An Introduction to Academic Integrity and Plagiarism - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

vin
an introduction to academic integrity and plagiarism n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
An Introduction to Academic Integrity and Plagiarism PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
An Introduction to Academic Integrity and Plagiarism

play fullscreen
1 / 49
Download Presentation
Presentation Description
61 Views
Download Presentation

An Introduction to Academic Integrity and Plagiarism

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. An Introduction to Academic Integrity and Plagiarism WRITE PLACE Email: writeplace@udayton.edu Web: go.udayton.edu/writeplace FALL 2013

  2. Quiz Question 1 Answer True or False. Taking small bits of information from the Internet/Web and using it as my own work to complete an assignment is plagiarism.

  3. Quiz Question 1 TRUE! Taking small bits of information from the Internet/Web and using it as my own work to complete an assignment is plagiarism.

  4. Today we will discuss…. “Rather fail with honor than succeed by fraud.” --Sophocles What is definition of academic integrity and plagiarism? What does it mean to cite? What resources are available to help me?

  5. Learn. Lead. Serve. “The University of Dayton expects all members of the academic community to strive for excellence in scholarship and in character.” Academic Honor Code


  6. Honor Pledge: Commitment to Academic Integrity • I pledge to: • Complete all assignments and examinations by the guidelines given to me by my instructors, • Avoid PLAGIARISM and any other form of misrepresenting someone else's work as my own • Adhere to the Standards of Conduct as outlined in the Academic Honor Code. • In doing this, I hold myself and my community to a higher standard of excellence, and set an example for my peers to follow.

  7. Student Handbook • Visit Student Development Web Site • University of Dayton Student Handbook • Arabic Translation • Chinese Translation

  8. Visit Student Development Web Site at http://www.udayton.edu/studev/civility/index.php

  9. Visit Student Development Web Site at http://www.udayton.edu/studev/civility/index.php

  10. From IEP Instructor, April Darnell, University of Dayton, 2013

  11. Quiz Question 2 Answer True or False. Information on the Internet/Web is free for me to use any way I want; any free, electronic information is available for me to use as I desire.

  12. Quiz Question 2 • False! • Information on the Internet/Web is free for me to use any way I want; any free, electronic information is available for me to use as I desire.

  13. Quiz Question 3 Answer True or False. I do not have to cite the source of numerical data or graphs because they are not words in a paper. This is also true of something in a lecture or on TV; I don’t have to cite something that is not written.

  14. Quiz Question 3 False! I do not have to cite the source of numerical data or graphs because they are not words in a paper. This is also true of something in a lecture or on TV; I don’t have to cite something that is not written.

  15. It’s not just words! Source: Dummer, G. M., & Douglas, M. M. (September, 2008). Plagiarism. Paper presented at Responsible Conduct of Research Workshop, Michigan State University Graduate School, East Lansing, MI. Plagiarizing is also: Using IDEAS, PHOTOS, GRAPHS, ILLUSTRATIONS and calling them your own. Using METHODS OR PROCESSES described by another researcher without permission or credit. Fabricating experiment RESULTS. Sharing electronic FILES inappropriately or using someone’s file for your project.

  16. Quiz Question 4 Answer True or False. Plagiarism is ok if I am not caught because it only affects me and not others.

  17. Quiz Question 4 False! Plagiarism is ok if I am not caught because it only affects me and not others.

  18. Does Plagiarism hurt anyone? Consider this! • It is a form of theft. • A writer has “ownership” of his or her words. • It is a form of cheating. • It is unfair! • Unfair to the author of the source text. • Unfair to the writer of the paper. • Unfair to the writer’s peers. • Ultimately, you cheapen the value of your own education!

  19. Quiz Question 5 Answer True or False. If I buy a paper from an Internet/Web site that sells such things, my chance of being caught for plagiarism is low.

  20. Quiz Question 5 False! If I buy a paper from an Internet/Web site that sells such things, my chance of being caught for plagiarism is low.

  21. Why do students plagiarize? • Run out of time. • Fear that their writing or ideas are inadequate. • Lack of understanding regarding the severity of plagiarism— it’s stealing! • Believe the probability of getting caught is low. • Don’t realize they are doing it—improper documentation.

  22. Whose responsibility is it? • YOURS! • Possible Consequences: • Failing the assignment. • Failing the course. Students involved in academic dishonesty are subject to suspension by the University.

  23. Quiz Question 6 Answer True or False. Giving an incorrect reference for information I use is plagiarism.

  24. Quiz Question 6 True! Giving an incorrect reference for information I use is plagiarism. Even if you do it unintentionally!

  25. Quiz Question 7 Answer True or False. It is ok if I use a paper I wrote last year, change the title, and submit for a class assignment this year.

  26. Quiz Question 7 False! It is ok if I use a paper I wrote last year, change the title, and submit for a class assignment this year. You must cite yourself!

  27. What is Citing or Documenting? • Writing and research method to avoid plagiarism. • To quote or give reference to information acquired from another source that is used in your paper. • Shows your audience that you respect other’s intellectual property.

  28. What’s Your Style?Many Citation Styles MLA—English and other Humanities APA—Psycholgoy and Education Chicago/Turabian—Religious Studies, History ASA—Sociology AMA (American Management Association)—Business style guidelines

  29. Two Types of Citations • In-Text: Quoting and referencing ideas from other sources in the body of the paper. • End of Text: Providing a list of the resources used in the paper at the end of the paper.

  30. When do we give credit?

  31. How do I know when to cite? Another’s Words Another’s Ideas No need to Cite No No Yes Yes Cite Quote and Cite www.criticalthinkeracademy.com

  32. Resources Available to Help You • UD Libraries Research Guides • Academic Integrity • http://libguides.udayton.edu/avoidplagiarism • Citing Sources • http://libguides.udayton.edu/citingsources • UD Write Place • go.udayton.edu/writeplace • Email: writeplace@udayton.edu

  33. Write Place Encourage, guide, and support student writers during any stage of the writing process. 2012-2013 Staff Photo

  34. Write Place • Free peer- to-peer writing consultation session. • Roesch Library, Second Floor • Drop-In Hours : • Sunday from 4 to 8 p.m. • Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. • Friday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. • Contact: • writeplace@udayton.edu

  35. Like us on Facebook! “UD Write Place”

  36. BACK UP

  37. How do faculty check for plagiarism? • Leveraging web-based applications/plagiarism prevention services • Compares students’ paper content for originality and checks for improper citations • Turn It In • http://turnitin.com/static/index.html • Safe Assign • http://www.safeassign.com/

  38. Consider these real-life recent UD situations: Who’s responsibility is it? Two students work together on an assignment; each turn in separate papers but leverage the same concepts. Sally gives John a paper that she turned in for a class last semester. John has the same assignment this semester and uses about 80% of Sally’s paper. Missy procrastinates on an assignment; she turns to online sources to help her understand the book she does not have time to read. Missy takes ideas and words from the online sources and uses them in her paper without citations.

  39. APA In-Text Documentation Examples In his discussion of Monty Python routines, Crystal notes that the group relished “breaking the normal rules” of language (107). Gitlin (2001) pointed out that “political critics, convinced that the media are rigged against them, are often blind to other substantial reasons why their causes are unpersuasive” (p. 141). MLA In-Text

  40. APA Bibliography Book Documentation Examples Author’s Last Name, First Name. Book Title. City of publication: Name of Publisher, Publication Date. Print. Author’s Last Name, First and Middle Initials. (Date). Book Title. City of Publication: Name of Publisher. MLA Bibliography Book

  41. No Need to Cite or Give Credit • Using your own life experiences, observations and insights, thoughts and conclusions about a subject. • Using your own results obtained through lab or field experiments—primary research. • Using your own artwork, digital photographs, video, audio. • Using generally-accepted facts and common knowledge. • http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/589/02/

  42. What is Common Knowledge? Same information undocumented in at least five credible sources. Information known to your audience—generally accepted principle or concept. Information a person could easily find in general reference sources. But when in doubt, CITE! (MLA, APA, Chicago) http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/589/02/

  43. Needs Documentation Examples William Shakespeare was born in England during the 16th century. Asthma affects many children today. George Washington was the first president of the United States. Shakespeare earned about 200 pounds a year for his theater work. Childhood asthma rates have increased in Canada by 2% since 2001. George Washington was a military genius who helped to prevent political chaos in the US. Common Knowledge

  44. Let’s Avoid It! What can you do? • Do Your Own Work • Do your own research and write your own paper. • Get help from tutors (WRITE PLACE!) or others as needed, but be sure you can honestly take credit for the ideas or words in your paper that you do not document. • Take Good Notes While Conducting Research • Place quotation marks around quoted material in your notes. • Include full bibliographic information with your notes (don’t trust your memory). • Remember: RESEARCHING ETHICALLY ALSO MEANS RESEARCHING EFFICIENTLY!

  45. Let’s Avoid It! What can you do? • Clarify Collaboration Guidelines • Be sure you understand what forms of collaboration are acceptable in your class. • Be sure you understand how to acknowledge the help you receive on a paper. • If you have any questions, ask your instructor!

  46. Let’s Avoid It! What can you do? • Paraphrase Material Properly in Your Paper • When paraphrasing material, be sure you substantially change the language of the source text. • Place quotation marks around language that needs to be quoted. • Supply Proper Documentation • Document both quoted and paraphrased material. • Learn proper documentation practices for your discipline (MLA, APA, Chicago/Turabian)

  47. Let’s Avoid It! What can you do? • Manage your writing process • Don’t leave assignments go to the last minute. • Prewrite as soon as you get an assignment. Build an outline, brainstorm, develop a concept map. • Allow ample time to revise, checking in-text and end of text citations.

  48. http://www.cartoonstock.com/directory/p/plagiarism.asp Not even if your roommate gives you permission!