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CKEC ELA Network Meeting

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  1. CKEC ELA Network Meeting September 27th 2012

  2. Welcome back!

  3. Norms for Professional Learning 1 3 2 Ask Questions & Engage Fully Utilize your learning Open your mind to diverse views Rule of two feet; please silent cell phones; return from breaks promptly

  4. Who’s on your facilitation team? • MK Hardaway, KDE Literacy Consultant • Marci Haydon, Instructional Coach at Old Kentucky Home Middle School • Les Burns, Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction at UK • Lisa King, CKSEC Literacy Consultant

  5. Shameless Plug • Kay.hardaway@education.ky.gov

  6. Learning Target • I can use careful planning to improve instruction in order to be a more effective teacher and leader.

  7. Brainstorm • What do you do when you plan? What do you think about and consider?

  8. Today’s Guiding Questions • 1. What do you do when you plan? • 2. What format/basis do you use for planning? • 3. What text(s)? • 4. What strategies? • 5. How do you know it’s effective?

  9. What strategies? • Instructional Strategies & the Role of Co-teaching

  10. Improving Instruction in Order to be a More Effective Teacher and Leader

  11. What does a lesson plan HAVE to have in order to help students succeed? • Commit and Toss (5 minutes) • List elements you think are essential to a “good” lesson plan • Crumple it up and toss it to someone at the next table • Quick Write (5 minutes) • Choose one response, read it, expand and/or clarify. • Think/Pair/Share (5 minutes) • Exchange with your neighbor, read, and discuss. • Add details if needed, and be ready to share with the whole group.

  12. Lesson Plans as “Design Thinking” • Asking questions • Collecting information (Data! Data?) • Empathizing (relevance) • Prototyping • Gathering feedback • Re-designing (sometimes DURING the process, sometimes AFTER) • Assessment and Iteration: Recursive design • From Dr. John Nash, University of Kentucky

  13. Why Do “Research-Based” Instructional Strategies Matter? • Senate Bill 1 – “Research-based instructional strategies” • Specific, systematic approaches for teaching, organizing classrooms, engaging students, and assessing their learning • Documented via scientific research (e.g., CHETL) • So what? What does this REALLY mean to ME in MY classroom and OUR school?

  14. Existing Design Tools • KTIP Format • School-level templates • Target-Activity-Assessment • LDC Templates/Ladders • CHETL • CASL • ACT Quality Core • Model Texts • Question Banks • EOC assessments • Springboard/AP • Laying the Foundations • Other Paced, structured, and/or prescribed curriculum

  15. Are Sweet Dreams Made of These?OrIf I Had a Hammer…. • Tools • You can use them • You can get used by them • Standardization • Innovation • Balance via teacher decision making • Grounded in research • Research-based instruction • Classroom/student data

  16. Formative Assessments as Scaffolding • Learning the Curves • The Bell Curve • “Normal” or “Positive”? • The ultimate purposes of formative assessments – • Data-driven Teaching…. • A plan is a guide, not a recipe! • Sequencing routines and tasks to maximize student success

  17. Sequencing Learning Tasks

  18. You Got This:Common Scaffolding Frames • The Hunter Model: • Objective • Gateway • Instruction • Practice • Assessment • Rinse and Repeat • 3 E’s Method: • Enter • Explore • Expand • The Pronoun Method: • I (direct instruction) • We (large group collab.) • You (small group collab.) • You 1 (indiv. practice) • We 2 (group review) • You 1 (indiv. assessment)

  19. Why Does This Matter? One Scientific Approach: • The Engagement Perspective: 6 Conditions • Clear learning goals for students • Routines and “cognitive load” • Taking out the guess-work • Explicit strategy instruction and practice • Variety and Choice within structure • A Note about “Relevance” – Relevance to what/whom? • Collaboration opportunities • Real-world interactions • Teacher caring and high expectations • .80 Correlation with Increased Student Achievement • Almost perfect! 

  20. Scaffolded Lesson Plans • Can last more than 1 day • 1-2 learning targets at a time • Explicitly linked to past content, practice, and discussion • Introduce new content (via inquiry and/or direct instruction) • Use clear, explicit, purposefully chosen teaching strategies • Are implemented via relevant learning tasks • (Formative assessments) • Highlight student use of concepts and skills • Summative assessment can be at end of lesson and/or end of unit • Sequenced in some logical way and explicit to students

  21. Strategies for Writing InstructionReview of Writing Next (Graham & Perrin, 2007) • Teaching adolescents strategies for planning, revising, and editing their compositions has shown a dramatic effect on the quality of students’ writing. • Strategy instruction involves explicitlyand systematicallyteaching steps necessary for planning, revising, and/or editing text (Graham, 2006).

  22. Proven Strategies for Improving Student Writing • Strategy instruction (Effect Size = 0.82) • Summarization (Effect Size = 0.82) • Collaborative writing (Effect Size = 0.75) • Specific product goals (Effect Size = 0.70) • Word processing (Effect Size = 0.55) • Sentence combining (Effect Size = 0.50) • Pre-writing (Effect Size = 0.32) • Inquiry activities (Effect Size = 0.32) • Writing process (Effect Size = 0.32) • Models (Effect Size = 0.25)

  23. 11. Grammar Instruction? • The Writing First authors found a statistically significant effect for grammar instruction for students across all ability groups • The effect was negative. • Indicates that traditional grammar instruction is does not improve students’ writing. It prevents improvement.

  24. What Works for You? An Idea Exchange • Describe a lesson you have taught that you believe was scaffolded well. What made it work? • Instructional Strategies? • Routines? • Relevant or engaging resources? • Sequencing? • Other • Reflect and Revise: • How will you use information to refine your LDC ladders and tasks? • How do these techniques and strategies align with CHETL?

  25. Scaffolding Instruction with Coteaching Models

  26. One Teach/One Assist Shadowing Eight Co-Teaching Approaches

  27. One Teach/One Assist Shadowing Speak/Add Speak/Chart 8 Co-Teaching Approaches Lead and Support One Teach/One Observe

  28. One Teach/One Assist Shadowing Speak/Add Speak/Chart 8 Co-Teaching Approaches Lead and Support One Teach/One Observe Skill Groups

  29. One Teach/One Assist Shadowing Speak/Add Speak/Chart 8 Co-Teaching Approaches Lead and Support One Teach/One Observe Skill Groups Alternative Teaching

  30. One Teach/One Assist Shadowing Speak/Add Speak/Chart 8 Co-Teaching Approaches Lead and Support One Teach/One Observe Skill Groups Alternative Teaching Station Teaching

  31. One Teach/One Assist Shadowing Speak/Add Speak/Chart 8 Co-Teaching Approaches Lead and Support One Teach/One Observe Skill Groups Alternative Teaching Station Teaching Parallel Teaching

  32. “Who’s role is it anyway?”

  33. Using Coteaching with the Instructional Ladder • Look at your instructional ladder. • Select one whole group coteaching model and one small group coteaching model. • When on the instructional ladder would you use the model/ with which strategy? • Share your decisions at your table. With an elbow partner:

  34. How will what you just heard about scaffolding and coteaching impact your teaching during the LDC module?

  35. Strategies for Complex Textwww.textproject.org/text-matters

  36. Create Connections • Use videos, poems, analogies, student interests • Set a purpose for reading • Anticipation Guide • Turning Headings into questions • Give students a way to organize knowledge • T-chart • Guided Notes • Story or Concept Map • Connect them to additional sources on the same subject • Opportunities for sharing their knowledge

  37. Activate Their Passion • Choice • Topics • Three or more books on a topic

  38. Develop Vocabulary • 90% of words in text come from 4,00 word families • 10% are unique words • Network of words that kids know • Explicit instruction in Content areas • Narrative text more difficult

  39. Word Reminders • Words you already know • Words you can picture • Word meaning families • Word part family • Word Changes • Word Summary

  40. Exceptional Expressions for Everyday Events= E4

  41. Follow-Up questions • How is listening different from hearing? • What are some things we can do to help others listen to our ideas?

  42. Instructional ideas • Weekly focus word and word cluster • Word features weekly • Time to apply the words • Intensity • Ask----------------Interrogate • Question, inquire, interview, quiz and probe • Can I draw it? Courageous • Describe it in a sentence • 7up sentences

  43. Increase Volume and Build Stamina 7 Minute Challenge

  44. Reading Stamina “Students who fail to attain national standards, can read but don’t have the rigorous reading habits needed tor read long text or to remember and transfer learning from one text to another.” Accessible Text!!

  45. BREAK 10:30-10:40

  46. How do you know it’s effective? • Characteristics of Highly Effective Teaching and Learning (CHETL) & Professional Growth and Effectiveness System (PGES)

  47. CHETL • Learning Climate • Classroom Assessment and Reflection • Instructional Rigor and Student Engagement • Instructional Relevance • Knowledge of Content

  48. PGES Professional Growth and Effectiveness System