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ALEXANDER. THE. GREAT. Theme 1: Relationship with Greeks. The League of Corinth. Homework Tonight Use your existing notes on the League of Corinth OR Artus page 23 to complete the notes on pages 2 and 3 of the booklet. King Alexander.

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slide1
ALEXANDER

THE

GREAT

Theme 1: Relationship with Greeks

slide2
The League of Corinth

Homework Tonight

Use your existing notes on the League of Corinth OR Artus page 23 to complete the notes on pages 2 and 3 of the booklet.

slide3
King Alexander
  • After Alexander was proclaimed King, he had a number of immediate problems to solve, first inside Macedonia, then in the rest of Greece:
  • He killed all rivals to the throne, including 2 of the 3 Lyncestian brothers (see Artus, pg.16) and Amyntas (son of Philip’s elder brother). Attalus was also killed.
  • All Greece was in revolt. He first went south, where he outwitted the Thessalians to gain their support. Athens and the other southern states acclaimed him as Philip’s successor and new Hegemon of the League of Corinth.
  • He then needed to go north, to deal with revolts in Illyria.
  • While in the north, there were rumours that he had been killed. Thebes again revolted, with support from Athens.
  • Alexander laid siege to Thebes and defeated it. (see next slide)
slide4
The Sack of Thebes

Read about this on page 5 of your workbook.

Hamilton (your textbook writer) calls this “a calculated act of terrorism”.

Discuss the following with your neighbours.

Was this an ‘act of terrorism’?

Is this a fair assessment of Alexander’s actions?

slide5
Rebellions of King Agis

333 – 331BC

Agis was the King of Sparta

He allied with the Persians because Alexander was a common enemy

  • 1st Rebellion
  • Corrhagus was the Macedonian general
  • The rebels were Spartans, backed by Persian gold and ships
  • They were Anti-Alexander/Macedonia, Sparta had proud traditions of independence and leadership in Greece, Alex was absent = opportunity.
  • Outcome: Corrhagus was defeated at Corinth.
slide6
Rebellions of King Agis

333 – 331BC

Agis was the King of Sparta

He allied with the Persians because Alexander was a common enemy

  • 2nd Rebellion
  • Major Battle at Megalopolis
  • Macedonians led by Antipater
  • Outcome: The Spartans were heavily outnumbered (Antipater had 40,000 troops) and crushed. Agis was killed
  • After the Battle: Message to Alex – what to do with Sparta. Alex decides to force them to join League of Corinth. Spartan allies already part of League were made to pay compensation to Megalopolis.
slide7
The Conquest of Asia Minor

Troy

Granicus River (334BC)

Gordium

Miletus

Halicarnassus

Issus

(333BC)

Tarsus

map: www.wargamer.com

slide8
Greek Mercenaries
  • Hired soldiers who fought for the Persians
  • Led by Memnon (a Greek general)

Releasing the Greek Mercenaries:

See Hamilton pages 63 and 78

  • Mercenaries were enslaved and sent to work in Macedonia
  • Alexander was harsh to set an example to other Gks fighting for Persia
slide9
Disbanding The Fleet

The Conquest of Asia Minor

Troy

Granicus River (334BC)

Gordium

Miletus

Halicarnassus

Issus

(333BC)

Tarsus

map: www.wargamer.com

Use Artus pages 44 & 46 and Hamilton page 60 to fill out the notes on this event.

slide10
Miletus and Halicarnassus

Thanks to his navy’s blockage of the port, the city of Miletus was captured easily by Alexander and his troops. He then made a decision to disband his fleet. As a result, the siege of Halicarnassus was long and drawn out, due to the Persians being able to supply the city from the sea unopposed. After Halicarnassus, Alexander ordered the fleet rebuilt. Had he made a mistake to disband it earlier?

  • Read Arrian’s passage on the disbanding of the fleet (Artus pg.46) What reasons does he give for Alexander’s decision?
  • Now read Hamilton pages 59-60. What is his view of the more likely reasons for the decision?
slide11
The Exiles Decree 324BC

“King Alexander to the exiles from the Greek cities. We were not the cause of your exile, but we shall be responsible for bringing about your return to your native cities, except for those of you who are under a curse. We have written to Antipater about this matter so that he may apply compulsion to those cities which refuse to reinstate their exiles.”

– The Exiles Decree, read out at the Olympic Games, 324BC

Use Hamilton Pages 136-138 and/or Artus page 32 to complete the notes (page 10 of your workbook) on this key event.

slide12
Alexander and Athens

Why show favour to Athens?

What evidence is there of favour?

slide13
Alexander and Sparta

Not on good terms? (Evidence)

CHRONOLOGY CHALLENGE – CLICK HERE (SMARTBOARD)

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