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The Roaring 20s: women ’ s expanding horizons - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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- in the early years of the twentieth century, horizons for women were expanding – in the workplace, on the social scene, in sports, and even at home

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The Roaring 20s: women ’ s expanding horizons


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    1. - in the early years of the twentieth century, horizons for women were expanding – in the workplace, on the social scene, in sports, and even at home - for some women the issues of alcohol, poverty, and child welfare became a special concern (these female reformers came primarily from the middle and upper classes) The Roaring 20s: women’s expanding horizons

    2. many women joined the Women’s Christian Temperance Union (W.C.T.U.) The Roaring 20s: women, reform and social justice • It and other women’s groups attracted large memberships and worked to: • reform the social system (improved public health codes and hospitals; safer factories; improved prison conditions and education) • provide allowances for mothers and child protection legislation • secure the vote and equality for women • and fight the “demon drink”

    3. Women’s Christian Temperance Union (W.C.T.U.) there was a feeling amongst women’s groups that alcohol was the root cause of many societal problems: • - wife abuse (physical and mental) • - child neglect • - poverty • prostitution • crime • - unemployment

    4. The Women’s Christian Temperance Union worked tirelessly to ban the sale of liquor in Canada during the war, ingredients used by distillers and brewers were needed to produce food for the troops The Roaring 20s: Women and Prohibition • finally the movement was successful and prohibition became a reality

    5. between 1915 and 1917, every province except Quebec outlawed the production, sale and consumption of alcohol (PEI was the first in 1903) in 1918, Prime Minister Borden incorporated Prohibition into Canada’s war effort The Roaring 20s: Prohibition

    6. in the U.S.A. Prohibition was federal law from 1920 to 1933 in Canada, however, the so-called “noble experiment” would sputter out more rapidly • Quebec never truly enforced Prohibition and most provincial governments gave up on total Prohibition by the early to mid-1920s “Prohibition is tyranny”Henri Bourassa

    7. Samuel Bronfman one of the most remarkable Canadian risk-takers of the Prohibition era was a man named Samuel Bronfman his family established a successful Prairie hotel business and capitalized on its success to found the Canada Pure Drug Company in Saskatchewan (in 1919) Canadian laws allowed Bronfman’s company to import unlimited amounts of liquor from Europe for “medicinal purposes” { Canada’s Prohibition laws focused on banning the sale and consumption of alcohol, not its production }

    8. this liquor was then distributed to company warehouses along the Canadian side of the border from there, liquor was quietly smuggled into the United States Bronfman profited from this underground economy and would build a business empire he was one of many Canadian smugglers who profited from America’s tighter Prohibition restrictions (much to the dismay of American law enforcement agencies)