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songlike poem that tells a story usually dealing with adventure and romance. ballad. A form of narrative poem. Rocky Raccoon by Paul McCartney

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slide2

songlike poem that tells a story

usually dealing with adventure and romance.

ballad

A form of

narrative poem

Rocky Raccoon by Paul McCartney

Somewhere in the black mountain hills of DakotaThere lived a young boy named Rocky RaccoonAnd one day his woman ran off with another guyHe hit young Rocky in the eyeRocky didn't like that he said I'm gonna get that boySo one day he walked into townBooked himself a room in the local saloonRocky Raccoon checked into his roomOnly to find Gideon's BibleRocky had come equipped with a gunTo shoot off the legs of his rivalHis rival it seems had broken his dreamsBy stealing the girl of his fancyHer name was Magill and she called herself LilBut everyone knew her as NancyNow she and her man, who called himself DanWere in the next room at the hoedownRocky burst in and grinning a grinHe said, “Danny boy this is a showdown?”But Daniel was hot he drew first and shotAnd Rocky collapsed in the cornerNow the doctor came in stinking of ginAnd proceeded to lie on the tableHe said, “Rocky you met your match”And Rocky said, “Doc it's only a scratchAnd I'll be better, I'll be better Doc as soon as I am able”And now Rocky Raccoon he fell back in his roomOnly to find Gideon's bibleGideon checked out and he left it no doubtTo help with good Rocky's revival

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Repetition of the same consonant sound at the beginnings of several words of a line of poetry or a sentence

alliteration

There will come soft rains and the smell of the ground,

And swallows calling with their shimmering sound.

from “There Will Come Soft Rains” by Sara Teasdale

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the obvious stretching of the truth

exaggeration

Small as a peanut,bBig as a giant, We're all the same size When we turn off the light. Rich as a sultan, Poor as a mite, We're all worth the same When we turn off the light.

from “No Differences” by Shel Silverstein

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Reference to something with which the reader is likely to be familiar, such as a person, place or event from history, literature, music, etc.

allusion

She drank from a bottle called DRINK MEAnd up she grew so tall,She ate from a plate called TASTE MEAnd down she shrank so small.And so she changed, while other folksNever tried nothin’ at all.

[references to a character from another book]

from “Alice” by Shel Silverstein

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All the tools a poet uses to create a special effect of feeling – includes metaphor, simile, alliteration, personification, and onomatopoeia.

figurative language

“Hope” is the thing with feathers -

That perches in the soul -

And sings the tune without the words -

And never stops - at all -

from “’Hope’ is the thing with feathers” by Emily Dickinson

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a common phrase made up of words that can’t be understood by their literal, or ordinary, meanings

idiom

Please swallow your pride if I have things you need to borrow,

For no one can fill those of your needs that you won’t let show.

Just call on me, brother, when you need a hand,

We all need somebody to lean on.

from “Lean on Me” by Bill Withers

more idioms

Raining cats and dogs (“raining real hard”)

Get a leg up (“get a start on”)

Lay it on thick ( (“exaggerate when praising”)

Pass the buck (“give someone else the blame”)

Teach an old dog new tricks (“get someone to change habits)

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The repetition of sounds of words

(sound/ground bird/word)

rhyme

There was an old owl who lived in an oak;The more he heard, the less he spoke.The less he spoke, the more he heard,Why aren't we like that wise old bird?

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feeling created in the reader by a poem or story. Words, phrases, repetition, rhyme, and exaggeration all work together to create this.

mood

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary,Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door -

from “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe

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musical quality created by a pattern of beats or a series of stressed and unstressed syllables

rhythm

My candle burns at both ends;It will not last the night;But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends—It gives a lovely light!

from “First Fig” by Edna St. Vincent Millay

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a group of lines in a poem set off by blank lines. It usually develops one idea.

stanza

2 lines couplet

3 lines tercet

4 lines quatrain

5 lines quintet

6 lines sestet

7 lines septet

8 lines octet

"This is my rock, And here I run To steal the secret of the sun;

"This is my rock, And here come I Before the night has swept the sky;

"This is my rock, This is the place I meet the evening face to face."

Small as a peanut, Big as a giant, We're all the same size When we turn off the light. Rich as a sultan, Poor as a mite, We're all worth the same When we turn off the light.

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type of figurative language in which poets give an animal, object or idea human qualities such as the ability to hear, feel, talk, make decisions.

personification

Summer grass aches and whispers.

It wants something; it calls and sings; it pours

out wishes the overhead stars.

The rain hears; the rain answers; the rain is slow

coming; the rain wets the face of the grass.

“Summer Grass” by Carl Sandburg

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One of the three major types of literature

(the other two being prose and drama)

poetry

I'm bored to deathCan that be even trueWell, I am still aliveI need something to doI gotta find some intrestBut I don't know whatI can't think of anythingMy mind's door is shut

-by Katherine Sessor

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Comparison between two unlike things using the words like or as.

simile

The willow is like an etching,

Fine-lined against the sky.

The ginkgo is like a crude sketch. [Comparison of trees to works of art]

Hardly worthy to be signed.

The willow’s music is like a soprano

Delicate and thin. [Comparison of tress to musical sounds]

The ginkgo’s tune is like a chorus

With everyone joining in.

“Simile: Willow and Ginkgo”” by Eve Merriam

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the use of any element of language—a sound, word, phrase, or sentence—more than once.

repetition

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary,Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door -

from “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe

slide16

Direct comparison between two

unlike things.

metaphor

The fog comes

on little cat feet.

[Comparison of fog to a cat]

It sits looking

over harbor and city

on silent haunches

and then moves on.

“Fog” by Carl Sandburg

slide17

Long poem about a person of high position who sets out on a great journey and has many episodes/adventures that are heroic and important to a nation or race.

epic poem

slide19

writing or speech thatappeals to one or more of the five senses

sensory language/imagery

The black cat zoomed

up the tree

Screeching loudly

[passage engages sight and sound]

slide20

when a poet uses an object to stand for something else

symbolism

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,

And sorry I could not travel both

And be one traveler, long I stood

And looked down one as far as I could

To where it bent in the undergrowth;

[the road symbolizes life’s decisions]

Then took the other, as just as fair,

And having perhaps the better claim,

Because it was grassy and wanted wear;

Though as for that the passing there

Had worn them really about the same. . .

from “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost

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poem with no definite rhyme,

rhythm or set verse

free verse

Those Winter Sundaysby Robert HaydenSundays too my father got up earlyand put his clothes on in the blueblack cold,then with cracked hands that achedfrom labor in the weekday weather madebanked fires blaze. No one ever thanked him.I'd wake and hear the cold splintering, breaking.When the rooms were warm, he'd call,and slowly I would rise and dress,fearing the chronic angers of that house,Speaking indifferently to him,who had driven out the coldand polished my good shoes as well.What did I know, what did I knowof love's austere and lonely offices?

slide22

use of words that sound like the noises they describe

onomatopoeia

Susie’s galoshes

Make splishes and sploshes

And slooshes and sloshes

As Susie steps slowly

Along in the slush.

from “Galoshes” by Rhoda Baemeister

slide23

14 lines, definite rhyme and rhythm, often love or nature poems, usually very emotional

sonnet

It hurts me to say, but the truth can hurt,There is a girl that I just want to slap.Maybe I'm just having an anger spurt,But she talks secretly; she talks much crap.On the surface she is a happy one,No matter what, she has a true dark side.She seems very cheery and lots of fun,But her true happiness and cheer has died.It's surprising I used to be her friend,After what she did—there's no going back.Our friendship is completely at an end,Me and other true friends are what you lack.Walking around like you are the top ace, Girl, you best expect a slap in the face.

slide24

The pattern of end rhyme

(aabbababaabba)

rhyme scheme

There was an old owl who lived in an oak; [A]The more he heard, the less he spoke. [A]The less he spoke, the more he heard, [B]Why aren't we like that wise old bird? [B]

There once was a big brown cat. [A]

That liked to eat a lot of mice. [B]He got all round and fat. [A]Because they tasted so nice. [B]

There once was a dog named Jerm [A]who liked to slurp up worms. [A]He got sick to his stomach [B]and began to vomit [B]and now Jerm no longer eats worms. [A]

slide25

poem which tells a story

narrative poem

I saw the other day when I went shopping in the store

A man I hadn't ever, ever seen in there before,

A man whose leg was broken and who leaned upon a crutch-

I asked him very kindly if it hurt him very much.

"Not at all!" said the broken-legg'd man.

I ran around behind him for I thought that I would see

The broken leg all bandaged up and bent back at the knee;

But I didn't see the leg at all, there wasn't any there,

So I asked him very kindly if he had it hid somewhere.

"Not at all!" said the broken-legg'd man.

"Then where," I asked him, "is it? Did a tiger bite it off?

Or did you get your foot wet when you had a nasty cough?

Did someone jump down on your leg when it was very new?

Or did you simply cut it off because you wanted to?"

"Not at all!" said the broken-legg'd man.

"What was it then?" I asked him, and this is what he said:

"I crossed a busy crossing when the traffic light was red;

A big black car came whizzing by and knocked me off my feet."

"Of course you looked both ways," I said, "before you crossed the street."

"Not at all!" said the broken-legg'd man.

"They rushed me to the hospital right quickly, "he went on,

"And when I woke in nice white sheets I saw my leg was gone;

That's why you see me walking now on nothing but a crutch."

"I'm glad," said I, "you told me, and I thank you very much!"

"Not at all!" said the broken-legg'd man.

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Regularly repeated line or group of lines

refrain

The cat so silentLay curled up on the rugThe fire a blazeThe room so snug.

Purring, purring

Quiet and stillPurring, purringContent from his fill.

Tatters the catBig, fat cat.

He had just eatenA dinner of fishWhat a treat to haveFilling up his dish.

Purring, purringQuiet and stillPurring, purringContent from his fill.

Tatters the catBig, fat cat.

No more cold for the dayHe was in for the nightFun he had hadWhen the day was light.

Purring, purringQuiet and stillPurring, purringContent from his fill.

Tatters the catBig, fat cat.

slide27

A short, musical poem which expresses a single speaker’s strong emotion

lyric poem

How Do I Love Thee?

by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.I love thee to the depth and breadth and heightMy soul can reach, when feeling out of sightFor the ends of Being and ideal GraceI love thee to the level of everyday'sMost quiet need, by sun and candle-light.I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.I love thee with the passion put to useIn my old griefs, and with my childhood's faithI love thee with a love I seem to loveWith my lost saints, - I love thee with the breath,Smiles, tears, of all my life! - and, if God choose,I shall but love thee better after death.

slide28

3 lines (5, 7, 5 syllables) usually about nature, always strong imagery,

Japanese origin

haiku

I walk across sand (5 syllables)

And find myself blistering (7 syllables)

In the hot, hot heat (5 syllables)

slide29

5 lines (aabba rhyme scheme), stupid, nonsense humor

limerick

There once was a dinosaur named Fred [A]Who liked to eat nothing but bread. [A]But it had not been invented [B]So he grew thin and dented [B]And soon he was lying there dead. [A]

There was a young cannibal Ned, [A]

Who used to eat onions in bed; [A]

His mother said, 'Sonny, [B]

It's not very funny, [B]

Why don't you eat people instead ?[A]

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The End

(mercifully)