map pg 72 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
MAP pg. 72 : PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
MAP pg. 72 :

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 49

MAP pg. 72 : - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 85 Views
  • Uploaded on

MAP pg. 72 :. Please take a British Isles map. Complete it by labeling and color coding the following: Ireland United Kingdom English Channel Irish Sea North Sea Thames River England Great Britain Northern Ireland Wales Scotland Dublin London. High and Late Middle Ages 1050-1450.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

MAP pg. 72 :


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
map pg 72
MAP pg. 72:
  • Please take a British Isles map. Complete it by labeling and color coding the following:
  • Ireland
  • United Kingdom
  • English Channel
  • Irish Sea
  • North Sea
  • Thames River
  • England
  • Great Britain
  • Northern Ireland
  • Wales
  • Scotland
  • Dublin
  • London
3 2 1 2 3 top of page 72
3, 2, 1, 2, 3 top of page 72
  • 3 Parts of Great Britain
  • 2 British Isle Countries
  • 1 Definition of what the United Kingdom is.
  • 2 Capitol Cities
  • 3 Important bodies of water
evolution of british and government bottom of page 72
Evolution of British and Government: bottom of page 72
  • Make a timeline at the bottom of your page using the information below.
  • 1066- Norman conquest
  • 1086- Domesday Book
  • 1160’s-1180’s- Common Law
  • 1215- Magna Carta
  • 1295- Model Parliament
the rest of pg 73
The Rest of pg. 73
  • WHO ARE YOU?
  • British and French Monarchs of the High and Late Middle Ages
how to set up page 73
How to set up page 73
  • Holding your notebook landscape style, above the red line write down the names of the following monarchs.
  • King John
  • Henry II
  • William the Conqueror
  • Edward I
  • Hugh Capet
  • Phillip II
  • Louis IX
  • Phillip IV
more for page 73
More for Page 73
  • On the lined part of the page, Make the chart that you will fill out matching the correct royal with the actions that he took during his rule.
  • Please make sure that you leave enough space under the notable action column.
  • Please see next slide….
top of pg 74
Top of pg. 74
  • With rulers fighting for more power, explosive conflicts erupted between monarchs and the Church
    • After the death of Charlemagne, the Holy Roman Empire dissolved into a number of separate states
    • German emperors claimed authority over much of Europe, France, and Italy
    • It was called the Holy Roman Empire because:
    • They were crowned by the pope
    • “Roman” because they saw themselves as heirs to the emperors of ancient Rome.
bottom of pg 74
Bottom of Pg. 74

Working with a partner, Use the following pages 251-254 to complete

Your guided notes sheet . Then using that information, complete the Lay investiture chronology.

  • Paste the guided notes half sheet:
chronology for lay investiture bottom of pg 74
Chronology for Lay Investiture: Bottom of pg74

Using the textbook and what you have learned today in class, do your best to put the following chronology in order:

____The struggle for investiture lasted for almost 50 years.

____In 1122, both sides accepted a treaty called the Concordat of Worms- stated that only the Church could appoint bishops.

____Popes, like Gregory VII, tried to end lay investiture, which they saw as outside interference from secular rulers

____The Holy Roman emperors and other monarchs often appointed Church officials for their land, lay investiture

slide12

Documents Influencing Early Government

Magna Carta: 1215

Barons vs. King John

Petition of Right: 1628

Parliament and Charles I

English Bill of Rights: 1688

Parliament and Will/Mary of Orange

  • Trial by jury
  • Due process of law
  • Later, All people, not just privileged protected
  • Power of monarch not absolute (limited by the Constitution and it’s Articles)
  • Trial by jury for political critics
  • Can’t rule by force
  • No quartering of soldiers
  • Monarchs must obey law of land (Constitution)
  • Fair Speedy Trial
  • Parliament approves changes to laws
  • Freedom from excessive bail
  • No cruel and unusual punishment
  • Free elections
the english bill of rights 1688
The English Bill of Rights: 1688

In 1688, after years of revolt and turmoil, Parliament offered the crown to William and Mary of Orange during the Glorious Rebellion. To prevent William and Mary misusing their powers, Parliament, in 1689, drew up a Bill of Rights they had to agree to.

The English Bill of Rights prohibited a standing army in peacetime (except with Parliaments permission) and required that all elections be free. It also declared that laws could not be changed without consent of the parliament. Also included the right to a fair and speedy trial, freedom from excessive bail, and protection from cruel and unusual punishment.

slide14

Documents Influencing Early Government

Magna Carta: 1215

Barons vs. King John

Petition of Right: 1628

Parliament and Charles I

English Bill of Rights: 1688

Parliament and Will/Mary of Orange

  • Trial by jury
  • Due process of law
  • Later, All people, not just privileged protected
  • Power of monarch not absolute (limited by the Constitution and it’s Articles)
  • Trial by jury for political critics
  • Can’t rule by force
  • No quartering of soldiers
  • Monarchs must obey law of land (Constitution)
  • Fair Speedy Trial
  • Parliament approves changes to laws
  • Freedom from excessive bail
  • No cruel and unusual punishment
  • Free elections
wrap up

Wrap-Up

What are the similarities of these documents?

What are the differences?

What is similar between these documents and the American Constitution?

what else was going on in the world at 1050 all of pg 76
What else was going on in the world at 1050?All of pg. 76

ISLAMIC EMPIRE

INDIA

CHINA

Islamic civilization spread from Spain to India.

Islamic traders went as far as West Africa.

Cities thrived, despite political division.

Hinduism and Buddhism flourished.

Culture flourished under Tang and Song dynasties.

Chinese made advances in technology.

WEST AFRICA

AMERICAS

BYZANTINE EMPIRE

The Sonike people built the great trading empire of Ghana.

Merchants traded gold all over the world.

Mayas cleared rain forests to build cities.

Native Americans in Peru built empires.

Scholars studied Greek and Roman writings.

Merchants mingled with traders from the Italian states.

pg 77 crusades guided notes sheet
Pg. 77 Crusades Guided Notes Sheet.
  • We will also watch a clip from Mankind: The Story of All of Us. It will reinforce the information from the guided notes.
a little background
A little Background:
  • A Little Background…
  • The outside world in 1050- While Europe was stuck in the Dark Ages, the rest of the world was booming with cultural, political and Economic Advancements.
  • + Including
  • Islamic World, India, China, W. Africa, American Civilizations, and the Byzantines.
a little background cont
A Little Background Cont.
  • Remember feudalism was a result of the need forProtection. Now that the need for knights and warrior culture has declined feudalism is breaking down.
  • What is a bored young knight supposed to do? Find a new cause The Crusades.
launching the crusades
Launching the Crusades
  • Crusades are a HOLY WAR
  • Their goal was TO DRIVE MUSLIMS OUT OF THE HOLY LAND (JERUSALEM)
  • 1071 Turks take Jerusalem and part of the Byzantine Empire in the COUNCIL OF CLAIRMONT
  • It was there that Pope Urban II asked forCHRISTAIN WARRIORS
  • Rallying cry“GOD WILLS IT!”
fighting the crusades
Fighting the Crusades:
  • Fighting the Crusades
  • 1096 First Crusade
  • Group A: PEASANTS AND TO GAIN MONEY
  • Group B:KNIGHTS TO CAPTURE JERUSALEM AND DIVIDE IT INTO 4 PARTS
fighting the crusades1
Fighting the Crusades:
  • 1144 Second Crusade-
  • *MUSLIMS BEGIN TAKING THE HOLY LAND BACK
  • 1175 SALADIN(Muslim leader) drove all of the Christians out of Jerusalem.
  • A draw was declared by KING RICHARD THE LIONHEARTwho rode back to England.
  • 1201-1291
  • * 4TH -9TH CRUSADES – DISORGANIZED AND UNSUCCESSFUL.* MUSLIMS DRIVEN OUT OF THE HOLY LAND
effects of crusades on feudal europe
Effects of Crusades on Feudal Europe
  • Effects of the Crusades on Feudal Europe
  • *Economic TRADE GOES UP- EUROPE GETS NEW PRODUCTS- (SPICES)
  • *Political POWER OF NOBILITY WENT DOWN AND POWER OF THE MONARCHS WENT UP.
  • *Social PERSECUTION OF JEWS AND MUSLIMS
mankind episode crusades top of 78
Mankind Episode Crusades Topof 78
  • 3, 2, 1-
  • 3- reasons people went on crusades-
  • 2- Important people
  • 1- Holy city that was captured.
crusades chronology bottom of pg 78
Crusades Chronology: Bottomof pg78
  • ___Saladin drove the Christians out of the Holy Land.
  • ___Pope Urban II sent the Christians to fight Muslims at the Council of Claremont.
  • ___Feudal Society begins to break down. Knights are bored.
  • ___Christian Knights Capture the holy land and divided it into 4 sections.
reading like a historian artist activity pg 79
Reading like a Historian Artist Activity pg.79
  • Using the three documents in the folders, at your table on pg. 79 holding your notebook landscape style,
  • Make three equal size columns title each column
  • Column 1 is Document A
  • Column 2 is Document B
  • Column 3 is Document C
  • When done, use the A.R.T.I.S.T format for understanding primary sources to decipher each document.
  • The first document is from the perspective of a crusader
  • The second is from a Muslim living in the Jerusalem
  • The third- will be up to you to decipher. Using previous knowledge and the document
crusades historical heads pg 80
Crusades- Historical Heads pg. 80
  • Assignment- using the templates and the information provided, create a historical head for a crusader knight and a Muslim most likely a Selijuk Turk living in Jerusalem at that time.
  • What would each be thinking regarding the crusades, the ownership of the “Holy Land” and of each other?
  • See instructions for exact directions
  • At the end of the activity on the back of the sheet have an explanation for each of the items/images used and what there meanings are.
wars conflict and candy
Wars, Conflict, and Candy?
  • When you bite/break a YORK Peppermint Patty, what COLOR do you see?
what caused war and conflict in the middle ages
What Caused War and Conflict in the Middle Ages?
  • EQ: What caused war and conflict in the late Middle Ages:

Religious Crises:

  • Rise in Heresy:
  • Inquisitions:
  • **
wars conflict and candy1
Wars, Conflict, and Candy?
  • Wars and Conflict:
  • 100 Years War:
  • *Joan of Arc-
  • War of the Roses:
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • War ended when ___________________ took over the thrown
  • Why did it lead to peace?
learning and culture flourish

Learning and Culture Flourish

Section 8-4

pp. 262-268

preview questions
Preview Questions
  • How did medieval universities advance learning?
  • How did “new” learning affect medieval thought?
  • What styles of art, literature, and architecture developed in the High Middle Ages?
medieval universities
Medieval Universities
  • Early Universities
    • Evolved from cathedral schools established to train clergy members
    • Organized like guilds
      • Charters protected rights of members
      • Standards for training
medieval universities1
Medieval Universities
  • Student Life
    • Long hours and harsh conditions
    • Focused on memorization
    • Studied several liberal arts
    • Could eventually become a “master” of the arts
medieval universities2
Medieval Universities
  • Women and Education
    • Women were not allowed to attend universities, which greatly limited their opportunities
    • Christine de Pizan: Famous author who wrote The City of Ladies about the capabilities of women
    • Women were expected to remain at home and use their “natural gifts”
europeans acquire new learning
Europeans Acquire “New” Learning
  • Spread of Learning
    • Muslim scholars preserved “classic” works of Greece
    • Jews in Spain translated these works into Latin, sparking a new interest in learning
europeans acquire new learning1
Europeans Acquire “New” Learning
  • Philosophy
    • Christians struggled to adopt Aristotle’s teachings of truth based on reason.
    • Scholasticism
      • Using reason to support religious beliefs
      • Popularized by St. Thomas Aquinas’ Summa Theologica
europeans acquire new learning2
Europeans Acquire “New” Learning
  • Science and Math
    • Scientific progress was slow because some knowledge conflicted with Church teachings
    • Mathematic advances were adopted from Arabic culture
europeans acquire new learning3
Europeans Acquire “New” Learning
  • Medieval Literature
    • New writings appeared in the vernacular, or everyday languages of ordinary people
    • Epics told stories of heroic deeds
      • Ex: Song of Roland and El Cid
    • Dante’s Divine Comedy
      • Imaginary journey into hell and purgatory
      • Idea: Actions in this life determine fate in afterlife
    • Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales
      • Tale of Christians on a pilgrimage
      • Characters represent different medieval social roles
architecture and art
Architecture and Art
  • Romanesque Style
    • Thick Walls
    • Semi-circular arches
    • Towers
    • Dark and gloomy

Romanesque Cathedral in Lisbon, Portugal

architecture and art1
Architecture and Art
  • Gothic Style
    • Higher walls
    • Stained glass windows
    • Tall Spires
    • Supported by flying buttresses
    • Intricate carvings
    • Gargoyles

Reims Cathedral in France

illuminated manuscripts
Illuminated Manuscripts
  • Illumination: Artistic decoration of books

Illustration of the Annunciation from the Book of Hours

quote interpretation the black plague
Quote Interpretation: The Black Plague
  • What can you infer about the Black Death/Life in the Middle Ages from the following quote-
  • “Victims of the plague ate lunch with a friend, and dinner with their ancestors in paradise.”