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America’s Children and Young Adults – The Expectations and Experiences of a Generation. Miller/Cook & Associates, Inc. Generational Cohorts. The people we are born with, travel through life with, and experience critical events with at the time of late adolescence and early adulthood.

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america s children and young adults the expectations and experiences of a generation

America’s Children and Young Adults – The Expectations and Experiences of a Generation

Miller/Cook & Associates, Inc.

generational cohorts
Generational Cohorts
  • The people we are born with, travel through life with, and experience critical events with at the time of late adolescence and early adulthood.
  • At the heart of the cohort group concept is the hypothesis that events that are happening when we are coming of age imprint core values.
generation x now 31 42 years of age

Generation X Now 31-42 Years of Age

The Parents of 40 million American Children

in the words of kurt cobain
In the words of Kurt Cobain
  • “Here we are now, entertain us / I feel stupid and contagious”
generation x childhood experiences
Generation X childhood experiences
  • The first generation with large numbers raised in broken homes
  • 1/3 have divorced parents (compared with 13% of baby-boomers)
  • Latchkey Children
  • 50% had working mothers
now parents themselves
Now parents themselves
  • U.S. men now marry for the first time at a median age of 27 (up from 22 in 1960)
  • U.S. women now marry for the fist time at a median age of 25 (up from 20 in 1960)
  • Generation X is now raising more than half of all children under 18 in the United States (40 million children)
life priorities of gen x parents
Life Priorities of Gen X Parents
  • Gen X moms and dads tend to be homebodies - they are willing to sacrifice one spouse's income to have a parent at home with the kids.
  • Sometimes they choose arrangements, such as each spouse working a part-time job, that ensure that both parents get time with the children.
research consistently reports that
Research consistently reports that…
  • 67 percent of Xer moms said they planned to do a better job of raising their children than the generation before them.
  • For the first time in decades, fewer women are returning to the workforce in the first year after giving birth.
  • 25% of Generation X moms spend 12 hours-plus a day on child rearing, more than double the time spent by baby-boomer moms.
  • Roughly half of Gen-X fathers devote three to six hours a day to domesticity; only 39 percent of baby-boomer dads could say the same.
and there s more
And, there’s more…
  • The job characteristic most often ranked as very important by men between the ages of 21-39 is “having a work schedule which allows me to spend time with my family” (Radcliffe Public Policy Center)
  • Some 70% of the Public Policy Center’s male respondents wanted to spend more time with their families and were willing to sacrifice pay to do so.
yet in other substantive ways generation x has not changed
Yet, in other substantive ways, Generation X has not changed
  • Traits of independence, resilience, and adaptability remain.
  • Expect immediate and ongoing feedback
  • Equally comfortable giving feedback to others
it is no surprise that there is no single guru for generation x parenting
It is no surprise that there is no single guru for Generation X parenting
  • Lactation Consultants
  • Mother’s Groups
  • Websites
  • Parenting Centers
  • Books
  • Blogs
  • Father’s Groups
substantive change

Substantive Change

Private Schools – at all levels of the educational pipeline – are no longer in control of the conversation(s) of prospective or current students and family members

yet as educators we want generation x parents to work with us
Yet, as educators, we want Generation X parents to work with us…
  • Start by informing them of your expectations
  • Provide explanation of how their child’s progress will be measured
  • Assure parents that you are committed to helping them learn the skills they will need to effectively partner with you (and with their child)
  • They will respond best to feedback and suggestions!
meet generation next 18 30 years of age
Meet Generation Next (18-30 years of age)
  • They use technology and the internet to connect with people in new and distinctive ways.
  • Text messaging, instant messaging, and email keep them in constant contact with friends.
the look at me generation
The “Look At Me” generation
  • Social networking sites are normative
  • Four-in-ten have created a personal profile online
a quick summary the millennials
A quick summary – The Millennials
  • Gravitate toward group activity
  • Identify with their parents’ values and feel close to their parents
  • Spend more time doing homework and housework and less time watching TV than previous generations
  • Believe it’s “cool to be smart”
  • Are fascinated by new technologies
  • Are racially and ethnically diverse
  • Often (one in five) have at least one immigrant parent
these students exhibit distinct learning styles tending toward
These students exhibit distinct learning styles tending toward
  • Teamwork
  • Experiential activities
  • Structure
  • Use of Technology
their strengths include
Their strengths include
  • Multi-tasking
  • Goal Orientation
  • Positive Attitudes
  • Collaboration
computers aren t technology
Computers aren’t technology
  • Students have never known life without computers and the Internet
  • To them, the computer is not a technology - it is an assumed part of life (Oblinger, 2006).
  • Nintendo logic prevails – this trail and error approach to solving problems is not the rule-based logic valued by earlier generations.
  • “I tried, I failed, but I learned --- by failing.”
0 00 60
0:00.60

Time per Session Students Spend on College Websites

Source: Target X

1 53 12
1:53.12

Time per Session Students Spend on MySpace.com

Source: Target X

doing is more important than knowing
Doing is more important than knowing
  • Knowledge is no longer perceived to be the ultimate goal, especially in light of the half-life of information.
  • Results and actions are considered more important than the accumulation of facts.
zero tolerance for delays
Zero-tolerance for delays
  • They have grown up in a customer-service culture
  • Strong demand for immediacy
  • 24-7 service expected to be available in a variety of modes (web, phone, in person)
      • Virtual Information Stations
slide28

Most important college attributes for parents of college-bound students (Stamats, 2004)

slide29

Most important college attributes for parents of college-bound students (Stamats, 2004)

high school students

High School Students

Source: State of Our Nation’s Youth, 2006

10% of respondents were private school enrollees

slide34
95%

Percentage of high school students with internet access

Source: Horatio Alger Association

slide35
90%

Age 13-21 That Regularly Use Instant Messaging

Source: Target X

15 17
15-17

Girls this Age Are “Power Communicators Online”

students live with
Students live with:

Mother Father Both Parents 1 Parent

90% 69% 61% 36%

one wish
One Wish…
  • More time spent together with family 46%
  • More money to buy things 27%
  • A bigger house 14%
  • More time in spiritual pursuits 7%
define a good meal
Define a “good meal”
  • Home-cooked 71%
  • Sit-down restaurant 20%
  • Fast-food restaurant 4%
  • Take-out food at home 4%
slide41
America’s high school students want more from their high schools and want their high schools to want more from them.

Schools are not doing enough to prevent:

Bullying on school grounds 33%

Weapons on school grounds 24%

Gang activity on school grounds 22%

Trespassers from getting on

school grounds 21%

slide42
If your high school demanded more of students, set higher standards, and raised expectations, would you work harder?

Yes, would work harder No, would not work harder

88% 11%

slide43
62%

Percentage of high school students who say they are dealing with at least one major problem in their lives

Source: Horatio Alger Association

facing challenges and fitting in
Facing Challenges and Fitting In

Major Problem Minor Problem

Pressure to get good grades 41% 39%

Pressure to look a certain way 17% 34%

Family Pressures 17% 40%

Financial Pressures 18% 36%

Loneliness/Feeling Left Out 11% 31%

what does this suggest
What does this suggest?
  • Parents, at all levels, will continue to actively partner/shelter/encourage their children.
  • They regard school teachers, faculty, and administrations as professionals with whom they should engage.
  • Helicopters have radar
for students
For students
  • Engagement, Collaboration, and Interaction are more critical than ever at all levels of education.
  • Research suggests that today’s learners may be neurologically pre-disposed to respond best to multi-modal stimulation (engaging vision, audition, motor, and tactical stimulation) delivered at higher rates.
for students47
For students
  • As parents “outsource” to specialists, they and their students will expect the same professional assessment and assistance from school professionals (for themselves and for their students).
  • Expect rates of reinforcement 10 times higher than most schools deliver
for educators
For educators
  • Structure remains important at all levels of education.
  • Multi-modal delivery systems integrating technology with other forms of experiential learning will be preferred.
  • Your school’s experience must be more than an academic experience.
  • “Special children” want to attend special institutions, where those children can play special roles.
  • Stressing your institution’s traditions, high standards, and involvement in national life is important in appealing both to students and to their parents.
thank you
Thank You!
  • Questions?
  • Additional information regarding Working with Generation X parents will be shared at this morning’s workshop.