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2. LONG RANGE,UNIT, AND LESSON PLANNING

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2. LONG RANGE,UNIT, AND LESSON PLANNING

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  1. 2. LONG RANGE,UNIT, AND LESSON PLANNING Each type of planning focuses on a different timeline and purpose.

  2. All 3 types of planning are critical to effective instruction. • The Education Act requires that Long Range Plans be available in the school office for parentviewing upon request ( usually required by September 30th of the current school year). • During the Performance Appraisal Cycle, or when concerns about performance arise, administrators will ask to see unit and lesson plans. • Be sure to include your E.A. in your plan for the day.

  3. LONG TERM PLANNING • Sometimes referred to as Long Range or Course Planning. • Shows an overview of the course, or integrated courses, for the full year. • Helps you to determine and book resources, volunteers, excursions, etc. • Keeps you moving ahead!

  4. UNIT PLANNING • More detailed than a Long Range Plan • Starts with the ends in mind….first identify how you will have students demonstrate their learning (called backward design). • Includes Overall Expectations, Specific Expectations, Assessment Strategies, Resources, and Instructional Strategies. • Is flexible….plans are just a guideline!

  5. Teach to Kids! • Natural shift during your career • Adjust plans as you go along to reflect needs and interests. • Use unit plans as a guide, not a bible. • Reflect on plans and add to them after finishing, or while working in, each unit. • Share with colleagues! Plan together!

  6. LESSON PLANS • Provide day by day detailed plans about each of your lessons. • Evolve in style as you gain experience and confidence (e.g., from several pages to several words). • Include time for mini-lessons as needed throughout the day. • Start with the end in mind…consider first how you will ask students to demonstrate theirlearning and move ahead with plans once that is decided.

  7. LESSON PLANS • Should include: - an introduction, “hook”, or mental set - a clear indication of the learningexpectations ( stated in an age appropriate way) - body of the lesson (input, modeling and demonstration, guided practice followed by independent practice) - a conclusion or closing

  8. LESSON PLANS • Should always be guided by the “PHASES OF INSTRUCTION” MOTIVATION NEW LEARNING CONSOLIDATION APPLICATION

  9. LESSON PLANS • MOTIVATION - 3 to 5 minutes - create interest - connect this lesson to past learning - be clear about what students will know or be able to do at the end of this lesson, and why that has value

  10. LESSON PLANS • NEW LEARNING - model, model , model - review throughout the lesson, constantly cycling back to ensure new concepts and ideas are clear - ensure that everyone is involved - keep the lesson input as short and brisk as possible - involve as many senses as possible - keep ACTIVE LEARNING in mind as you progress through the lesson; design your input to appeal various types of learners (i.e., auditory, visual, kinesthetic, etc)

  11. CONSOLIDATION • This is time to practice the new learning in “near” contexts. • You scaffold the learning during this time. • Monitor closely…the more time students spend practising doing something the wrong way, the more time you will spend un-teaching and re-teaching. • Provide several closely monitored opportunities for this type of practice. • Make anecdotal notes about progress and needs as you supervise. • Use this time to teach mini-lessons to individuals orsmall groups who didn’t grasp the new learning during your first lesson.

  12. APPLICATION • Keep in mind that the learning hasn’t happened until the student can use it independently. • Provide structured time to practise the new learning in “far” contexts. • Gradually release responsibility for learning…scaffold from a more removed position. • Provide a wide variety of contexts for use of the new skill. • Involve students in assessing the extent of their learning. • This part of the lesson (or sequence of lessons) should take the most time. • Include remediate and enrichment applications.

  13. APPLICATION • Keep in mind that learning is, and should be, hard work… • So, if you find yourself working harder than you feel your students are…it’s time to re-evaluate your approach.

  14. TIMELINE FOR PHASES OF INSTRUCTION • Time needed will vary depending on the complexity of the expectation. • Motivation and New Learning should take a relatively short amount of time: - 10-20 minutes in Primary grades - 20-30 minutes in Junior grades

  15. TIMELINE FOR PHASES OF INSTRUCTION • CONSOLIDATION and APPLICATION phases should take up the majority of time in a lesson or series of related lessons • Your role changes from “teller/shower” to “guide/assessor” as the phases of instruction progress.