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Concerto for 2 Violins, Strings, and Continuo in D Minor, BWV 1043: I. Vivace PowerPoint Presentation
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Concerto for 2 Violins, Strings, and Continuo in D Minor, BWV 1043: I. Vivace. Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750). This is Bach’s only concerto for 2 violins (2 soloists). Composed for strings and continuo (note the use of the harpsichord). Note the long introduction before the soloists appear.

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Concerto for 2 Violins, Strings, and Continuo in D Minor, BWV 1043: I. Vivace

  • Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
  • This is Bach’s only concerto for 2 violins (2 soloists)
  • Composed for strings and continuo (note the use of the harpsichord)
  • Note the long introduction before the soloists appear
  • Listen for the interplay between the solo violins
  • Listen for repetitions (at least partial or altered) of the opening orchestral material that serves as bridges between the passages played by the soloists
  • Note how the music maintains a constant rhythmic pulse – called “motor-rhythmic” – this is common for music of the Baroque
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Violin concerto in E minor, Op. 64: III. Allegro Molto Vivace

  • Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)
  • Violin concerto in 3 movements, premiered in 1845
  • Composed for a particular soloist in mind, his childhood friend Ferdinand David
  • Unique in the fact that the three movements are linked, with no pause between them
  • Composed for violin soloist and full classical orchestra (not as large an orchestra as Brahms used)
  • Eliminates long orchestral introduction that was common before (note the trumpet fanfare that begins the movement
  • Structured in sonata form (exposition, development, recapitulation – and coda)
  • Note how the solo violin part is technically demanding – Mendelssohn conferred constantly with David over a 6-year period composing the piece
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Violin Concerto No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 26: Vorspiel (Allegro Moderato)

  • Max Bruch (1838-1920)
  • German composer, teacher, and conductor of the Romantic Era
  • Composed over 200 pieces, including 3 violin concertos
  • His Violin Concerto #1 in G minor employs many of the same techniques as Mendelssohn’s, including eliminating the long orchestral introduction and linking of the three movements
  • Note the opening of the soloist’s material is almost improvisational
  • Listen for how the solo part is technically demanding (like Mendelssohn)
  • Listen also for the frequent use of “double-stops” by the soloist (two notes played simultaneously) and trills (rapidly moving back and forth between two notes)
  • Music is passionate, seductive, full of emotion
  • Not as structured as Classical and Baroque works (unlike Mendelssohn’s concerto)
  • New melodies, ideas are introduced throughout
  • there are many changes in tempo and mood throughout
  • Listen for the opening “improvisatory” solo material returns towards the end