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HALLOWEEN JEOPARDY!!! - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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It is the perfect Halloween night. You and your group of friends are on a hunt for the best candy in all the neighborhood. After an extensive search, you finally come across the legendary house of Brad Silimperi and his brother Bill Gerhauser (and yes, they do not have the same last name.) This is exactly the house you have been looking for. It has almost every type of big bar imaginable, all of them calling your name. This house, however, is not like any other house on the block. To get the treats you must win. The game is simple. For every 100 points you acquire, you get your choice of a candy bar. The player with the most points at the end will receive a special prize in addition to the candy. Incorrect answers will be deducted from your point total though, so enter with caution. This is a trick-or-treat occasion you will NOT want to miss out on. It’s time for…

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HALLOWEEN

JEOPARDY!!!

With your hosts: Sara Naselsky and Ally Zeltt

jeopardy
Jeopardy

Imagine

This

Expand Your

Vocabulary

More Than

Meets the Eye

Group Up!

Micellaneous

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what are birds and fish
What are birds and fish?

The Psychology Behind It

Your brain uses a combination of figure and ground as well as grouping to identify the two animals. First, your brain sees the contrast between the light and dark (grouping). At the top of the picture, the bird stands out more than the background, so it is the figure while the white background is the ground. As you move further down, this perspective reverses and the black becomes the ground while the white becomes the figure.

what is a horse grazing in the snow on a mountain top something along those lines
What is a horse grazing in the snow on a mountain top? (something along those lines)

The Psychology Behind It

At first, your brain probably sees a snowy mountain top with nothing special about it. If you stare at it for a while, you will soon see the shape of horses appearing. This is because at first, the horses blend into the background and are grouped with the scenery that they resemble. However, if you look more closely, the horses become the figure of the picture while the snowy scene becomes the ground.

what is the word lift
What is the word “lift”?

The Psychology Behind It

This picture is a classic example of the figure-ground relationship. If you look at the white part of the picture as the ground and the black part of the picture as the background, you will see a bunch of black oddly shaped blobs. If you reverse the situation though, you will see the word “lift”.

what are a duck and a rabbit
What are a duck and a rabbit?

The Psychology Behind It

The key to distinguishing the two animals in this picture is orientation. When you look at this picture straight on, it appears as if the picture is of a rabbit. If you mentally rotate the picture to the right (as shown below) you will see that it looks like a rabbit. This basically is what the top-down process is because at first glance your brain uses previous experiences to generate the picture of a duck. You normally don’t see a rabbit that looks like this, so you don’t see it at first.

what are a frog and a horse
What are a frog and a horse?

The Psychology Behind It

This is a more difficult application of the top down process because it is a more complex picture. Using previous experience, your brain is able to see a frog floating on the water because this is a picture you normally recognize. However, your brain doesn’t automatically pick up on the horse that appears to be a part of the water. It takes your brain some time to focus on that image because you aren’t accustomed to seeing a horse in that sort of setting.

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You are on a haunted hayride and while riding, you focus your eyes on a giant Frankenstein in the distance. The objects that are closer to you than the monster seem to be moving backwards. Name the phenomenon.

what is relative motion
What is Relative Motion?

The Psychology Behind It

As we move, objects that are stationary may seem like they are moving, but they are not. The closer the object is to you, the faster the object seems to move.

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Freddy Krueger is chasing you along railroad tracks with a chainsaw. You tell yourself you will continue to run until you reach the end. This was foolish of you because even though the lines appear to converge, the tracks always remain parallel. Eventually you get tired and Freddy catches you. Name the perspective that influenced your decision.

what is linear perspective
What is Linear Perspective?

The Psychology Behind It

This monocular cue makes the tracks appear non- parallel after a certain point. The more the lines converge, the greater their perceived distance.

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You are driving down the street on Halloween night. You see tiny people and instantly assume that they are far away. Unfortunately, they are not. They are just trick-or-treaters and are much closer than they appeared. You can’t slow your car down before it’s too late…you know what happens next. Name that monocular cue.

what is relative size
What is Relative Size?

The Psychology Behind It

If two objects are similar in size, we think that the one that casts a smaller retinal image is farther away. This is why you as the driver assume that the children are tiny because they are far away, not because they are actually small.

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You are walking through a haunted house filled with fog. You think that the vampire trying to scare you is farther away than he really is, so you walk right into him. You end up scaring the vampire instead. Name the reason for this.

what is relative clarity
What is Relative Clarity?

The Psychology Behind It

Light from objects far away passes through more atmosphere, so we think that hazy objects are farther away than sharp clear objects.

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You step up to your neighbors house to ring the doorbell. While waiting for an answer, you are mesmerized by the marquee of Halloween lights. While you are in a daze, some kids come up and steal all of your candy. Name this phenomenon.

what is the phi phenomenon
What is the Phi Phenomenon?

The Psychology Behind It

This illusion of movement makes it look like a single light is moving back and forth, when in reality it is simply two adjacent stationary lights quickly flickering on and off. This is why you see the impression of a marquee.

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The defenition of this word is: “a binocular cue for perceiving depth. The greater the inward strain, the closer the object.” (Myers 247)
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This concept is defined as “a laboratory device for testing depth perception in infants and young animals”(Myers 245)
what is gestalt
What is gestalt?

That’s a whole lot of organized Halloween candy!!

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This word is defined as “depth cues, such as interposition and linear perspective, available to either eye alone”(Myers 247)
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This word means: “a binocular cue for perceiving depth: by comparing images from the two eyeballs the brain computes distance- the greater the distance between the two images the closer the object”(Myers 247)

what is retinal disparity
What is retinal disparity?

Come on! We’ve gotta work together on this one…

what is proximity
What is proximity?

The Psychology Behind It:

Our brain tends to group near-by things together. Therefore, we don’t see six separate lines of dots in the picture, we see three groups of dots

what is similarity
What is similarity?

The Psychology Behind It:

We group together figures that look similar to each other. This is why we don’t see columns of alternating black and white dots, but rather rows of black dots and rows of white dots

what is connectedness
What is connectedness?

The Psychology Behind It:

Because they are uniform and linked, we perceive the two dots and the line as a single unit

what is continuity
What is continuity?

The Psychology Behind It:

We see smooth, continuous patterns instead of discontinuous ones. This is why we see connected shapes as opposed to a series of semi-circles and rectangles

what is closure
What is closure?

The Psychology Behind It:

Our brain fills in gaps to create a complete, whole object. We assume that there is an invisible triangle created (making a type of star) instead of just empty space

what is in perception the whole may exceed the sum of its parts
What is “in perception the whole may exceed the sum of its parts”?

The pumpkin exceeds the “sum” of its “parts” (even though pumpkin pie is clearly better than the actual pumpkin)

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One way to perceive what something is is to start with entry-level sensory analysis. Another way to perceive an object is to use your experiences and expectations. Name the two processes

what are bottom up processing and top down processing
What are bottom-up processing and top-down processing?

Bottom-up: The boy uses his senses to conclude that he is touching a pumpkin

Top-down: The boy uses his previous knowledge to understand that he is touching a pumpkin

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Richard L. Gregory thought that the corners in every day life teach us to interpret pointing arrowheads at the ends of a line as a cue to the lines distance from us which allows us to determine its length. Name the illusion