Taxing Liquid Sugar: The lowdown on the sugar-sweetened beverage tax - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Taxing Liquid Sugar: The lowdown on the sugar-sweetened beverage tax

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  1. Taxing Liquid Sugar:The lowdown on the sugar-sweetened beverage tax

  2. The Problem: Obesity in the U.S. • Americans consume too much sugar. Over the years, our consumption has significantly increased.

  3. The Problem: Obesity in the U.S. • The more sugar we consume, the more our national waistline increases.

  4. Obesity Trends in the U.S. 1985 No Data <10% 10%–14%

  5. Obesity Trends in the U.S.: 1990 No Data <10% 10%–14%

  6. Obesity Trends in the U.S.: 1995 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

  7. Obesity Trends in the U.S.: 2000 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%

  8. Obesity Trends in the U.S.: 2005 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

  9. Obesity Trends in the U.S.: 2008 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

  10. Sugar Sweetened Beverages: A Big Part of the Problem • The average American consumes around 50 gallons of sugary bevs each year. This is equal to 41 pounds of sugar and about 72,000 calories. • Research has found a link between obesity and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. • For example, a recently study in San Francisco found that around 8.7% of the city’s obesity rates could be attributed to consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages.

  11. Sugar-sweetenedbeverages are thesingle biggestcontributor to thenation’s obesityepidemic. • Source: Bleich, SN, Wang YC, Wang Y, Gortmaker SL: Increasing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among USadults: 1988-1994 to 1999-2004. Am J ClinNutr 2009; 89: 372:381.

  12. Smoothie King Peanut Power + Grape • Large (40oz) • 1,498 calories • 44 grams fat • 214 grams of sugar • Sugar equivalent=20 Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups

  13. Instead… try a High Protein Banana Smoothie • 16 oz • 322 calories • 8 grams of fat • 23 grams of sugar

  14. McDonald’s Large Triple Thick Chocolate Shake • 1,160 calories • 27 grams of fat • 168 grams of sugar • Sugar equivalent = 13 Baked Hot Apple Pies

  15. Instead of the Triple Thick Shake… try McDonald’s Hot Fudge Sundae • 340 calories • 12 grams of fat • 47 grams of sugar

  16. DQ Caramel Moolatte • 870 Calories • 24 grams of fat • 112 grams of sugar • Sugar equivalent =100 frosted animal crackers

  17. Instead of a Moolatte… have a Dilly Bar! • 210 calories • 13 grams of fat • 17 grams of sugar

  18. Starbucks Venti Java Chip Frappuccino • 510 calories • 13 grams of fat • 77 grams of sugar • Sugar equivalent = 3.5 large chocolate chip cookies

  19. Starbuck’s White Hot Chocolate • 520 calories • 16 grams of fat • 75 grams of sugar • Sugar equivalent = 14 Oreos

  20. Cold Stone CreameryPB & C Shake • 2,010 calories • 131 grams of fat • 153 grams of sugar • Sugar equivalent=30 Chips Ahoy Cookies

  21. Instead of a PB & C…drink a Sinless Oh Fudge Shake • “Like it” size • 490 calories • 2 grams of fat • 44 grams of sugar

  22. Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Youth • Marketers of soda and sugary beverages aggressively target youth. • Soda accounts for about 10% of total calories the average kid consumers in a day • Kids who drink a lot of soda don’t get enough of important nutrients like folate, vitamin A, and calcium.

  23. Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Youth • Research has also shown that youth are particularly more likely to reduce consumption upon increase in price. • The obesity rate for kids in around 17.5%. • Another study observed middle-school students over two school years, and concluded that their risk of obesity skyrocketed 60% for every additional sugary drink they consumed a day.

  24. Potential Solution: Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax • What this means: A tax on all sugar-sweetened beverages, including (non-diet) sodas, sweetened teas, fruit drinks, sports drinks, etc… • Currently, 33 states have minor SSB taxes – but the taxes aren’t significant enough to create change.

  25. Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax • Research demonstrates, and tobacco taxes prove, that raising the price of unhealthy foods will most likely lead to reduced consumption • Consequently, this tax could help reduce adult and childhood obesity. • Additionally, money generated from the tax can be used to further promote public health efforts in the U.S. Even if a tax of only 3 cents a soda was imposed, it could raise $51.6 billion in the next 10 years. • This is needed, for obesity-related health problems cost America about $117 billion each year.

  26. Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax: Campaign Example • New York state’s Pour on the Pounds campaign • www.youtube.com/user/DrinkingFat

  27. Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax: Campaign Example

  28. Time to Play… • GUESS THE SUGAR CONTENT!

  29. Rockstar

  30. Sugar Content? 62 grams of sugar

  31. Naked Berry Blast

  32. Sugar Content? 52 grams of sugar

  33. Izze Sparkling Clementine

  34. Sugar Content? 27 grams of sugar

  35. Starbucks Double Shot

  36. Sugar Content? 26 grams of sugar

  37. Nos

  38. Sugar Content? 52 grams of sugar

  39. SoBePina Colada

  40. Sugar Content? 77.5 Grams of Sugar

  41. Mountain Dew

  42. Sugar Content? 77 grams of sugar

  43. Gatorade Fruit Punch

  44. Sugar Content? 56 grams of sugar

  45. Fuze- Strawberry Guava

  46. Sugar Content? 44 grams of sugar

  47. Full Throttle

  48. Sugar Content? 58 grams of sugar