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Simple Short Reports #4 Mummy’s curse Dr. Craig Jackson Senior Lecturer in Health Psychology School of Health and Poli PowerPoint Presentation
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Simple Short Reports #4 Mummy’s curse Dr. Craig Jackson Senior Lecturer in Health Psychology School of Health and Policy Studies Faculty of Health & Community Care University of Central England. craig.jackson@uce.ac.uk. The Mummy’s Curse

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Simple Short Reports #4

Mummy’s curse

Dr. Craig Jackson

Senior Lecturer in Health Psychology

School of Health and Policy Studies

Faculty of Health & Community Care

University of Central England

craig.jackson@uce.ac.uk

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The Mummy’s Curse

Examine survival of those exposed to the “mummy’s curse”

Tomb of Tutankhamen in Luxor, between 1923and 1926

Retrospective Cohort Study

44 Westerners present in Egypt at the specified dates

25 potentiallyexposed to thecurse

Outcome measure

Length of survival after exposure

Nelson MR, 2002

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The Mummy’s Curse

Used Westerners recorded in Carter's writings as being in Egypt at the time but not recorded byhim as present at the site at the mentioned times

Included only Western individuals in the analysis

D.O.B and death identified by biographical texts, newspaper obituaries (the Times, New York Times, Le Monde)and a Google web based search (searched with keywordsarchaeology, Egyptology, personal name, Egypt, Tutankhamun, andTutankhamen)

Records divided into those who survived less than or greaterthan 10 years

Comparisons were then made by age, sex, and exposure

Survival was analysed by “any” or “no” exposure and by number of exposuresby logisticregression.

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The Mummy’s Curse

Results:

Group comparison of characteristics of people with data on mortality according to exposure to the mummy's curse.

Exposed Unexposed P

n=25 n=11

No (%) of men 24 (96%) 7 (64%) <0.001

Age at classification (years) 49.3 (11.0) 44.1 (9.1) 0.25

Age at death (years) 70.0 (12.4) 75.0 (13.0) 0.87

Survival (years) 20.8 (15.2) 28.9 (13.6) 0.95

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The Mummy’s Curse

Results:

Female sex a significant predictor of survival (38 v 21 years, P=0.017).

Adjustment for age, sex,

exposure, and number of

times exposed did not confer

additional risk forearly death

within 10 years. Odds ratio 1.38.

Also no effect on

survival timefor any exposure

or number ofexposures.

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The Mummy’s Curse

Limitations:

Exposedpeople were more likely to be involved with the dig and thereforebe mentioned in print, therefore easier to trace

Sex difference: spouses of professionals in the1920s more likely to be women and therefore over-representedin the unexposed group.

“Exposure” may also bequestioned with the possibility of contamination of the unexposedif the “curse” acted longer or more widely.

The smallnumbers analysed, however, resulted in wide confidence intervals,and the study may have been underpowered to show a more subtleadverseeffect.

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The Mummy’s Curse

Conclusions:

An Egyptian archaeological dig in the 1920swas inhabited by interesting characters and it was this and thecircumstances of the archaeological find of the modern age thathas kept the myth of the mummy's curse in the public eye.

No evidence for its existence.

Perhaps finally it, like the tragicboy king Tutankhamen, may be put torest.

M.R. Nelson,2002