Scenario 1: You Are the Emergency Medical Responder - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Scenario 1: You Are the Emergency Medical Responder

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  1. Lesson 36: Putting It All Together Scenario 1: You Are the Emergency Medical Responder You arrive on the scene where a bicyclist has been struck by a motor vehicle. The collision happened on a busy two-lane highway. Bystanders report that the bicyclist was thrown from the bike, hitting her head as she fell to the ground. The bicycle flew up in the air and landed on her chest and abdomen. The driver of the car has stopped to help. As you approach, you notice that the bicyclist is bleeding from a deep laceration on her upper arm and she is moaning in pain. Her left leg is twisted and deformed. She has numerous abrasions on her legs.

  2. Scenario 2: You Are the Emergency Medical Responder You are called to the scene of a fire in an office building. Fire personnel already are on the scene. Suddenly a woman runs out of the building. The arm of her blouse and jacket are on fire. She falls to the ground screaming.

  3. Scenario 3: You Are the Emergency Medical Responder You and a partner are the first to arrive on the scene where a motor vehicle has crashed into a telephone pole. A driver and passenger were in the car. Both passengers are out of the car and sitting on the curb. After sizing up the scene, you and your partner approach the patients. You partner is providing care to the passenger who has some abrasions and lacerations that are oozing. You are providing care to the driver who was not wearing a seat belt. He is alert but complaining of abdominal pain and feeling a little “sick to his stomach.” You do not notice any signs of external bleeding.

  4. Putting It All Together • Shock (hypoperfusion) occurs when the cells’ ability to receive oxygenated blood is compromised. • Types: • Hypovolemic • Obstructive • Distributive • Cardiogenic

  5. Putting It All Together (cont’d) • External bleeding control: • Direct pressure • Tourniquet • Hemostatic agents • Elevation • Immobilization • Pressure points • Soft tissue injuries: • Closed • Open • Burns

  6. Putting It All Together (cont’d) • Impaled objects: Never removed unless it interferes with chest compressions • Musculoskeletal injuries: • Rest • Immobilize • Cold • Elevate • Manual stabilization for any suspected head, neck or spinal injury