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Key Words : On mini-whiteboards match up the letter to the letter to show the correct meaning. Friday 20 th September 2013. HISTORY. Challenging the view of poverty. Seebohm Rowntree. Learning Objectives: To identify what the Victorian idea of poverty was until 1905.

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challenging the view of poverty

Friday 20th September 2013

HISTORY

Challenging the view of poverty.

Seebohm Rowntree

Learning Objectives:

To identify what the Victorian idea of poverty was until 1905.

To analyse 3 reformers who challenged the idea of poverty and what they discovered.

To evaluate the reliability of 2 sources.

Charles Booth

today s learning
Learning Outcomes

All: Will be able to state the Victorian idea of poverty.

Most: Will be able to explain the findings of 3 reformers.

Some: Will be able to explain how the reforms discoveries challenged the Victorian idea of poverty.

Historical Skills

Enquiry

Using evidence

Thinking Skills

Today’s learning…
slide4

Background 1890-1905.

The Great Race!

1) By 1890 what were the hours of work and wages like for ordinary people?

  • Instructions:
  • Working as a table you need to complete the questions.
  • However, you only get one question at a time, I will then check your answer and give you the next question.
  • The first group to answer all the questions win.
  • Use BDS p8-9 to help you.

Learning objective 1: To identify what the Victorian idea of poverty was until 1905.

slide5

Living conditions?

Three circles?

Pit-stop 3min

Salvation army?

Had poverty been solved by 1905?

How had the Victorian idea of poverty changed?

Blame?

slide6

Charles Booth/Seebohm Rowntree.

  • Instructions:
  • Read p10-11 of BDS.
  • Arrange the cards under the appropriate name.
  • Stick them into your books.

Extended: On a whiteboard can you list any categories you can arrange the information into?

Learning objective 1: To analyse 3 reformers who challenged the idea of poverty and what they discovered.

slide7

Charles Booth/Seebohm Rowntree.

Instructions:

Colour code the information under booth and Rowntree.

Why they became involved in the study.

Details about their investigation. (When, where, name)

What did their investigation reveal about poverty?

How did their investigations challenge the Victorian idea of poverty?

Learning objective 2: To analyse 3 reformers who challenged the idea of poverty and what they discovered.

slide8

Living conditions?

Poverty?

Pit-stop 3min

Salvation army?

What did Booth and Rowntree agree on?

How had the Victorian idea of poverty changed?

Blame?

Learning objective 2: To analyse 3 reformers who challenged the idea of poverty and what they discovered.

who am i
Who am I?
  • I was not related to the people in the Salvation’s army.
  • Booth
  • I printed 17 volumes of my 17 year study.
  • Booth
  • I was from York and carried out research here for two years.
  • Rowntree
  • My reports were called : Life and Labour of the People in London.
  • Booth
  • I was interested in an earlier reformers work.
  • Rowntree
who am i1
Who am I?
  • I looked into poverty as I thought the reports were exaggerated. I found they were actually underestimated.
  • Charles Booth
  • I collected masses of information about the poor living in London.
  • Charles Booth
  • I believed in primary and secondary poverty.
  • Rowntree
who am i2
Who am I?
  • My book was called Poverty: a study of Town life.
  • Rowntree
  • I found about 30 % were living under the poverty line. (Unable to afford decent food, clothing and accommodation.)
  • Charles Booth
  • I found around 27 % of the population of York lived in poverty.
  • Rowntree
  • I showed that the Victorian idea that poverty was the fault of the poor themselves was not true.
  • Both
  • I developed the idea of the poverty line and divided it into primary and secondary poverty. Primary poverty was the worse.
  • Rowntree
  • My book influenced MPs- people in position to help the poor.
  • Both
slide12

What makes a source reliable?

  • -A source based on one persons experience.-A source based on more than one persons experience.
  • -A source that was produced at the time.-A source that was produced after the event.
  • -A one sided source.-A well balanced source.
  • -A source can be backed up with evidence.-A source stands on its own.

Learning objective 3: To evaluate the reliability of 2 sources..

slide13

Reliability questions.

  • With trust/ reliability questions you need to think about:
  • Which one represents a wider view of society?
  • Who were they produced for and why?
  • Look at the language used in each source- is it biased? Does this affect its reliability?
  • What knowledge supports the source detail?

Study sources B and C in BDS p74-75.

Answer the question: Is one source more reliable than the other to an Historian studying poverty at the beginning of the 20C?

Learning objective 3: To evaluate the reliability of 2 sources..

slide14

How reliable is this source?

Source B.

Under the window facing the door is the large bed, in which sleep mother, father and two children. A baby is asleep in a pram by the bed and another child is asleep in a cot in the corner. The second window can be, and is, left partly open at night. At the foot of the bed is a small table. Three wooden chairs and a chest of drawers complete the furniture. The small fireplace has no over, and open shelves go up each side of it. There are two saucepans, both burnt. There is no larder.

From Round about a Pound a Week by Maud Pember Peeves, published in 1913. She is describing a room in Lambeth, south London, lived in by one family in the early year of the twentieth century.

Learning objective 3: To evaluate the reliability of 2 sources..

slide15

Peer assessment.

  • Swap books with someone on your table.
  • Highlight the following information in their answer. (NB: Each source should refer to all 5 points).
  • With trust/ reliability questions you need to think about:
  • Which one represents a wider view of society?
  • Who were they produced for and why?
  • Look at the language used in each source- is it biased? Does this affect its reliability?
  • What knowledge supports the source detail?

Learning objective 3: To evaluate the reliability of 2 sources..