slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Schizophrenia Famous schizophrenics : Hölderlin Maupassant Lenz Walser, Robert Proust Strindberg Lenau PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Schizophrenia Famous schizophrenics : Hölderlin Maupassant Lenz Walser, Robert Proust Strindberg Lenau

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 12

Schizophrenia Famous schizophrenics : Hölderlin Maupassant Lenz Walser, Robert Proust Strindberg Lenau - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 196 Views
  • Uploaded on

Schizophrenia Famous schizophrenics : Hölderlin Maupassant Lenz Walser, Robert Proust Strindberg Lenau. Prevalence 1 % throughout the world. Time course Begins during young adulthood: in males 21-25 years in females 28-32 years

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Schizophrenia Famous schizophrenics : Hölderlin Maupassant Lenz Walser, Robert Proust Strindberg Lenau' - venetia


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Schizophrenia

Famous schizophrenics:

Hölderlin

Maupassant

Lenz

Walser, Robert

Proust

Strindberg

Lenau

slide2

Prevalence

1 % throughout the world

slide3

Time course

Begins during young adulthood:

in males 21-25 years

in females 28-32 years

Generally progressive (if untreated)

Begins with

Positive symptoms

after years negative symptoms dominate

slide4

Positive symptoms

Disordered thoughts

Delusions (f.e. the belief that one is being persecuted

or that one‘s feelings, thoughts and actions are controlled

by an outside force

Hallucinations, usually auditory hearing voices

commenting on one‘s actions

Negative symptoms

Loss of normal association between ideas,

incoherence of ideas

Poverty of speech

Flattening, loss, or iadequate affect

Social withdrawal

slide6

Causes

Genetic disposition/vulnerability

Two hit hypothesis:

50% genetic 50 % second hit ???

Second hit: Birth hypoxia

Stress

Cannabis use

Psychostimulant use

slide7

Morphological findings

Enlargement of the 3rd ventricle

Reduced volume of the corpus callosum ???

Disturbed layerd arrangement of Hippocampus???

prefront. Cortex???

slide8

Neurochemical findings

Dopamine hypothesis:

A Dopamine hyperactivity underlies the disease

Regional selectivity hypothesis:

Dopamine hyperactivity in the meso-accumbal/limbic system

Dopamine hypoactivity in the prefrontal cortex

Glutamate hypothesis:

A Glutamate hypoactivity underlies the disease

slide9

Behavioural pharmacology

Animal models of Schizophrenia:

Pharmacological induction of dopamine hyperactivity

Pharmacological induction of glutamate hypoactivity

Developmental models

Genetic models (breeding the endophenotype)

slide10

Typical antipsychotics

Chlorpromazine, Haloperidol

Effect:block DA receptors; counteract mainly positive symptoms

Sideeffects: Parkinsonism

Atypical antipsychotics

Clozapine, Olanzapine, Sertindole,

Effect: Receptor?

counteract positive and negative symptoms/depression

Side effects: No parkinsonism

New generation

Aripiprazol

Partial Dopamine agonists: Anatgonists in n. accumbens

Agonists in prefront. cortex

slide11

Psychostimulant-induced psychosis

  • …the psychosis that arises from repeated administration of
  • cocaine or amphetamine results from sensitization…
  • (Robinson and Becker 1986)
  • A role for sensitization in psychostimulant-induced
  • Paranoia and psychosis
  • (Kalivas et al. Mojacar meeting 1998)
  • The development of psychostimulant psychosis requires a prolonged period
  • of abuse in nonschizophrenic individuals.
  • 2. Relapse psychosis can occur following reexposure to a lower dose of drug than that
  • associated with initial psychosis.
  • 3. Sensitivity to drug-induced psychosis persists even after years of abstinence,
  • indicating enduring psychostimulant-induced changes in neural function.
slide12

Schizophrenia and sensitization

Dysregulated dopamine/glutamate balance

Attribution of aberrant salience to stimuli,

Aberrant sense of novelty

Delusions to explain the aberrant salience

Antipsychotics block dopamine receptors

within hours

Dampening of salience of encountered stimuli

by way of desensitization/unlearning salience

within some weeks