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Washington Wine Commission John Bookwalter Chairman August 27, 2009 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Washington Wine Commission John Bookwalter Chairman August 27, 2009. Washington Wine Industry. Phenomenal Growth 19 wineries in 1981, 650+ wineries today 147,436 tons harvested in 2008 8.5 million cases produced in 2008 11th AVA designated in April 2009

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Washington Wine CommissionJohn BookwalterChairmanAugust 27, 2009


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Washington Wine Industry

  • Phenomenal Growth

    • 19 wineries in 1981,650+ wineries today

    • 147,436 tons harvestedin 2008

    • 8.5 million casesproduced in 2008

    • 11th AVA designatedin April 2009

    • $4.7 billion impact tothe national economy

    • Growing national andinternational acclaim


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Washington Wine Industry

  • Record Acclaim

  • 277 wines received 90+ points from Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate (2008)

  • 123 wines awarded 90+ points by Stephen Tanzer’s International Wine Cellar (2008)

  • Long Shadows Vintners named “Winery of the Year” by Food & Wine Magazine (2007)

  • Bob Betz named “Winemaker of the Year” by Sunset Magazine (2007)

  • 4 Washington wineries named to “Top 100 in the World” by Robb Report

    • Andrew Will Winery

    • DeLille Cellars

    • Leonetti Cellar

    • Quilceda Creek


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Washington Wine Industry

  • Strong Sales (in spite of economy)

  • National Trends

  • Overall, wine continues to outperform beer and spirits – Americans have finally discovered wine

  • Domestic wines are outperforming imports (France down 21%)

  • Growth in wine sales continues to be led by premium segments ($9-12, $12-15, and $15-up all near double-digit growth), although trend has slowed somewhat with economy. Washington State is considered a premium region.

  • Riesling is the fastest growing major varietal (up 24.7% over last year). Washington State is one of the world’s leading producers of Riesling.


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Washington Wine Industry

  • Strong Sales (in spite of economy)

  • Local Trends

  • Washington State is the hottest wine region in the country – sales by value up 19% over last year (Oregon down 3.7%, California up 6.5%), sales by volume up 9.5% over last year (Oregon up 8%, California up 2%).

  • Washington State currently has a 4% share of the total wine market and a 7% share of the domestic wine market in the United States, roughly equivalent to Napa Valley.


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Washington Wine Industry

The Bottom Line…

  • Annual economic impact of $3 billion in-state, $4.7 billion nationally in 2006; up from $2.4 billion in 1999


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Washington Wine Industry

Direct Impacts

  • Revenues

  • $436 million in 2006, up from $289 million in 1999

  • Taxes

  • $145 million in-state, $58 million to other states, $269 million federally


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Washington Wine Industry

Indirect Impacts

  • Employment

  • $579 million in payroll supporting 19,000 jobs, up from $350 million and 11,000 jobs in 1999

  • Wine Tourism

  • $238 million in 2006, up from $19 million in 1999; a 1,157% increase


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Washington Wine Industry

  • Wine Tourism Booming

  • According to TIA, 17% of leisure travelers have engaged in wine and culinary travel – 27 million people

  • Washington State tourism is a $15 billion industry

  • Over 2 million people visit Washington wineries annually

  • Washington is among the top 15 states for food-related travel and the top 10 U.S. destinations for wine-related travel

  • Wine tourists typically stay longer (3.4 days) than average and spend more money in an area. More than 39% plan repeat visits

  • Washington wine country has seen a 29% increase in overnight visits in 3 years

  • Visitors to Washington wineries have a higher than average household income – $98,714 in 2006


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Washington Wine Commission

  • Represents

    • All bonded and licensed wineries in Washington

    • All wine grape growers in Washington

Mission

Raise positive awareness of the Washington wine industry and generate greater demand forits wines


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Washington Wine Commission

Board of Commissioners

  • John Bookwalter, ChairJ. Bookwalter Winery

  • Kent Waliser, Vice ChairSagemoor

  • Peggy Patterson, TreasurerHoodsport Winery

  • Ted BaselerSte. Michelle Wine Estates

  • Dick BousheyBoushey Vineyards

  • Glenn CooganAscentia Wine Estates

  • Peter DowCavatappi Winery

  • Patricia GellesKlipsun Vineyards

  • Eric HurlburtWSDA

  • Mark LevineYoung’s Market Company

  • Steve NewhouseUpland Vineyards

  • Rick SmallWoodward Canyon Winery

  • Jay SoloffDeLille Cellars


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Washington Wine Commission

  • Six Strategies

    • Increase consumer demand through direct marketing

    • Reach out to the wine trade

    • Strengthen the commitment and unity of the industry

    • Increase awareness of the industry’s economic impact

    • Foster viticultural and enological research

    • Encourage professional staff development


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Washington Wine Commission

  • Key Metrics

    • Increased consumer awareness of Washington wines

    • Increased media coverage of Washington wines

    • Increased sales of Washington wines in target markets

    • Increased traffic to the Wine Commission website


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Local Consumer Events

  • Branded tastings promoted as destinationevents

    • Taste Washington!

    • Held annually in Seattle, Spokaneand targeted markets

    • Educational Seminars

    • 20something

    • Millennial-targeted event heldtwice annually in Seattle


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Local Trade Outreach

  • Washington Wine Months

  • March – Taste Washington Wine Month

    • Restaurant and Retail Promotions

  • August – Washington Wine Month

    • Retail Promotions

  • Washington Wine Restaurant Awards

  • Taste Washington Seattle weekend


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National Consumer Marketing

  • National branding campaign

    • Advertising

    • Media Outreach

    • Trade and Consumer Tastings

  • Target Markets

    • Tampa Bay

    • Austin

    • Denver

    • Phoenix

    • Chicago


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National Trade Outreach

  • Road TripWashington Wine

  • October 4 - 8

  • 40 high-level national buyers

  • 50+ Washington wineries and vineyards participating


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International Marketing

  • Target Markets

    • Quebec

    • Japan

    • United Kingdom and Ireland

  • Japanese Deluxe Tour

    • Trade incentive program

  • Washington Wine Experience

    • International trade FAM tour

  • London Wine Fair

  • Montreal Trade Tasting


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Commitment to Research

  • 5% of Commission’s annual budget

  • Estimated $125,000 in 2009

  • Proceeds fromcharitable eventsdirected toeducation andresearch throughthe WashingtonWine EducationFoundation


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Looking ahead…

Now what?

  • Washington still only has a 7% share of the domestic wine market

  • Projecting a 5% increase in production each year over the next 5 years

  • Striving for a 10% share of the domestic 750ml market by 2011

  • Must address serious workforce, infrastructure and marketing issues


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Looking ahead…

How will we get there?

  • Position wine industry as an attraction/asset for business developmentand recruitment

  • Increase emphasis on wine tourism by leveraging state and localtourism efforts

  • Improve tourism infrastructure(e.g. signage, lodging, dining)

  • Reform state and federal liquor lawsand work with other regulatory bodies

  • Raise cross-functional industryknowledge (e.g. business finance,business operations, marketing)

  • Continue to invest in and growresearch and education programs


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Washington Wine Commission

Questions or comments?

Thank you!