principals partnerships data n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Principals, Partnerships & Data PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Principals, Partnerships & Data

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 32

Principals, Partnerships & Data - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 191 Views
  • Uploaded on

Principals, Partnerships & Data . Title I Network May 8, 2013. Today:. Changing nature of family-school-community partnerships Ideas for how principals can structure partnerships How schools can share data with families. . New Definition of Family Engagement.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Principals, Partnerships & Data' - xia


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
principals partnerships data

Principals, Partnerships & Data

Title I Network May 8, 2013

today
Today:
  • Changing nature of family-school-community partnerships
  • Ideas for how principals can structure partnerships
  • How schools can share data with families.
new definition of family engagement
New Definition of Family Engagement

Family engagement is a shared responsibility of families, schools, and communities for student learning and achievement;

It is continuous from birth to young adulthood; and

It occurs across multiple settings where children learn.

From “Beyond Random Acts” Report; http://www.nationalpirc.org/engagement_forum/beyond_random_acts.pdf

the change to systemic family engagement
The Change to Systemic Family Engagement

Old Way

New Way

  • Individual responsibility for student learning
  • Deficit-based interactions
  • Add-on programs
  • One-shot projects
  • Compliance-driven engagement

From “Beyond Random Acts” report

  • Shared responsibility for student learning
  • Strength-based interactions
  • Integrated programs
  • Sustained efforts
  • Shared ownership for continuous improvement
principals the bridge between teachers and families
Principals: the bridge between teachers and families

Schools with effective partnerships have principals who prioritize family engagement:

  • Create a structure for family engagement
  • Enact school policy encouraging engagement
  • Practice effective family engagement by
    • Giving teachers time and training to plan and work with families
    • Giving families many opportunities to support children’s learning and connect with school
    • Frequently communicate the importance of family engagement

Fege, 2006: http://www.sedl.org/ws/ws-fam-comm.pdf

structuring family engagement into school life
Structuring family engagement into school life
  • Need is clear
  • Desire is there
  • Benefits are clear
  • Difficult to do

Goal of family engagement philosophy:

  • Build capacity of both school and families for partnership
  • Increase connections
  • Boost confidence
  • Improve results for students
slide7

Goal-Oriented Partnership Program

SCHOOL GOVERNANCE COUNCIL (SGC)

writes or approves

School Improvement Plan with Specific Goals

Action Team for

Partnerships Using the Six Types

Goal 1 Academic

Goal 3

Attendance

Goal 2 Academic

Goal 4 Partnership Climate

Family & Community Involvement Activities

1.

2.

3.

4.

Family & Community Involvement Activities

1.

2.

3.

4.

Family & Community Involvement Activities

1.

2.

3.

4.

Family & Community Involvement Activities

1.

2.

3.

4.

taking the plunge the partnership action team
Taking the Plunge:The Partnership Action Team

Easy because

  • Research-based, proven
  • Parents and teachers have

equal voices

  • Authentic decision making

and review process

Not-so-Easy because

  • Time-consuming
  • Difficult to find parents
  • Staff buy-in required
alternatives to the action team the sprinkler method
Alternatives to the Action Team: The Sprinkler Method

Charge each staff committee with

engaging families

  • Every staff committee must devote meeting time to developing activities that communicate, support, or engage families and the community
  • Spreads effective practices throughout staff and school
  • Piecemeal approach? Who’s in charge of coordinating? Implementing?
  • Staff buy-in required.
alternatives to action team the toe dip
Alternatives to Action Team:The “Toe-Dip”

One Staff Committee with

targeted parent feedback

  • Assign partnerships to one

new or existing committee

  • Requires significant effort to obtain the parent voice
  • Committee’s effort must be communicated/connected to other school efforts
  • Too little impact on too few families?
  • Staff buy-in required.
how can my school get parent feedback
How Can My School Get Parent Feedback?

At Events and Activities:

  • Parent Surveys on-line, at-event,

and telephone

  • Family Night Evaluations
  • Coffee with the Principal
  • School Walk-throughs
  • Neighborhood Walk-throughs
  • Parent group meetings
  • Suggestion Boxes
connecting with families many new tech possibilities
Connecting with Families: Many New Tech Possibilities
  • Webstreamhome-school meetings live from community locations: anymeeting.com
  • Twitter parents: school event reminders, good news about child, weekly “PTchat” question
  • Poll Everywhere: instant response from families
  • Skype parent-teacher conferences and student performances for distant family members
  • Online administrator blogs
  • Online school newsletters
  • Teacher websites and Moodle

http://efacetoday.blogspot.com/

how can groups at my school get parent feedback
How Can Groups at My School Get Parent Feedback?

With Groups that invite parents:

  • Focus Groups
  • Study circles
  • Book clubs
  • PTA/PTO
  • ELL task forces
  • Learning communities
  • PBIS/RtI committees
  • Ad hoc to SIP
  • Title I parent advisory committees
  • Community planning task force
parent leadership roles
Parent Leadership Roles
  • Mentor for Other Parents
  • Co-Trainer
  • Event Organizer
  • Participant in Focus Groups
  • Member of Hiring Committees
  • Participant at Conferences and Working Meetings
  • Participant in Quality Improvement / Evaluation Activities
  • Grant reviewer
  • Contributor to Written and Audiovisual Materials
  • Advocate for Individuals, Families and / or Programs
  • Translator of materials or interpreter for families
  • Task Force, Advisory Board, or Steering Committee Member
parent teacher action research
Parent-Teacher Action Research

Investigates a question important to school community (p 196, Beyond the Bake Sale):

  • Form a team and choose a facilitator
  • Determine parents’ priorities and interests by conducting surveys, interviews
  • Decide on plan of action for further study
  • Compile and communicate results
  • Decide on next steps for school, community

See: How Can Elementary Teachers Collaborate More Effectively with Parents to Support Literacy Learning? www.hfrp.org

whatever family engagement structure a school decides to use
Whatever family engagement structure a school decides to use

Principals, plan to

  • Know your families: demographics,

funds of knowledge, challenges

  • Aim for staff ownership and buy-in by providing the tools for family engagement
  • Know your school’s learning strengths and gaps
  • Be prepared to share student/school data with families.
know your families
Know Your Families!

Public Agenda study of Kansas City parents found:

  • 31% are Potential Transformers willing to play a bigger role, comfortable taking action, but waiting to be invited.
  • 27% are School Helpers willing to do more to volunteer, help child’s school. They trust staff, but are less drawn to policy or politics.
  • 20% are Help Seekers, worried about their child’s learning, more critical of and more disconnected from schools.

http://www.publicagenda.org/pages/ready-willing-and-able

next steps for kansas city lessons for all
Next Steps for Kansas CityLessons for All
  • Parents want to know how be more involved at home in children’s learning
  • Parents want workshops on how to improve students’ habits and schoolwork
  • African American and Hispanic parents preferred face-to-face meetings over e-mails
  • Address parents’ top concerns first: school safety, bullying, quality education opportunities for all children, extra help for those who need it
  • Make schools, staff more welcoming to Help Seekers
why share data with families
Why Share Data with Families?

“Without data, you are just another person with an opinion.” -- The Education Trust

“When the teacher and parent look at a child's work together, the parent is …… learning, analyzing, and seeing the rationale behind the teacher's instructional decisions.”

Sharing Data with Families at Parent-Teacher Conferences

http://www.choiceliteracy.com/articles-detail-view.php?id=490

create a data sharing culture in school
Create a Data Sharing Culture in School

Principals can impact staff:

  • Emphasize the importance of sharing data
  • Help staff understand effective data-sharing practices
  • Encourage teachers to share data with families in many ways and keep it updated
  • Allow staff time to share challenges.

Principals can impact families:

  • Orient families to understanding and using data
  • Designate computers at school and in community for parents to use
  • Survey parents about usefulness of data.
wisconsin s data tools
Wisconsin’s Data Tools
  • School Report Cards
  • PALS-K screener
  • MAPS scores
  • WKCE Scores
  • Smarter Balanced Assessment
  • PLAN Test
  • AP results
  • ACT/SAT
  • WINSS, soon WISEdash
sharing student data what families want to know
Sharing Student Data:what Families want to know
  • #1: How is my child doing?
  • #2: How can I help my child improve?
  • #3: How is my child’s school doing?
  • Why sharing data is important and valuable
  • Education terms: differential instruction, benchmark, formative, MAPS, Lexile, PALS, etc.
  • Learning benchmarks and goals
  • What reading/math instruction looks like in child’s classroom
  • Specific activities parents can do to meet goals
  • Online resources they can use
  • Who to contact how with concerns
how are parent portals used
How are Parent Portals used?

One study found parents :

  • used the portal to check child’s grades, but not assignment completion or attendance
  • Used the portal more than any other form of home-school communication
  • Felt more engaged when they used the portal
  • Felt it encouraged them to communicate more with child’s teacher
  • Did not understand how to access detailed grade information on the portal
how schools can help families understand school data
How Schools Can Help Families Understand School Data
  • Hold data workshops to explain how data are used to improve achievement
  • Send home rubrics for class projects
  • Display high-quality student work in school and on website to exemplify high standards
  • Include family learning activities in newsletters and hold family literacy/family math nights;
  • Use student achievement data to help families focus on specific grade-level academic goals;
  • Include families on school improvement teams and grade-level planning meetings.
start 2013 13 with a learning goals for families workshop
Start 2013-13 with a Learning Goals for Families Workshop
  • Review your School Report Card
  • Identify School Goals
  • Identify school-wide efforts to achieve goals
  • What are teachers doing to meet goals in classrooms/subject areas?
  • How will child’s progress be communicated to parents?
  • How will school invite feedback from parents about progress and needs?
  • How can parents support child’s learning?
  • How can parents support the school?
examples of effective family school data sharing practices
Examples of Effective family-School Data-Sharing Practices
  • Parent-Teacher Academic Teams Wisconsin RtI Activity: http://www.wisconsinrticenter.org/parents-and-family/understanding-rti/femodule/ba-overview/aptt.html
  • College Readiness Tracker System: http://jgc.stanford.edu/our_work/cris/VUE35.pdf
  • Nevada PIRC’s “Parent Basics of Elementary & Secondary” and Road to College courses: http://www.nevadapirc.org/programs-initiatives/parentschoolpartnership/.
  • “Dust off” School-Parent Compacts (CT): http://schoolparentcompact.org/about/
  • Ohio’s Welcoming Walk-Through Toolkit
new dpi resources for families
New DPI Resources for Families
  • Agenda 2017 Overview, Fact Sheets, and video: http://dpi.wi.gov/sprntdnt/2017_resources.html
  • School Report Cards and Parent Guide: http://dpi.wi.gov/oea/acct/accountability.html
  • Common Core State Standards families page: http://standards.dpi.wi.gov/families/families
  • WKCE scoring changes: http://oea.dpi.wi.gov/oea_dacnwltrs/#infoho
  • PALS-K for parents: http://www.palswisconsin.info/parents.html
  • Family and Community Engagement Toolkit:

http://dpi.wi.gov/files/ssos/pdf/toolkit-family_community_engagement.pdf

resources for implementing a system of family engagement
Resources for Implementing A System of Family Engagement
  • SEDL’s Working Systemically in Action Guide: http://www.sedl.org/ws/ws-fam-comm.pdf
  • Beyond Random Acts: Family, School & Community Engagement as an Integral Part of Education Reform: http://www.hfrp.org/publications-resources/browse-our-publications/beyond-random-acts-family-school-and-community-engagement-as-an-integral-part-of-education-reform
  • Handbook on Family and Community Engagement: http://www.families-schools.org/downloads/FACEHandbook.pdf
  • National Network of Partnership Schools website: www.partnershipschools.org
data sharing resources
Data-Sharing Resources

Working with Families

Staff Training Resources

  • Tips for Administrators, Teachers, and Families: How to Share Data Effectively: http://www.hfrp.org
  • Data Sharing through Parent Portals: http://www.hfrp.org/
  • Sharing Data with Families at Parent-Teacher Conferences: http://www.choiceliteracy.com/articles-detail-view.php?id=490
  • NEA Power of Family School Community Partnerships: http://www2.nea.org/mediafiles/pdf/FSCP_Manual_2012.pdf
  • Making Data Work: A Parent and Community Guide http://www.edtrust.org/dc/publication/parent-and-community-data-guide