Human Origins in Africa - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

varen
human origins in africa n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Human Origins in Africa PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Human Origins in Africa

play fullscreen
1 / 42
Download Presentation
Human Origins in Africa
124 Views
Download Presentation

Human Origins in Africa

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Human Origins in Africa Chapter 1: Sec. 1

  2. Students will: • Describe key scientific findings about humanorigins. • List human achievements during the Stone Age. • Trace emergence of modern humans. • State discoveries about early humans.

  3. Skills Objectives • Categorizing • Forming and Supporting Opinions • Making Inferences • Drawing Conclusions • Recognizing Effects • Comparing • Geography • Environment Interaction • Synthesizing

  4. Focus and Motivate ❑ Interact with History ❑ Discuss MAIN IDEA: Fossil evidence shows that the earliest humans originated in Africa and spread across the globe. ❑ Discuss WHY IT MATTERS NOW : The study of early human remains and artifacts helps in understanding our place in human history.

  5. Vocabulary and Homework Define the following Terms and Names • ARTIFACT • CULTURE • HOMINID • PALEOLITHIC AGE • NEOLITHIC AGE • TECHNOLOGY • HOMO SAPIENS PAGE 11 • QUESTIONS 3, 4 ,and 5

  6. Early Human Migration

  7. Scientists Search for Human Origins • What were the earliest Humans like? • Scientists use a variety of ways to research and learn more about how, when and where early humans developed. • Archaeologists are specially trained scientists who work like detectives to uncover the story of prehistoric people.

  8. Since prehistoric human did not have written language • It is necessary to learn from existing evidence left behind such as bones and artifacts. • Artifacts are human made objects such as tools and • jewelry …. These items might hint at how people lived, • worked, dressed, and perhaps if they had a belief system

  9. Components of Culture • Common Practices • What people eat, wear, jewelry, • What sports or games they play • Tools and Technology • Social Customs • Work

  10. What is Culture? • Shared Understandings • Language • Symbols • Religion • Values • Arts, music • Political beliefs

  11. Social Organization • Family • Class and caste structure • Relationships between individuals and community • Government • Economic systems • View of authority

  12. How Culture is Learned

  13. Early Hominids • 1970’s in East Africa footprints found resembling those of humans • Found by Dr. Mary Leakey these • prints belong to a hominid • now know as australopithecines

  14. The Discovery of Lucy 1974 Ethiopia Africa The oldest human remains found A female hominid Lucy was only 1.1 m (3 ft. 7 in) tall, weighed 29 kg (64 lbs.) and looked somewhat like a Common Chimpanzee

  15. Human Evolution

  16. Old Stone Age (Paleolithic Age) • 2.5 million to 8000 BCE • Invention of tools, mastery of Fire, development of Language

  17. Paleolithic Hunter / Gatherer

  18. Chapter 1 Sec. 2 Humans try to Control Nature • Objectives: Students will • • List technological and artistic achievements of the Paleolithic Age. • • Describe the Neolithic Revolution. • • Explain the growth of villages.

  19. Skills • Outlining • Analyzing Primary Sources • Making Inferences • Skill builder: Map • Summarizing

  20. FOCUS AND MOTIVATE Discuss MAIN IDEA: The development of agriculture caused an increase in population and the growth of a settled way of life. Discuss WHY IT MATTERS NOW: New methods for obtaining food and the development of technology laid the foundations for modern civilizations.

  21. Vocabulary and Homework • Nomad • Hunter-gatherer • Neolithic revolution • Slash and burn farming • Domestication • Page 19 • Questions 3, 4, and 5

  22. Paleolithic Humans ( Old Stone Age)

  23. Neolithic Human (New Stone Age)

  24. Eskimos in Alaska ca. 1910

  25. Birth of Agriculture Slash and Burn Farming

  26. Neolithic Revolution • Making of tools

  27. ATLATL

  28. Domestication of Animals • Wolf Dog

  29. Religion: Stonehenge England

  30. Inukshuk Greenland & Canada

  31. Chapter 1 Sec. 3 Civilization Ur Objectives Students will • Explain how villages grew into cities. • List the characteristics of civilization. • Describe how the city of Ur exemplifies early civilizations

  32. Skills Summarizing Drawing Conclusions Making Inferences Analyzing Causes Recognizing Effects

  33. FOCUS AND MOTIVATE Discuss MAIN IDEA: Prosperous farming villages, food surpluses, and new technology led to the rise of civilizations. Discuss WHY IT MATTERS NOW: Contemporary civilizations share the same characteristics typical of ancient civilizations.

  34. Vocabulary and Homework • Civilization • Specialization • Artisan Questions Page 23 • Institution Numbers 1, 3, 4, and 5 • Scribe • Cuneiform • Bronze Age • Barter • Ziggurat

  35. Civilization Case Study “Ur” • How Civilization Develops • 1. Advanced Cities • 2. Specialized Workers • 3. Complex Institutions4. Record Keeping • 5. Advanced Technology

  36. Advanced Cities • Village or City is not determined by its size of population but rather its design. • City center to foster trade and markets • Centers for religious observance • Site for retail and trade shops

  37. Specialized Workers • Persons that do a particular job or task artisan Merchants Government officials Soldiers Metal workers Priests Scribes Farmers Weavers

  38. Complex Institutions • Formal System of Government • Priests with official political and religious authority; Religious ceremony • Education to train those in a specific job such as scribes Need to learn established written language cuneiform

  39. Improved Technology • Potters Wheel • Metal work---Bronze ( 88% copper 12% tin )

  40. City of Ur

  41. Quiz Hints • How did the surplus of food help develop specialization of work? • Why does a city such as Ur need a formal Government? • Why did record keeping become important in Ur?