strategies to address hiv among homeless youth in the united states n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Strategies to Address HIV Among Homeless Youth in the United States PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Strategies to Address HIV Among Homeless Youth in the United States

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 15

Strategies to Address HIV Among Homeless Youth in the United States - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 123 Views
  • Uploaded on

Strategies to Address HIV Among Homeless Youth in the United States. International AIDS Conference July 22, 2012 Lara Tannenbaum, MSW Director of Health Services Larkin Street Youth Services. HIV Among Youth in the United States.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Strategies to Address HIV Among Homeless Youth in the United States' - walt


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
strategies to address hiv among homeless youth in the united states

Strategies to Address HIV Among Homeless Youth in the United States

International AIDS Conference

July 22, 2012

Lara Tannenbaum, MSW Director of Health Services

Larkin Street Youth Services

hiv among youth in the united states
HIV Among Youth in the United States

Youth in the U.S. are disproportionally affected by HIV in several ways:

Age

Gender

Race

Sexual Activity

Location

youth population hiv infection
Youth Population : HIV Infection

Sources: CDC fact sheet: HIV Among Youth, 2011

slide4

Of the 34,733:

Of the 69% male:

69%

estimated 34,733 adolescents and young adults 13 to 24 years of age were living with a diagnosis of HIV infection in 2009

60%

Sources: CDC fact sheet: HIV and AIDS among African American Youth ,2010

race trends in hiv incidence african americans

In 2009, young African Americans accounted for 65% (5,404) of diagnoses of HIV infection reported among persons aged 13–24 years

65%

In 2010, 15% of adolescents were African American, yet an estimated 69% of diagnoses of HIV infection in 13 to 19 year olds were in black/African American adolescents.

RACE Trends in HIV Incidence : African Americans

69%

Sources: CDC fact sheet: HIV and AIDS among African American Youth ,2010

transmission attributed to male to male sexual contact in 2010

Among Adolescent and Young Adult Males

Transmission attributed to male-to-male sexual contact IN 2010

Sources: CDC – HIV Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults, 2012

homeless unstably housed youth and hiv
Homeless/Unstably Housed Youth and HIV

Estimates of between 1.7-2 million youth experience homelessness each year in the United States

  • Young people in the United States become homeless for many reasons including: high levels of family conflict, parental substance abuse, physical or sexual abuse occurring in the home, neglect from parent or guardian, economic stress in the family, aging out of foster care or the juvenile justice system.
  • Estimates of LGBT homeless youth range from 11% to 35%.

Homeless youths are at increased risk of contracting HIV due to:

  • Histories of childhood sexual abuse, sexual activity at an early age, depression, alcohol and drug abuse and lack of connectedness to trusted adults and family.
  • While on the streets risk factors include: High degree of participation in survival sex, sex with risky partners, IV drug use, needle sharing, having sex while intoxicated or high, minimal condom use, risk of sexual victimization.
  • Estimates of HIV prevalence among homeless youth range from 5.3 to 12.9 % or 2 to 12 times greater than housed adolescents.

Sources:National Network for Youth; National Coalition for the Homeless; Coco Auerswald, MD, MS, Assoc. Professor, Division of Adolescent Medicine UCSF – research on homeless youth in SF; Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness, 2010

hiv among homeless youth in san francisco
HIV Among Homeless Youth in San Francisco

Larkin Street served 80 HIV homeless/marginally housed youth in FY ‘11

Age: Majority (86%) are between the ages of 21-25

Gender: majority are male (84%) or transgender MTF (10%)

Sexual Orientation: 81% identify as Gay, Bisexual, or Questioning

Race: almost evenly split between African American (21%), Caucasian (21%) and Latino (25%)

Health Status: 21% of youth had an AIDS diagnosis

  • Mental health issues at intake:
  • 82% have been in counseling
  • 52% have seen a psychiatrist
  • 61% have been prescribed psychiatric medications
  • 30% have been hospitalized for psychiatric reasons
  • 67% of youth report having felt seriously depressed in the previous 30 days
  • Level of substance use is high:
  • 86% have used any drugs
  • 46% have used cocaine
  • 23% have used crack
  • 46% have used speed
  • 17% have used heroin
  • 43% have injected drugs
what are the outcomes we want to see for homeless hiv positive youth
What are the Outcomes we want to see for Homeless HIV Positive Youth?

Improved Health

  • Clinical Benchmarks (CD4,viral load, immunizations, dental care)
  • Connection to medical care
  • Medication adherence

Increased Stability

  • Obtain and maintain housing
  • Decrease substance use
  • Address mental health issues

Strong Lifeskills development

  • Employment
  • Education
  • Confidence to navigate systems to get basic needs met
  • Ability to form healthy and trusting relationships with peers
challenges in meeting outcomes
Challenges in Meeting Outcomes

Client Level Challenges

Systems Level Challenges

Having unaccompanied homeless youth recognized as a specific homeless population

Ex: HEARTH Act, Opening Doors

Need for increased coordination across federal agencies addressing homelessness, youth and HIV

Ex: recent elimination of federal HIV funding specifically for youth

Trend towards dismantling HIV specific funding and services

HIV increasingly seen as chronic manageable disease, integrated within public health system

Shifting of HIV funds to underserved areas of the country with growing epidemic

Risk of dismantling effective systems of care elsewhere

Health Care Reform

lots of unknowns about impact on people with HIV

  • Fear of disclosing HIV status/ Dealing with stigma
  • Inability to decrease substance use
  • Failure to practice safer sex activities
  • Unaddressed mental health issues
  • Challenge of navigating multiple service delivery systems
  • Uncomfortable with services designed for adults
  • Developmental focus on present – not future thinking
strategies to support hiv positive homeless youth
Strategies to Support HIV Positive Homeless Youth

Goal: To improve health of HIV positive youth by providing care and keeping youth connected to care (housing, support services, medical care)

Advocacy and Education to address systems barriers on multiple levels

Housing as Healthcare

Harm Reduction philosophy

Youth Culturally Competent Services

Co-location of Services (one stop shopping)

what these strategies look like at larkin street youth services
What these strategies look like at Larkin Street Youth Services

HIV Testing

  • Health Care
  • Youth focused HIV Primary Care
  • Nursing Care
  • Health Education
  • Medication Adherence Counseling

Housing as Healthcare

  • Productive Activity
  • Employment
  • Volunteering
  • School
  • Appointments
  • Immediate access to Housing
  • Residential
  • Scattered Site

Harm Reduction Philosophy

  • Social Services
  • Case Management
  • Peer Advocates
  • Life skills development
  • Nutritious Meals
  • Transportation Assistance
  • Employment and Education Svc.

Youth Culturally Competent Services

Research Study Participation

  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Support
  • Therapist
  • Psychiatrist
  • Groups
  • medication

Co-location of services

  • Prevention with Positives
  • Individual counseling
  • Medication adherence
questions
Questions???

Lara Tannenbaum, MSW

Director of Health Services

Larkin Street Youth Services

ltannenbaum@larkinstreetyouth.org

415-749-6968