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  1. Literary1 • Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text explicitly says, as well as inferences drawn from the text. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to characters, setting, and plot. Provide an objective summary of the text. • Slide Forty-One to Forty-Nine • Slide Fifty-Eight to Slide Eighty-Eight

  2. Literary2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. • Slides Forty to Forty-Nine • Slides Fifty-Eight to Eighty-Eight • Slide 360

  3. Literary3 • Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. Tell how something provokes a decision. Slide Forty to Forty-Six, and Slide Fifty-Eight to Eighty, and Slides 328-332 Slide Fifty

  4. Literary4 • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. Need to add figurative and connotative meanings, impact of specific word choices (we call that “diction”). Slide 274-292, Slide 322-332

  5. Literary5 • Compare and contrast the structure of two texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style. Slide 333-336

  6. Literary6 • Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., those created by the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor. Dramatic irony results when the audience or reader is made aware of some factual information before the members of the cast in the play or movie become aware of it, thus the reader or audience is a step ahead of the characters, at least some of them. • Slides Nineteen to Twenty-Two

  7. Literary7 Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to, or departs from, the script or text and then evaluate the choices made by the director or actors. Slide 360, Slides Fifty-Six and Fifty-seven Slide Fifty

  8. Literary9 • Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns of events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such as the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new. Themes, myths, character types, and how borrowed elements from these works appear as they are redone in a modern work of fiction. • Slides Fifty to Fifty-Seven • Slide Eighty-Seven to Eighty-Eight • Slide 421

  9. Literary10 • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently. • Slide 362 • Slide 451-454 for literary titles with Lexile designations • Slide Fifty

  10. Informational1 • Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text explicitly says, as well as inferences drawn from the text. • Slide Fifty-Eight to Slide Sixty-Two

  11. Informational2 • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas: provide an objective summary of the text. • Slide Sixty-One and Slide Sixty-Two • Slide Eighty-Seven to Slide Eighty-Eight • Slide 441-450

  12. Informational3 Analyze how a text makes connections among, and distinctions between, individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). Slide Fifty-Eight to Slide Sixty-One, Conclusions and Inferences Slide 433-439, Comparisons: Similarities and Differences

  13. Informational4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. Slide 322 -333

  14. Informational5 Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. Slide 324-333

  15. Informational6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. Slide thirteen, Slide fifteen Slide 101 to Slide 107 Slide 337, Slide 339-344 Slide 353-356 Slide 358 Slide 370 Slide 394

  16. Informational7 Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different media (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea. Slides 363-366

  17. Informational8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced. Slide 358

  18. Informational9 Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. Slide thirteen to fifteen Slide 101-Slide 107 Slide 339-344 Slide 353-356 Slide 358 Slide 370 Slide 394

  19. Informational10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary non-fiction written at the high end of grades 6-8’s challenging texts. Slide 451-454 for literary titles with Lexile designations.

  20. Research1 Conduct short research projects to answer a question, including a self-generated question, by drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration. Slide ninety-eight Slide 101 Slide 455

  21. Research2 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. Slide 101-107, Slide 369

  22. Research3 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. Slide 370

  23. Research4 • Write routinely over extended time frames allowing time for research, reflection, and revision, as well as writing in shorter time frames, such as a single day or two, for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. • Slide 371-379 • Slides 108-130

  24. Comprehension&Collaboration1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on Grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. Slide 380

  25. Comprehension&Collaboration1a Come prepared to discuss assignments, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. Slide 381

  26. Comprehension&Collaboration1b Follow rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. Slide 382-383

  27. Comprehension&Collaboration1c Pose questions that connect the ideas of several speakers, and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant evidence, observations, and ideas. Slide 383

  28. Comprehension&Collaboration1d Acknowledge new information expressed by others, and when warranted, qualify or justify their own views in light of the evidence presented. Slide 384

  29. Comprehension&Collaboration2 Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse media and formats, and evaluate the motives behind its presentation. Slide 385 Slide 455

  30. Comprehension&Collaboration3 Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the evidence and identifying when irrelevant evidence is introduced. Slide 358

  31. Comprehension&Collaboration4 Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence , sound, reasoning that is valid and well-chosen details; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. Slides 352-357. Whether students are working on oral or written reports, ideas and information for preparing the reports are essentially the same.

  32. Comprehension&Collaboration5 Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest. Slide 351

  33. Comprehension&Collaboration6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. Slide 350

  34. Conventions Of Standard English1 Demonstrate command of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. {See the following slides’ breakdown of various facets of this goal with their respective references.}

  35. Conventions Of Standard English1a Explain the function of verbals: gerunds, present participles, past participles, and infinitives, both in general and their functions in particular sentences. Slides 155-157 Slides 198-199 Slides 266-273

  36. Conventions Of Standard English1bActive and Passive Voice Use verbs in both active voice and passive voice. Slide 178-192, Slide 202-209 Irregular Verb List = 210-219 Sine qua non for passive voice mastery. Analyze the morphosis of pronouns from subject in active voice to object of a preposition in passive voice, as in: SHE wrote the e-mails. The e-mails were written by HER.

  37. Conventions Of Standard English1c Use verbs in five modes, or moods: Indicative (declarative) Imperative (command) Interrogative (question) Conditional (If. . . then. . .; would. . .would. . . ) Subjunctive (Never going to happen. . .) Slide 221, 219, 220, 457, 458

  38. Conventions Of Standard English1d Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in voice, time, mood, person, and number. Slide 345-349

  39. Conventions Of Standard English2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. Slide 158-164, Capital Letters Slide 165-177, Punctuation Slide 252-265, Spelling Slide Eighty-Nine to 130

  40. Conventions Of Standard English2a Use punctuation to indicate a pause or break: comma{,} ellipsis{. . .} dash{--}. Slide 166-169, comma Slide 167, ellipsis Slide 175, dash

  41. Conventions Of Standard English2b Use an ellipsis to indicate an omission. Slide 167

  42. Conventions Of Standard English2c Spell correctly. Slide 252-265.

  43. KnowledgeOfLanguage3 Use verbs in the active and passive voice as well as in the conditional and subjunctive moods to achieve particular effects. Use verbs in both active voice and passive voice. Slide 178-192, Slide 202-209, Passive Voice Slide 210-218, Irregular Verb List Conditional: Slide 221, 457 Subjunctive: Slide 221, 458

  44. VocabularyAcquisition&Use4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words or phrases based upon grade level reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. Slide 292-308 Slide 338

  45. VocabularyAcquisition&Use4a Use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. You can often figure it out. Determine the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph, or a word’s position or function in a sentence, as a clue to the unfamiliar word or phrase. If you think a word is important to understanding the text, ask someone what it means or look it up so you can understand the text. Slide 338, Slide 292-308

  46. VocabularyAcquisition&Use4b Use common Greek or Latin prefixes, suffixes, and roots as clues to the meaning of a word or phrase. Bilingual dictionaries, English-only dictionaries, Glossaries Slide 292-308

  47. VocabularyAcquisition&Use4c Consult general and specialized reference materials, both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech. Bilingual dictionaries, English-only dictionaries , Glossaries Slide 292-308

  48. VocabularyAcquisition&Use4d Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase. Bilingual dictionaries, English-only dictionaries , Glossaries Slide 274-308

  49. VocabularyAcquisition&UseFigurative&ConnotativeLanguage5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. Slide 323-325

  50. VocabularyAcquisition&UseFigurative&ConnotativeLanguage5a Interpret figures of speech in context, such as verbal irony or puns. Slide 323-333