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PowerPoint. and. Less is More. So, what could go wrong?. Any of these look familiar?. clicktoaddtitle.com Leslie Harpold – Round 2. Lorem Ipsum Dolor. “Neque porro quisquam est qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit…”. Lorem Ipsum Dolor. Curabitur sed

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less is more

PowerPoint

and

Less is More.

so what could go wrong

So, what could go wrong?

Any of these look familiar?

lorem ipsum dolor

clicktoaddtitle.com

Leslie Harpold – Round 2

Lorem Ipsum Dolor

“Neque porro quisquam est qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit…”

lorem ipsum dolor1
Lorem Ipsum Dolor
  • Curabitur sed
  • Nullam pretium
  • Mauris metus
  • Curabitur sed
lorem ipsum dolor2
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Nam erat justo, sagittis vitae, commodo ut, rhoncus lacus mit nonummy, ante.

Duis ligula augue, aliquam sit amet, rutrum a, gravida quis, lacus. Mauris quam. Phasellus a felis quis ipsum tincidunt vehicula. Morbi elementum dapibus est.

Lorem Ipsum Dolor
lorem ispum dolor
Lorem Ispum Dolor!

“Nam erat justo, sagittis vitae, commodo ut, rhoncus nonummy, ante. Duis ligula augue, aliquam sit amet, rutrum a, gravida quis, lacus. Mauris quam. Phasellus a felis”

lorem ipsum dolor4
LOREM IPSUM DOLOR

Ipsum Dolor!

  • Mauris quam. Phasellus a felis . Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere
slide11

Graphic Design is not:

just making it look “pretty”.

What it is . . .

Graphic Design is:

  • a strategic usage of text
  • the purposeful use of pictures and animation
  • focused on directing visual communication
slide12

typography and fonts

Use sans-serif type, no more than three styles

Consider darkest green, navy blue text

  • use color blocks

Frame pieces of text within blocks of light colorOrganizes information for audience

your

Improving design!

Top Ten Suggestions

  • use “dim” option with large chunks of text – sequential disclosure
slide13

pictures

Pictures which illustrate informationNothing ‘cause it’s cute or cool!

  • background – white/light – dark text

Will work for any type of lighting situation

  • keep lower ¼ of slide empty or a filler – less importance

Depending on screen height and seating,

not everyone will be able to see slide.

your

Improving design!

Top Ten Suggestions

slide14

keep text animations consistent

Text best read “wipe” “left”, “wipe” “down”

Stay away from entering left, fly ins, anythingsurprising to audience – not a horror movie

your

Improving design!

  • keep images directing towards information

Top Ten Suggestions

  • sounds are found to be more annoyance than assistance
slide15

your

Improving design!

  • slides are free – don’t crowd
  • slides are free – don’t crowd
  • slides are free – don’t crowd

Top Ten Suggestions

Allow white space around your information.

which font should you use
Which font should you use?

Fonts/Blocks

Beginning February 1, 2004, all State Department correspondence must be in ‘Times New Roman 14’.

The US State Departmentbanned the use of ‘Courier New 12’ in all official correspondence.

So should we follow the lead of the government and use Times New Roman in all of our PowerPoint presentations?

slide17

The US State Departmentbanned the use of ‘Courier New 12’ in all official correspondence.

Design Tips

use of color blocks

  • color blocks for listings of like pieces of information: three to five points or usually sub-content of key point.

Example:

The US State Departmentbanned the use of ‘Courier New 12’ in all official correspondence.

which font should you use1
Which font should you use?

Fonts/Blocks

Beginning February 1, 2004, all State Department correspondence must be in ‘Times New Roman 14’.

The US State Departmentbanned the use of ‘Courier New 12’ in all official correspondence.

So should we follow the lead of the government and use Times New Roman in all of our PowerPoint presentations?

which font should you use2

Beginning February 1, 2004, all State Department correspondence must be in ‘Times New Roman 14’.

The US State Departmentbanned the use of ‘Courier New 12’ in all official correspondence.

So should we follow the lead of the government and use Times New Roman in all of our PowerPoint presentations?

Which font should you use?
research results
Research results

In subjective tests measuring how people judge the screen readability of different typefaces (from 0 to 5), most people prefer Verdana. (Hoffman, 2004)

screen v print font
Screen v. print font
  • Verdana, Trebuchet, Georgia, Geneva, and New York are all examples of screen display fonts, fonts specifically designed to look good on a computer screen.
  • Times New Roman, Arial, and Helvetica are actually print display fonts, fonts specifically designed to look good on paper.
  • People strongly and consistently judge screen display fonts to be easier to read than print display fonts. (Hoffman)
serif v sans serif
Serif v. sans-serif
  • On paper, people prefer reading serif fonts—fonts with a “tail” (like Times New Roman.)
  • On screens, however, prefer sans-serif fonts—fonts without a tail (like Verdana).
  • So, use serif fonts (like Times New Roman) for your handouts and a sans-serif font (like Verdana or Arial) for your on-screen presentation.
slide24

Design Tips

Typography and fonts

  • no more than three fonts per presentation

- One for your Title and Headers- One for your content- One for an accent: “New”, “Know”, “Activity”, etc.

- use the variations of a single font: example: Arial - Bold, Italic, Bold Italic -variationsonly count as one single font

slide25

Design Tips

use of text on slide

  • keep to maximum of five to seven lines of informational text
  • use minimal of 24 points for content information 28 points is better
  • be consistent with the choice of font and font size for:Headers Information text- bullet points
slide26

Slide Heading/Topic Heading - 32

Information text be 28

Information text be 28

  • bullet points might always be 24 pt.
  • bullet points might always be 24 pt.

Information text be 28

  • bullet points might always be 24 pt.
backgrounds
Backgrounds
  • Stay away from any background with animation – Ribbons.
  • Use light colored backgrounds with dark text.

Unless you have a single important point.Then use a color box to frame information.

  • Gradient backgrounds rarely work well.
backgrounds1
Backgrounds
  • Stay away from any background with animation – Ribbons.
  • Use light colored backgrounds with dark text.

Unless you have a single important point.Then use a color box to frame information.

  • Gradient backgrounds rarely work well.
backgrounds2
Backgrounds
  • Stay away from any background with animation – Ribbons.
  • Use light colored backgrounds with dark text.

Unless you have a single important point.Then use a color box to frame information.

  • Gradient backgrounds rarely work well.
slide32

Creative Text

Creating interesting textfor Titles and Headings.

slide33

Color

Value

Changes

Adding Contrast

Thin and thick lines

Cool Colors

Warm Colors

Rough

Smooth and

Sans Serif fonts with

Serif fonts

Just one color

W i d e spacing and

Different

Narrow spacing

Levels

or font size

slide35

P

owerpoint

program

resource

PowerPoint Resource Program

program

powerpoint

PowerPoint

Resource Program

slide41

Picture Placement

Placing pictures/graphics

to keep audience focused.

slide42

images/graphics will:

- be relevant to the material being presented - support the ideas being explained - have a purpose or relationship to the concepts

Design Tips

images: helpful or hurtful

  • images/graphics will not:

- be distracting or annoying to the viewer - be used because they are “cute” or “cool”

slide43

Design Tips

images: helpful or hurtful

  • your audience will look in the direction of your graphic image if:

- the image has eyes - the image portrays movement

- the image suggests directionality

  • images always look towards your information and move towards your content and printed texts
slide44

Design Tips

where does it go?

1.

2.

3.

4.

slide45

Design Tips

where does it go?

1.

2.

3.

4.

slide46

Design Tips

where does it go?

1.

2.

3.

4.

slide47

Design Tips

Directionality of graphics

Directionality and the brain

  • Your brain will follow repeated colors
  • Shapes/images which create a point
  • Easiest movement to guide is from:
  • - left to right (increase, decrease)
  • - downward (gravity experience)
slide48

Directionality

Eye gaze path

Left to right

Topto Bottom

Dead ZoneLower Left Corner

slide49

Design Tips

Examples of how print adsdirect your eyes … sometimes.

slide54

Directionality

of images and clip art

When Direction Goes Bad!

Going The Wrong Way

slide67

Dead Zone

The ‘Good and the Bad’of the Dead Zone.

slide70

Picture Placement

Strong “Downward” Designs

slide77

Key Points

  • Keep graphics ‘moving’ towards your information
  • Limit use of animations to two to threeper presentation – be consistent
  • Use plain or very light background
  • Only use sound if your information makes a sound or, use small amount of music in introduction
  • Keep slides free from ‘text clutter’ – use dimming