industrial Revolution

slide31

James Watt’s Steam Engine

Uses burning coal to create steam that powers an engine to make machines move.

slide32

Jacquard’s Loom

Automatically weaves complicated designs into fabric. This uses early computer technology!

slide33

John Kay’s “Flying Shuttle”

Automatically weaves cloth very fast

slide34

The Power Loom

Automatically weaves huge amounts of cloth even faster.

slide35

Steam Tractor

Uses steam power to plow fields

slide36

Steam Ship

Uses steam power to move a boat without wind up and down canals and across the oceans

slide37

An Early Steam Locomotive

Uses steam power to transport goods, food, and people long distances very fast.

now turn this paper over
Open your book to pgs. 284-288 and add Book notes to your Cornell Notes

Don’t forget to finish your Summary and Questions!

Now turn this paper over…
slide41

Industrial Revolution Part 1 Cornell Notes, Pg. 64A

  • Factory and Marketplace Revolution Handout, Pg 65A
  • Magazine Ad- Pg 66A