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Why do we like some books more than others? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Why do we like some books more than others?. Why do some characters appeal to us and others don’t?. Why can we get a clear picture of some characters in our heads?. Why does reading the description of some settings make us feel like we are there?. Because of the good use of the

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Presentation Transcript
slide2

Why do some characters

appeal to us and others don’t?

Why can we get a clear picture

of some characters in our heads?

slide3

Why does reading the description

of some settings make us feel

like we are there?

slide4

Because of the good use of the

Elements Of Literature!

A.K.A

C C S P P T

slide5

CHARACTER

The people or personified animals or objects in a story.

character can be revealed in four ways

  • 1. appearance: what they look like
  • 2. speech: what they say/think/feel
  • 3. actions: what they do
  • 4. opinions: what others say/think/feel about them
  • -Round character:
    • Fully developed, with many traits—bad and good—shown in the story. Readers feel that they know the character so well that he or she has become a real person.
  • -Flat character:
  • Not fully developed; readers know only one side of the character.
  • Round-----------------------------------------------Flat

stages of character development

slide6

The amount of change in a character over the course of the story also affects its quality.

    • -Dynamic character:
    • a character who does experience a basic character change during the course of the story. This change is internal and may be sudden, but the events of the plot should make it seem inevitable.
    • -Static character:
  • a character who does not experience a basic character change during the course of the story.
  • Dynamic-----------------------------------------Static
    • Sympathetic/Unsympathetic: if a character is likeable, he or she may be referred to as a sympathetic character. An dislikeable character is unsympathetic.

change

reader involvement

slide8

1. Main

  • a. Protagonist:
      • The central/main character in the plot’s conflict. The “hero” or the person undergoing change.
        • Ex.:
    • b. Antagonist:
      • The force in conflict with the protagonist. It may be society, nature, or fate, as well as another character. It can even be the protagonist him/herself!
      • Ex.:
  • Characters who help or hinder the main character
  • and help move the plot along.
  • Ex.:
  • background characters who do not affect the plot
  • (extras in a movie)
  • Ex.:

End of CHARACATER!!!

2. Major

3. Minor

slide9

CONFLICT

The struggle between the protagonist and an opposing force.

End of CONFLICT!!!

internal conflict

  • Person Vs. Self:
    • Occurs when the protagonist struggles within himself or herself. The protagonist is pulled by two courses of action or by differing emotions.
  • Person Vs. Person:
    • Occurs when the protagonist struggles against another character in the story.
  • Person Vs. Society:
    • Occurs when the protagonist is in conflict with the values of the society.
  • Person Vs. Nature:
    • Occurs when the protagonist is in conflict with an element of nature.

external conflict

[ab1]Stripes

slide10

SETTING

Includes the time period and place in which the story takes place. Setting may or may not have an important influence on the story.

End of SETTING!!!

This type of setting is essential to the plot; it influences action, character and theme. The story couldn’t take place anywhere else.

integral

setting

backdrop

setting

This type of setting is relatively unimportant to the plot; it is like the flat painted scenery of a theatre.

slide11

PLOT

What happens in the story.

exposition

how the story starts;

background information;

meet protagonist

rising action

During the story, tension is built through a series of complications, incidents which either help or hinder (hurt) the protagonist in finding the solution to the problem.

climax

The highest peak or turning point of the action; at this point we know the outcome. The two forces in conflict come together and the protagonist either wins or loses.

falling action

The events that occur after the climax. They give any necessary information or explanations and “tie up loose ends.”

slide12

resolution

how the story ends; the sense at the end of the story that the story is complete

End of PLOT!!!

closed:

The most usual one in children’s books; readers feel that they know what will happen. The various parts of plot are tied together satisfactorily, and the reader feels a sense of completion.

open:

Readers must draw their own conclusions; they do not know what will happen.

cliffhanger:

Abrupt ending at an exciting and often dangerous time in the plot; its purpose is to keep the reader reading; usually found at the end of a chapter, but some books end this way.

slide13

POINT OF VIEW

The vantage point from which the story is told. Who is the narrator and how is he involved in the story?

The narrator is a character in the story, usually the protagonist. She tells the story from her own experience.

Key pronouns: I, me, my

first-person

[ab1]Purple Hair?, knots on a counting rope

[ab1]Stephanie’s Ponytail

second-person

The narrator may or may not be a character in the story; he speaks directly to the audience. This P.O.V is rarely used in modern literature.

Key pronouns: you, we, us

[ab1]Alexander, owl moom

third-person

The narrator is not a character in the story. Key pronouns: he, she, they, it, him, her, etc.

slide14

third-person dramatic/objective:

The narrator does not reveal any thoughts or feelings of the characters. Readers are told only what happens and what is said. It is called “dramatic” because it is what you usually see and hear in a movie or play. It is called “objective” account is based on facts.

End of POINT OF VIEW!!!

third-person limited:

Narrator reveals the thoughts and feelings of only one character (sometimes, but very rarely of two or three.

third-person omniscient:

Narrator reveals the thoughts and feelings of most or all the characters. “Omniscient” means having unlimited knowledge.

slide15

THEME

The underlying meaning of the story,

a universal truth,

a lesson,

a moral,

a significant statement the story is making about society, human nature, or the human condition.

End of THEME!!!

explicit

theme

The theme is openly stated in the book in universal terms.

The theme is NOT stated directly; the reader must infer it; figure it out.

implicit

theme

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