Are these laws real? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Are these laws real?

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  1. A whale washed up or caught around the British Isles is the property of the monarch. Eating mince pies on Christmas Day is banned. It is illegal to enter the Houses of Parliament wearing a suit of armour. London taxis must carry a bale of hay and a sack of oats. Are these laws real?

  2. A whale washed up or caught around the British Isles is the property of the monarch. True! Under section 13 of the Prerogativa Regis of 1322,a whale washed up or caught around the British Isles is the property of the King (or Queen). However, I don’t think the queen is trsict about the rule being stuck to! Are these laws real?

  3. Eating mince pies on Christmas Day is banned. • Not true........but....... • On 22 December 1657 Oliver Cromwell’s Puritan Council did ban the consumption of Mince Pies and Christmas Puddings; in fact, they abolished the celebration of Christmas altogether! • However, when King Charles II returned to the throne of England in 1659 all of the laws passed by Cromwell were declared as invalid on the basis that they did not have Royal Assent, so those who want to enjoy a Christmas treat need not fear a night in the police cells. Are these laws real?

  4. It is illegal to enter the Houses of Parliament wearing a suit of armour. True! Under the Statute Forbidding the Bearing of Armour of 1313: “The King forbids the coming armed to Parliament”. Are these laws real?

  5. London taxis must carry a bale of hay and a sack of oats. Remember – there was a time when all vehicles were horse drawn.... But London taxis do not have to carry a bale of hay or a sack of oats.... Under section 51 of the London Hackney Carriage Act 1831 it was an offence, punishable by a fine of 20 Shillings, for a driver to feed his horses anything other than oats out of a bag, or hay from his hands. However, there was no law requiring the driver to carry the oats or the hay.  Are these laws real?