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Indoor Environmental Quality. Conquer Asthma – Assure Adequate Outside Air. THE BIG PICTURE… People spend most of their time indoors The indoor environment is generally not regulated.

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slide1

Indoor Environmental Quality

Conquer Asthma – Assure Adequate Outside Air

slide2

THE BIG PICTURE…

People spend most of their time indoors

The indoor environment is generally not regulated

slide3

Exposure to indoor allergens can lead to serious illness including asthma.Asthma is a leading chronic illness among U.S. children, and a leading cause of school absenteeism.

Source: CDC: Asthma Health Topic: www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/asthma

slide4

In 2005 the asthma incidence rate among children <18 years old was 8.9%1On average, in a classroom of 30 children, about 3 are likely to have asthma2

Sources: 1. National Health Interview Survey, 2005. CDC. 2. CDC: Asthma Health Topic: www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/asthma/

slide6

Dust Mites Molds

Animal Dander Pollen

Allergenic Chemicals

Allergen Exposure

Allergic Disease

Immunologic

Sensitization

Genetic

Predisposition

Or Susceptibility

Mild Moderate Severe

(Death)

Viruses

Air Pollution

Tobacco Smoke

Other Exposures

Adapted from: Indoor Allergens: Assessing and

Controlling Adverse Health Effects, N.A.P., 1993

slide7

Allergen

Adapted from: Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects, N.A.P., 1993

Initial exposure

Repeated exposure

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

IgE

Non-Sensitive

Host

Sensitized

Host

Hypersensitive

Host

No to Mild

Allergic Symptoms

Overt

Allergic Symptoms

No Allergic

Symptoms

slide13

Outdoor

air

Exhaust

Mix

Return air

Supply air

HVAC System in

Standard Classroom

slide14
HVAC = Sealed systemDetermines concentration of contaminantsIf not working well, particles and contaminant levels will increase
adequate classroom ventilation is needed to
Adequate classroom ventilation is needed to

Reduce the concentration of airborne contaminants such as CO2 and fine particles

Provide an adequate amount of fresh air to the occupants in the space

Effectively exchange the stale used air from the space

slide17

This is

a

Uni-vent

slide18

DO NOT

cover ceiling or

uni-vent openings

with books, papers

or other obstructions

slide19

Check for air circulation with a tissue strip on the end of a yardstick.

  • If air is not circulating, contact custodial services.
typical school particle contaminant sources
Typical school particle contaminant sources:

Pets: Animal dander, saliva, feces, urine

Things from outside: Pollen, insect parts

Mold: Old food or wet conditions in building

Dust mites: Stuffed couches, chairs and stuffed animals and fleecy items

slide21

Increased exposure to fine particles containing allergens or chemical contaminants may lead to illness or disease, especially asthma.

slide22
Fine dust particles are released:

By roughhousing on the donated couch

By resident animals

By walking on carpeting

By moving dust or dusty items

slide23
If not removed by circulated fresh air, picked up by dusting or removed by quality vacuuming or carpet extraction, particles (allergens) build up in the space and increase exposure to occupants.
some things you expect as contaminant sources
Some things you expect as contaminant sources:

Cleaning supplies

Pesticides

Lab chemicals

Art supplies

Dry erase pens, smelly markers

other things you may not expect as contaminant sources
Other things you may not expect as contaminant sources:

Candles

Plug-ins

Perfume

Hair spray

Ionizing or Ozone producing“Air Purifiers”

slide29

What can you do?

Advocate a policy limiting chemicals brought from home

For example:

  • Hair sprays
  • Perfumes
  • Cleaners
  • Plug-ins
  • Candles
slide30

What can you do to help keep the classroom clean?

Help your custodian to do a

great job for you!!

slide31

How to help the custodian:

Before you dismiss your class, have your students clear the floor around their desks and place their chairs on their desks or stack them.This makes it easier for the custodian to vacuum and allows for cleaning of horizontal surfaces - removing dust.

slide32

Other helps:

Use dust free storage such as stackable plastic cubes for books and papers

Clear horizontal surfaces so these may be easily wiped down

Conduct messy projects over tiled room sections or protect carpeting with tarps

slide33

What to do next:

Talk to your association representative

Learn about safety committees

Learn about IEQ committees

More information is available on the WEA web site