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Cinema-Style Television. UFVA - 2011 64 TH Anniversary of Cinema-Style Television 70 th Anniversary of Convergence. EIC . Entertainment Industry Caucus Professors with entertainment industry experience Share insights from firsthand experience Help professionals transition to academe.

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cinema style television

Cinema-Style Television

UFVA - 2011

64TH Anniversary of Cinema-Style Television

70th Anniversary of Convergence

slide2
EIC
  • Entertainment Industry Caucus
    • Professors with entertainment industry experience
    • Share insights from firsthand experience
    • Help professionals transition to academe
panel objectives
Panel Objectives
  • To encourage program structures and attitudes that mirror professional practice in order to prepare students for professional careers
  • To understand cinema’s future in a convergent world by looking at its past
panelists
Panelists
  • “Framing Cinema-Style Television”
  • Peter Kiwitt
  • Visiting Assistant Professor, RIT
  • (TV Director, Writer, Executive)
  • “The Evolution of Storytelling in American Television”
  • David Carren
  • Associate Professor, UT - Pan American
  • (TV Writer)
  • “Cinema and Television: The Career Swinging Door”
  • Diane Walsh
  • Associate Professor, University of the Arts
  • (TV Executive, Producer)
framing cinema style television

Framing Cinema-Style Television

Peter Kiwitt

http://peterkiwitt.wordpress.com

film or television
Film or Television?
  • Fantasy Island
film or television1
Film or Television?
  • Fantasy Island
  • Lost
semantic frame
Semantic Frame

“Radio Movies” (1923)

“Television film” . . . “Tele film” . . . “Telefilm” (1944)

“Episodic” (1971)

“Single-camera” (1972)

Also: “Hour” “Drama” “Film”

semantic frame1
Semantic Frame

“Cinema-style”

cinema style television1
Cinema-Style Television
  • Fantasy Island
  • Lost
conclusions
Conclusions
  • The cinema form is a production practice independent of content, technology, exhibition, budget, length, or aspect ratio.
  • As both a form and a medium, cinema transcends digital driven convergence.
  • Students interested in making cinema-style television and new media are best served by studying cinema production.
conclusions1
Conclusions
  • The cinema form is a production practice independent of content, technology, exhibition, budget, length, or aspect ratio.
  • As both a form and a medium, cinema transcends digital driven convergence.
  • Students interested in making cinema-style television and new media are best served by studying cinema production.
conclusions2
Conclusions
  • The cinema form is a production practice independent of content, technology, exhibition, budget, length, or aspect ratio.
  • As both a form and a medium, cinema transcends digital driven convergence.
  • Students interested in making cinema-style television and new media are best served by studying cinema production.
framing cinema style television1

Framing Cinema-Style Television

Peter Kiwitt

http://peterkiwitt.wordpress.com/what-is-cinema

semantic frame2
Semantic Frame

“Motion pictures” (1915)“Cinema” (1918)

“Film” (1920)

semantic frame3
Semantic Frame

“Television” (1900)“Radio vision” (1923)

“Radio movies” (1923)

selected chronology
Selected Chronology
  • 1878: First telephone Exchange; Telephonoscope cartoon
  • 1884: Paul Nipkow invents Nipkow disc (for mechanical TV)
  • 1895: “Trick” stop-camera in Mary Queen of Scots
  • 1894: C. Francis Jenkins projectS first moving images in US; he also publishes his first article on “transmitting pictures by electricity”
  • 1897: Joseph J. Thomson invents CRT (for electronic TV)
selected chronology1
Selected Chronology
  • 1900: ConstantinPerskyi coins “television” at the International Electricity Congress (translated from German to Russian to French to English)
  • 1906: Animation (Humorous Phases Of Funny Faces)
  • 1908: Traditional animation (Fantasmagorie)
  • 1916: Jenkins founds SMPE (becomes SMPTE in 1950)
  • 1920: Radio
selected chronology2
Selected Chronology
  • 1923: Jenkins articulates differences between “television,” “radio vision,” and “radio movies”
  • 1925: First public demonstrations of television (Baird and Jenkins).
  • 1928: First licensed experimental broadcasts (W2XB GE, W3XK Jenkins); David Sarnoff also predicts “radio television” and “radiomovies”
  • 1932: First experimental all electronic broadcasts (W3XE).
  • 1933: W6XAO airs original news film of earthquake
selected chronology3
Selected Chronology
  • 1939: First movie to air on TV (The Heart of New York)
  • 1941: Commercial broadcasting begins
  • 1944: MGM theatrical newsreel Patrolling the Ether premiers on TV
  • 1956: First practical videotape
  • 1965: First affordable consumer video; video art
selected chronology4
Selected Chronology
  • 1967: Portable consumer video; timecode editing introduced
  • 1973: 2D computer animation
  • 1976: 3D computer animation; portable broadcast video (field production)
  • 1986: Digital video
  • 2000: 24p video (Sony F900)
episodic
“Episodic . . .”
  • 1948: “. . . Series” (Radio)
  • 1968: “. . . Television” (All)
  • 1971: “. . . Series“ (Cinema)
  • 1974: “. . . Television” (Cinema)
  • 1983: “. . . Show” (Cinema)
  • 1986: “. . . Production” (Cinema)
single camera
“Single-Camera . . .”
  • 1961: “. . . Television” (Television)
  • 1969: “. . . Production” (Television?)
  • 1972: “. . . Film” (Cinema)
  • 1976: “. . . Show” (Television)
  • 1978: “. . . Show” (Cinema)
  • 1978: “. . . Television” (Cinema)
  • 1979: “. . . Production” (Cinema)
  • 1989: “. . . Series” (Cinema)
perspectives
Perspectives
  • Public
  • Professional
perspectives1
Perspectives
  • Public
  • Professional
      • Business
      • Studies
      • Production
perspectives2
Perspectives
  • Public
  • Professional
      • Business
      • Studies
      • Production
        • Academic/Artistic/Regional
        • Industry
perspectives3
Perspectives
  • Public
  • Professional
      • Business
      • Studies
      • Production
        • Academic/Artistic/Regional
        • Industry
perspectives4
Perspectives
  • Public
  • Professional
      • Business
      • Studies
      • Production
        • Academic/Artistic/Regional
        • Industry
perspectives5
Perspectives
  • Public
  • Professional
      • Business
      • Studies
      • Production
        • Academic/Artistic/Regional
        • Industry
slide58
Film
  • TECHNOLOGY: A flexible, transparent base with a photochemical emulsion.
slide59
Film
  • TECHNOLOGY: A flexible, transparent base with a photochemical emulsion.
  • FORM: Edited live-action moving images ideally emphasizing artistic form or content.
slide60
Film
  • TECHNOLOGY: A flexible, transparent base with a photochemical emulsion.
  • FORM: Edited live-action moving images ideally emphasizing artistic form or content.
  • MEDIUM: Linear venue-independent moving images shown to the public collectively.
slide61
Film
  • TECHNOLOGY: A flexible, transparent base with a photochemical emulsion.
  • FORM: Edited live-action moving images ideally emphasizing artistic form or content.
  • MEDIUM: Linear venue-independent moving images shown to the public collectively.
television
Television
  • TECHNOLOGY: A combination tuner, display, and speakers for moving images.
television1
Television
  • TECHNOLOGY: A combination tuner, display, and speakers for moving images.
  • FORM: Switched moving images as well as edited live-action moving images emphasizing communication.
television2
Television
  • TECHNOLOGY: A combination tuner, display, and speakers for moving images.
  • FORM: Switched moving images as well as edited live-action moving images emphasizing communication.
  • MEDIUM: Linear moving images shown to the public separately and simultaneously.
television3
Television
  • TECHNOLOGY: A combination tuner, display, and speakers for moving images.
  • FORM: Switched moving images as well as edited live-action moving images emphasizing communication.
  • MEDIUM: Linear moving images shown to the public separately and simultaneously.
cinema
Cinema
  • CINEMA:
    • A movie theater.
    • A synonym for film as a form and a medium.
cinema1
Cinema
  • CINEMA:
    • A movie theater.
    • A synonym for film as a form and a medium.
  • CINEMATIC: An adjective for describing positive visual qualities in cinema and in other forms when they emulate the positive qualities of cinema.
cinema2
Cinema
  • CINEMA:
    • A movie theater.
    • A synonym for film as a form and a medium.
  • CINEMATIC: An adjective for describing positive visual qualities in cinema and in other forms when they emulate the positive qualities of cinema.
  • CINEMA-STYLE: An adjective for describing the cinema form produced for other media.
cinema3
Cinema
  • CINEMA:
    • A movie theater.
    • A synonym for film as a form and a medium.
  • CINEMATIC: An adjective for describing positive visual qualities in cinema and in other forms when they emulate the positive qualities of cinema.
  • CINEMA-STYLE: An adjective for describing the cinema form produced for other media.
cinema form
Cinema Form
  • Smaller Scale Production
    • Documentary (Non-Fiction)
    • Experimental (Non-Narrative)
  • Larger Scale Production (Fictitious)
    • Narrative (features, series, shorts)
    • Music Video
    • Commercial/Corporate/Educational
narrative cinema
Narrative Cinema
  • Narrative cinema includes all edited fiction production regardless of technology, exhibition, budget, length, or aspect ratio.
narrative cinema1
Narrative Cinema
  • Narrative cinema includes all edited fiction production regardless of technology, exhibition, budget, length, or aspect ratio.
  • Therefore, everything from cinema-style television like Lost and The Office to many YouTube shorts have been and continue to be cinema.
narrative cinema2
Narrative Cinema
  • Narrative cinema includes all edited fiction production regardless of technology, exhibition, budget, length, or aspect ratio.
  • Therefore, everything from cinema-style television like Lost and The Office to many YouTube shorts have been and continue to be cinema.
primetime cinema style television
Primetime Cinema-Style Television
  • Traditionally:
    • Single-camera
    • Film
    • 7 days for 1 hour
    • Few Producers
    • 1 Director of Photography
  • Increasingly:
    • Multiple-camera (used in parallel)
    • Digital
    • 8+ days for 1 hour
    • Numerous Writer/Producers plus 1 Director/Producer
    • 2 Alternating Directors of Photography
live action1
Live-Action

Smaller Scale Cinema (1893)

live action2
Live-Action

Smaller-Scale Cinema (1893)

Larger-Scale Cinema (1907)

live action3
Live-Action

Smaller-Scale Cinema (1893)

Larger-Scale Cinema (1907)

Studio Television (1928)

live action4
Live-Action

Smaller-Scale Cinema (1893)

Larger-Scale Cinema (1907)

Studio Television (1941)

live action5
Live-Action

Smaller-Scale Cinema (1893)

Larger-Scale Cinema (1907)

Film-Style

Television (1949)

Television (1941)

live action6
Live-Action

Smaller-Scale Cinema (1893)

Larger-Scale Cinema (1907)

Field Television (1976)

Film-Style Studio Television (1949)

Studio Television (1941)

live action7
Live-Action

Smaller-Scale Cinema (1893)

Larger-Scale Cinema (1907)

Field Television (1976)

Film-Style Studio Television (1949)

Studio Television (1941)

live action8
Live-Action

Smaller-Scale Cinema (1893)

Larger-Scale Cinema (1907)

Field Television (1976)

Film-Style Studio Television (1949)

Studio Television (1941)