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Family Foster Care (FFC) and Therapeutic Foster Care (TFC) Parents' Motivation, Stress and Satisfaction with Fostering: PowerPoint Presentation
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Family Foster Care (FFC) and Therapeutic Foster Care (TFC) Parents' Motivation, Stress and Satisfaction with Fostering: Part 2. Michael Brand, Ph.D. David Bard, Ph.D. Keri Pierce, MSW., MPH. The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Background.

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Family Foster Care (FFC) and Therapeutic Foster Care (TFC) Parents' Motivation, Stress and Satisfaction with Fostering:


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Family Foster Care (FFC) and Therapeutic Foster Care (TFC) Parents' Motivation, Stress and Satisfaction with Fostering: Part 2

Michael Brand, Ph.D.

David Bard, Ph.D.

Keri Pierce, MSW., MPH.

The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

background
Background

While the connection between foster parents motivation, stress and satisfaction exists in the literature, little attention has been given to differences in foster fathers and mothers motivation and how these similarities and differences may impact recruitment and retention of foster parents. The current study assesses foster fathers and mothers motivation and analyzes differences that exist between fathers and mothers motivation. The study also assess the influence motivation has on stress related to foster parenting and its relationship to satisfaction.

participants
Participants

In 2000 all 1,100 FFC homes and 341 randomly selected TFC homes were sent the Oklahoma Foster Family Survey (OFFS). Of these, 320 foster homes and 129 therapeutic foster homes responded to the survey. A total of 447 foster mothers and 237 foster fathers completed the survey. The average age of foster mothers is 46 and 48 years for fathers. Over 75% of the foster parents who responded are white and over 70% are married. Of the foster parents, over 30% have a high school education and less than 10% have a college degree. Over 60% of foster fathers are employed full time, while 26% of foster mothers are employed full time and 29% are homemakers. The average income of respondents is less than $40,000.00 per year.

measures
Measures

Because the majority foster families are two parent families, the degree to which the foster parents cooperates with and value each other’s parenting skills and roles is critical to effective family functioning. The Parental Alliance Inventory (PAI) was used to measure the degree to which each parent is invested in the child’s welfare, the degree each parent values the other parent’s role and judgment, and the parent’s ability to communicate with one another (Cohen, 1985). Parental alliance is believed to be related to motivation for foster parenting and stress.

measures5
Measures

The issues of motivation and expectations of foster parents may significantly impact their experience as foster parents, the outcome of the placement and the longevity of a foster parent. The Motivation for Foster Parenting Inventory (MFPI) was developed for the OFFS. Items for the inventory were derived from experiences of the researchers with foster parents, variables identified in foster care literature and the Why I Became A Foster Parent (1992) survey developed by the Casey Family Program, Seattle, Washington.

measures6
Measures

In order to assess the stress foster parents experience, how it is manifested, and the responses foster parents generally employ to alleviate stress the Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI) was included. The Occupational Stress Inventory was developed by Ospiow & Spokane in 1987. OSI is a concise measure of three stress related domains; occupational stress, psychological strain, and coping resources. For each of these domains, detailed information is provided by scales measuring specific attributes of the environment or individual that represents important facets of the domains. Two sections of the OSI were adapted for use in the OFFS; Personal Strain Questionnaire (PSQ) and the Personal Resources Questionnaire (PRQ).

Personal Strain Questions (PSQ): The PSQ measures the domain of psychological strain and is comprised ofthreesubscales; Psychological Strain (PSY), Interpersonal Strain (IS), Physical Strain (PHS). Personal Resources Questions (PRQ): The PRQ is composed of four subscales include Recreation (RE), Self-care (SC), Social Support (SS), and Rational/Cognitive Coping (RC).

measures7
Measures

Foster parent satisfaction with a foster care agency is an important variable which can directly affect the quality of both the foster children and foster parents’ experience. The Agency Satisfaction Inventory (ASI) was developed for this study to assess agency variables that may affect foster parent functioning and effectiveness. Items developed for ASI were underpinned by foster care literature, researchers’ experiences with foster care, and other agency instruments which assess satisfaction of clients with agency services.

background8
Background

While the connection between foster parents motivation, stress and satisfaction exists in the literature, little attention has been given to differences in foster fathers and mothers motivation and how these similarities and differences may impact recruitment and retention of foster parents. The current study assesses foster fathers and mothers motivation and analyzes differences that exist between fathers and mothers motivation. The study also assess the influence motivation has on stress related to foster parenting and its relationship to satisfaction.

participants9
Participants

In 2000 all 1,100 FFC homes and 341 randomly selected TFC homes were sent the Oklahoma Foster Family Survey (OFFS). Of these, 320 foster homes and 129 therapeutic foster homes responded to the survey. A total of 447 foster mothers and 237 foster fathers completed the survey. The average age of foster mothers is 46 and 48 years for fathers. Over 75% of the foster parents who responded are white and over 70% are married. Of the foster parents, over 30% have a high school education and less than 10% have a college degree. Over 60% of foster fathers are employed full time, while 26% of foster mothers are employed full time and 29% are homemakers. The average income of respondents is less than $40,000.00 per year.

measures10
Measures

Because the majority foster families are two parent families, the degree to which the foster parents cooperates with and value each other’s parenting skills and roles is critical to effective family functioning. The Parental Alliance Inventory (PAI) was used to measure the degree to which each parent is invested in the child’s welfare, the degree each parent values the other parent’s role and judgment, and the parent’s ability to communicate with one another (Cohen, 1985). Parental alliance is believed to be related to motivation for foster parenting and stress.

measures11
Measures

The issues of motivation and expectations of foster parents may significantly impact their experience as foster parents, the outcome of the placement and the longevity of a foster parent. The Motivation for Foster Parenting Inventory (MFPI) was developed for the OFFS. Items for the inventory were derived from experiences of the researchers with foster parents, variables identified in foster care literature and the Why I Became A Foster Parent (1992) survey developed by the Casey Family Program, Seattle, Washington.

measures12
Measures

In order to assess the stress foster parents experience, how it is manifested, and the responses foster parents generally employ to alleviate stress the Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI) was included. The Occupational Stress Inventory was developed by Ospiow & Spokane in 1987. OSI is a concise measure of three stress related domains; occupational stress, psychological strain, and coping resources. For each of these domains, detailed information is provided by scales measuring specific attributes of the environment or individual that represents important facets of the domains. Two sections of the OSI were adapted for use in the OFFS; Personal Strain Questionnaire (PSQ) and the Personal Resources Questionnaire (PRQ).

Personal Strain Questions (PSQ): The PSQ measures the domain of psychological strain and is comprised ofthreesubscales; Psychological Strain (PSY), Interpersonal Strain (IS), Physical Strain (PHS). Personal Resources Questions (PRQ): The PRQ is composed of four subscales include Recreation (RE), Self-care (SC), Social Support (SS), and Rational/Cognitive Coping (RC).

measures13
Measures

Foster parent satisfaction with a foster care agency is an important variable which can directly affect the quality of both the foster children and foster parents’ experience. The Agency Satisfaction Inventory (ASI) was developed for this study to assess agency variables that may affect foster parent functioning and effectiveness. Items developed for ASI were underpinned by foster care literature, researchers’ experiences with foster care, and other agency instruments which assess satisfaction of clients with agency services.