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  1. Family, Income and CrimeUniversity of MontevideoSept. 28, 2006 Patrick F. Fagan The Heritage Foundation

  2. The Five Institutions

  3. Note: Figures do not include transferred income.

  4. {

  5. Impact of Divorce on Income of Families 1993 Average Annual Income $50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 Before Divorce After Divorce Family Status Source: Corcoran and Chaudray, Unpublished Research Paper, Survey Research Center, University of Michigan, May 1994

  6. Schema: Having Vs Belonging in the US

  7. EDUCATION

  8. Grade Point Average Grade Point Average (Out of Maximum of 4.0) 3.1 3.0 2.9 2.8 2.7 2.6 2.5 2.4 Intact Married Parents Cohabiting Parents Step Parents Always Single Parents Divorced Parents Family Structure Source: National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health Wave 1, 1995

  9. School Expulsion Source Add Health Wave II 1996

  10. ABUSE, First CRIME, Later

  11. In Britain, a Child Whose Biological Mother Cohabits was 33 Times More Likely to Suffer Serious Abuse than a Child with Married Parents Comparative Risk Ratios for Serious Abuse, 1982-1988 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 Mother Married to Stepfather Biological Mother Alone Biological Parents Cohabiting Biological Father Alone Biological Mother Cohabiting Biological Parents Married Family Structure Source: Robert Whelan, Broken Homes and Broken Children, 1994.

  12. In Britain, a Child Whose Biological Mother Cohabits was 73 Times More Likely to Suffer Fatal Abuse than a Child with Married Parents Comparative Risk Ratios for Serious Abuse, 1982-1988 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 Mother Married to Stepfather Biological Mother Alone Biological Parents Cohabiting Biological Father Alone Biological Mother Cohabiting Biological Parents Married Family Structure Source: Robert Whelan, Broken Homes and Broken Children, 1994.

  13. Runaway Children in UK Step-Families Lone-parent Families Two-parent Families 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% Percentage of children running away overnight before the age of 16

  14. CRIME CITIZENSHIP