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“First Confession”. Story Map Review. Setting Characters Conflicts Outcome Themes. Metaphor. Definition - comparison of two unlike things that actually have something in common, without using “like” or “ as” Examples : “He was a lion in the fight” “Love is a rose.”

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story map review
Story Map Review
  • Setting
  • Characters
  • Conflicts
  • Outcome
  • Themes
metaphor
Metaphor
  • Definition- comparison of two unlike things that actually have something in common, without using “like” or “as”
  • Examples:
    • “He was a lion in the fight”
    • “Love is a rose.”
    • "The streets were a furnace, the sun an executioner.“
    • "Humor is the shock absorber of life; it helps us take the blows.“
    • You come up with one!
simile
Simile
  • Definition—comparison of two things, using “like” or “as”
    • “It’s been a hard day, and I’ve been working like a dog.”
    • “His skin was as cold as ice.”
    • “He eats like a pig.”
    • You come up with one!
  • Significance—similes add emphasis to words and can make descriptions more vivid
dictio n
Diction
  • Diction: Element of style an author’s word choice; affects tone; determined based on purpose and audience
    • Example:

"Dearest reader, I humbly entreat you to eschew the latest celebrity tittle-tattle and instead devote your attention to diction and tone." Sophisticated/elevated word choice—very formal

versus

"Listen up! Drop the gossip magazine and get with the diction/tone program!" Informal/colloquial word choice—used with peers/friends/people of equal or lower “status”

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Tone
  • Definition: implied attitude of the author/speaker toward the subject/audience; determined by diction
  • What are some adjectives you can think of to describe tone?
  • How does tone influence the meaning of a text?
connotation and denotation
Connotation and Denotation
  • Denotation: the literal, “dictionary definition” meaning of a word
  • Connotation: the commonly understood, subjective cultural association of meaning with a word, in addition to the dictionary definition
    • For example, we use many different terms for young people. While “little one” and “brat” both literally refer to a young person, “little one” usually has a positive connotation (association), whereas “brat” typically has a negative connotation. You wouldn’t want to compliment a young mother by calling her child a “cute little brat.”
    • Other examples:
      • “Stink” versus “aroma” versus “smell”
      • “Reckless” plan versus “daring” plan
      • “Easygoing” friend versus “lazy” friend
      • Answer with “arrogance” versus answer with “confidence”
positive negative and neutral connotations
Positive, Negative, and Neutral Connotations

POSITIVE= “LITTLE ONE”

NEUTRAL=CHILD NEGATIVE=BRAT

positive negative and neutral connotations1
Positive, Negative, and Neutral Connotations

POSITIVE= “STROLLING” NEUTRAL=“WALKING”

NEGATIVE=“TRUDGING”

first confession1
“First Confession”

Analytical Questions

point of view
Point of View
  • Describe the narrator of the story. Support your description with specific details.
  • Imagine if the story were told through a different point of view—maybe the priest, the sister, or an objective narrator. What would be lost?
  • What kind of relationship does Jackie have with his family?
  • How does Jackie’s point of view as a child (when telling the story) seem to differ from the author’s perspective as an adult? Discuss the following plot details.
      • Jackie’s attitude about his grandmother/ her terrible vices
      • Mrs. Ryan’s tale of the burned handprints
      • Jackie’s explanation for the long silence after confessing his plan to kill his grandmother
      • Jackie’s plan for disposing of the body
character characterization
Character/ Characterization
  • In what ways is Jackie not entirely naïve, but sometimes shrewd and perceptive?
  • What character traits does the priest display? How does he differ from Mrs. Ryan?
theme
Theme
  • Do you believe a possible message of the story is that, as Nora claims at the end, there is no point in trying to live a virtuous life? Why or why not?
suspense
Suspense
  • How does O’Connor create suspense in the story?
allusion simile
Allusion/Simile
  • As Nora and Jackie walk to the chapel, Jackie describes the “sunlit hillsides beyond the valley of the river, which I saw in the gaps between the houses like Adam’s last glimpse of Paradise.” What is the allusion, and why is it appropriate?
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Tone
  • What parts did you find to be particularly humorous?