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Rule #1 PowerPoint Presentation

Rule #1

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Rule #1

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  1. Rule #1 Also known as Daryl’s words to live by.

  2. Those really weird calls • Once every couple of months or so we get those really weird service calls. • The problem never happens when we’re there. For that matter, the equipment always seems to be working fine. • What should we check first? What could it possibly be? • Is the unit possessed?

  3. KISS eep T imple tupid

  4. Start with the basics! • Assume nothing, check everything, no matter how unrelated it may seem. • Forget everything that’s been done in the past service calls. • Check low voltage connections, check line voltage connections. Check voltages. • Check pressures, cycle it on the thermostat. Cycle it on the safeties. Drop out a motor.

  5. Start with the basics! • Wiggle wires, jiggle connections and look everywhere. • Ignore your urges, remember that the last guy did what you’re considering and look how productive that was. • What are you looking for? Won’t know til’ ya find it.

  6. Start with the basics! • This is probably not one where you’ll get to use your new nuclear powered, fully digital analog read out, voice activated microprocessor ACME 1000 meter. • Nope, this one will be solved with a pressure gauge at best. Probably a screw driver or a pair of pliers.

  7. KISS eep T imple tupid

  8. Heat Pump Systems

  9. In the cooling mode, heat pumps work the same as cooling only units. As the air is drawn across the indoor coil, the refrigerant absorbs the heat (energy) from it. The heat now trapped in the refrigerant is carried outdoors by the refrigerant. As the hot gas refrigerant condenses, it gives off the heat from indoors.

  10. In the cooling mode, heat pumps work the same as cooling only units. As the air is drawn across the indoor coil, the refrigerant absorbs the heat (energy) from it. The heat now trapped in the refrigerant is carried outdoors by the refrigerant. As the hot gas refrigerant condenses, it gives off the heat from indoors.

  11. In the cooling mode, heat pumps work the same as cooling only units. As the air is drawn across the indoor coil, the refrigerant absorbs the heat (energy) from it. The heat now trapped in the refrigerant is carried outdoors by the refrigerant. As the hot gas refrigerant condenses, it gives off the heat from indoors.

  12. In the cooling mode, heat pumps work the same as cooling only units. As the air is drawn across the indoor coil, the refrigerant absorbs the heat (energy) from it. The heat now trapped in the refrigerant is carried outdoors by the refrigerant. As the hot gas refrigerant condenses, it gives off the heat from indoors.

  13. In the cooling mode, heat pumps work the same as cooling only units. As the air is drawn across the indoor coil, the refrigerant absorbs the heat (energy) from it. The heat now trapped in the refrigerant is carried outdoors by the refrigerant. As the hot gas refrigerant condenses, it gives off the heat from indoors.

  14. In the cooling mode, heat pumps work the same as cooling only units. As the air is drawn across the indoor coil, the refrigerant absorbs the heat (energy) from it. The heat now trapped in the refrigerant is carried outdoors by the refrigerant. As the hot gas refrigerant condenses, it gives off the heat from indoors.

  15. In the cooling mode, heat pumps work the same as cooling only units. As the air is drawn across the indoor coil, the refrigerant absorbs the heat (energy) from it. The heat now trapped in the refrigerant is carried outdoors by the refrigerant. As the hot gas refrigerant condenses, it gives off the heat from indoors.

  16. In the cooling mode, heat pumps work the same as cooling only units. As the air is drawn across the indoor coil, the refrigerant absorbs the heat (energy) from it. The heat now trapped in the refrigerant is carried outdoors by the refrigerant. As the hot gas refrigerant condenses, it gives off the heat from indoors.

  17. In the cooling mode, heat pumps work the same as cooling only units. As the air is drawn across the indoor coil, the refrigerant absorbs the heat (energy) from it. The heat now trapped in the refrigerant is carried outdoors by the refrigerant. As the hot gas refrigerant condenses, it gives off the heat from indoors.

  18. In the cooling mode, heat pumps work the same as cooling only units. As the air is drawn across the indoor coil, the refrigerant absorbs the heat (energy) from it. The heat now trapped in the refrigerant is carried outdoors by the refrigerant. As the hot gas refrigerant condenses, it gives off the heat from indoors.

  19. In the heating mode of operation, the refrigerant flow is reversed.

  20. In the heating mode, the heat pump is absorbing the heat (energy) from the air. The outdoor coil is now acting as the evaporator coil. The indoor coil being the condenser coil, releasing the heat from the refrigerant to the indoor air.

  21. In the heating mode, the heat pump is absorbing the heat (energy) from the air. The outdoor coil is now acting as the evaporator coil. The indoor coil being the condenser coil, releasing the heat from the refrigerant to the indoor air.

  22. In the heating mode, the heat pump is absorbing the heat (energy) from the air. The outdoor coil is now acting as the evaporator coil. The indoor coil being the condenser coil, releasing the heat from the refrigerant to the indoor air.

  23. In the heating mode, the heat pump is absorbing the heat (energy) from the air. The outdoor coil is now acting as the evaporator coil. The indoor coil being the condenser coil, releasing the heat from the refrigerant to the indoor air.

  24. In the heating mode, the heat pump is absorbing the heat (energy) from the air. The outdoor coil is now acting as the evaporator coil. The indoor coil being the condenser coil, releasing the heat from the refrigerant to the indoor air.

  25. In the heating mode, the heat pump is absorbing the heat (energy) from the air. The outdoor coil is now acting as the evaporator coil. The indoor coil being the condenser coil, releasing the heat from the refrigerant to the indoor air.

  26. In the heating mode, the heat pump is absorbing the heat (energy) from the air. The outdoor coil is now acting as the evaporator coil. The indoor coil being the condenser coil, releasing the heat from the refrigerant to the indoor air.

  27. In the heating mode, the heat pump is absorbing the heat (energy) from the air. The outdoor coil is now acting as the evaporator coil. The indoor coil being the condenser coil, releasing the heat from the refrigerant to the indoor air.

  28. In the heating mode, the heat pump is absorbing the heat (energy) from the air. The outdoor coil is now acting as the evaporator coil. The indoor coil being the condenser coil, releasing the heat from the refrigerant to the indoor air.

  29. In the heating mode, the heat pump is absorbing the heat (energy) from the air. The outdoor coil is now acting as the evaporator coil. The indoor coil being the condenser coil, releasing the heat from the refrigerant to the indoor air.

  30. In the heating mode, the heat pump is absorbing the heat (energy) from the air. The outdoor coil is now acting as the evaporator coil. The indoor coil being the condenser coil, releasing the heat from the refrigerant to the indoor air.

  31. Heat Pump Classification • Heat pumps are classified by the medium used for heating while in the heating mode. • Most residential units are air to air. Meaning they use air (the outdoor air) as their source of heat when heating. • Another common type found in light commercial applications, is the water source heat pump.

  32. Heat Pump Classification • There is heat (energy) present to minus 480º F. Most current heat pumps can perform efficiently to 20º F. • The need for supplemental heat will depend on the design condition and the building’s construction. • The colder the outdoor ambient, the greater the heating demand is. With less heat in the outdoor air, the heat pump loses capacity.

  33. INSIDE THE HEAT PUMP • COMPRESSOR CAPABLE OF OPERATING AT LOW OUTDOOR TEMPERATURES • INDOOR / OUTDOOR COIL DESIGN • METERING DEVICE FOR INDOOR / OUTDOOR COIL • REVERSING VALVE ( 4-WAY VALVE ) • ACCUMULATOR • CRANKCASE HEATER • AUXILIARY HEAT • EMERGENCY HEAT • DEFROST CYCLE

  34. HEAT PUMP • ACCUMULATOR: • CLIMATUFF Reciprocating - PART OF COMPRESSOR SHELL • LOCATED IN SUCTION LINE BETWEEN THE COMPRESSOR AND REVERSING VALVE • WHY HAVE ONE? • MOST IMPORTANT: • HEATING CYCLE - COLD TEMPERATURES, OUT DOOR COIL MAY NOT BE ABLE TO EVAPORATE ALL THE REFRIGERANT • END OF DEFROST CYCLE • LIQUID CARRYOVER WILL BE CAUGHT BY THE ACCUMULATOR TO PREVENT COMPRESSOR DAMAGE

  35. From Reversing Valve To compressor Vapor & liquid refrigerant Vapor refrigerant Liquid refrigerant Oil return orifice

  36. WHAT MAKES A HEAT PUMP UNIQUE • SPECIAL COMPRESSOR • MUCH HIGHER COMPRESSION RATIO • MOST SEVERE APPLICATION • HEAT PUMP COILS • ALTERNATELY FUNCTION AS EVAPORATOR AND CONDENSER • MUST TOLERATE CHARGE IMBALANCE • OUT DOOR COIL MUST BE DESIGNIED FOR EASY DEFROST

  37. HEAT PUMP • CRANKCASE HEATER • LOCATED ON COMPRESSOR, OLDER SYSTEMS USED COMPRESSOR WINDINGS. • RAISES TEMPERATURE OF OIL SO THAT THE ABSORPTION OF REFRIGERANT INTO THE COMPRESSOR IS KEPT TO A MINIMUM

  38. HEAT PUMP THE REVERSING VALVE CONTROLS THE DIRECTION THE REFRIGERANT FLOWS

  39. COOLING CONDITION INDOOR COIL SAT. SUCT. T. 41F ENT. AIR T. 76F 4-WAY VALVE SUCT. P. 70 PSIG SUCT. T. 52F SUPERHEAT 11F METERING DEVICE SUBCOOLING 10F DISCHARGE PRESSURE 260 PSIG OUTDOOR COIL SAT. COND. T. 120F ENT. AIR T. 90F COMPRESSOR

  40. HEATING CONDITIONS INDOOR COIL SAT. COND. T. 95F ENT. AIR T. 70F 4-WAY VALVE METERING DEVICE SUBCOOLING 10F SUCT. P. 43 PSIG SUCT. T. 35F SUPERHEAT 10F DISCHARGE PRESSURE 182 PSIG OUTDOOR COIL SAT. SUCT. T. 20F ENT. AIR T. 45F COMPRESSOR

  41. Break Time!

  42. What to look at inside • The two most important checks to perform while inside are cycle rate and fan speed/air flow. • Thermostats with adjustable heat anticipation need to have it adjusted for proper operation! • We had to see what air handler the system is matched up with to check our charge, to check the blower motor speed tap will only take another few minutes.

  43. What to look at inside • One of the most important steps we can do while inside the home, is briefly review normal heat pump operation with the consumer! (what to expect) • Even if the consumer has had a heat pump in the past, reviewing things like demand defrost, thermostat set back, and what happens in a defrost cycle with newer equipment will make for a happier customer.

  44. System air flow • The blower speed must be set for the proper operation of the outdoor section. • A system with operating pressures that will not match up to those listed on the charging chart probably has an air flow problem. • The more the refrigerant pressures match up to the charging chart, the closer the air flow is to that listed on the charging chart.

  45. System air flow • A system moving too much air will have a low temperature rise and possibly defrost problems. • A system moving too little air will act as a mismatched application. Requiring refrigerant be removed in the fall and added in the spring.

  46. System match up Not in your books • System selection should always be done with the manufacturers equipment selection guide. • Coil capacity and air flow are critical in this selection. • The outdoor coil should never exceed the indoor coil volume by more than a two to one ratio!