chapter 1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
CHAPTER 1: PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
CHAPTER 1:

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 40

CHAPTER 1: - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 116 Views
  • Uploaded on

CHAPTER 1:. THE SOCIOLOGICAL IMAGINATION. WHAT IS SOCIOLOGY?. The systematic study of social interaction at a variety of levels. 1. Interaction – Individuals. 1. Interaction between individuals A dating couple Co-workers. Interaction –Groups. 1. Interaction between groups

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'CHAPTER 1:' - valora


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
chapter 1

CHAPTER 1:

THE SOCIOLOGICAL IMAGINATION

what is sociology
WHAT IS SOCIOLOGY?

The systematic study of social interaction at a variety of levels

1

slide3

Interaction–Individuals

1

  • Interaction between individuals
    • A dating couple
    • Co-workers
slide4

Interaction–Groups

1

  • Interaction between groups
    • Newcomers and old-timers in a community
    • High school cliques
slide5

Interaction–Nations

1

  • Interaction between nations
    • Immigration patterns
    • Economic globalization
slide6

Beyond Common Sense

Sociology goes beyond what we call common sense in several ways

but i m unique
But I'm Unique!

1

Some people object to the systematic study of interaction.

They argue that interaction is not patterned and regular.

application
Application
  • What would happen if we didn't have patterned interactions?
    • Traffic
    • Shopping
    • Conversation
why do we need sociology
Why Do We Need Sociology?

1

Some people argue that sociology is just common sense.

It makes the obvious difficult.

application10
Application

True/False: The death penalty reduces crime.

True/False: Living together decreases the chance of getting divorced.

True/False: Opposites attract.

slide11

1

These and many other common sense ideas are false.

A systematic study of interaction can show us what really happens.

sociology goes beyond common sense
Sociology Goes Beyond Common Sense.

1

Common sense often distorts reality.

Common sense is often contradictory.

Common sense perceptions change over time.

Much of our common sense is based on myths and misconceptions.

the sociological imagination
THE SOCIOLOGICAL IMAGINATION

2

According to C. Wright Mills, the sociological imagination is the ability to see the connection between individual lives and larger social influences.

slide14

Sociological Imagination

2

The sociological imagination sees the connection between personal troubles (biography) and structural (public and historical) issues.

application15
Application
  • How could each of these situations be both a trouble and an issue?
    • Divorce
    • Unemployment
    • Violence
microsociology
Microsociology

2

  • Focuses on small-scale patterns of individuals' social interaction in specific settings
    • Individuals interacting as friends
    • Patterns of interaction within families
macrosociology
Macrosociology

2

  • Focuses on large-scale patterns and processes that characterize society as a whole
    • Comparison of divorce rates for different countries
    • Effect of trade policies on unemployment rates
why is sociology important
Why is sociology important?

2

  • It can help us make informed decisions.
    • Should we live together before marriage?
    • Should the U.S. increase the minimum wage?
slide19

Sociology and Diversity

2

  • Sociology can help us understand diversity.
    • Who are the non-Hispanic whites?
    • What happens when men work in traditionally female occupations?
slide20

Sociology and Policy

2

  • Sociology can help us evaluate social and public policies.
    • Does a curfew for teenagers effectively reduce crime?
    • Should the United States have government provided health care?
origins of sociological thinking
ORIGINS OF SOCIOLOGICAL THINKING

3

  • Auguste Comte
    • The "father of sociology"
    • Argued for the empirical study of society
    • Analyzed social statics and dynamics
slide22

Emile Durkheim

3

Analyzed social facts, social solidarity, division of labor, and social integration

Conducted study of suicide and social integration

slide23

Karl Marx

3

Analyzed Industrial Revolution

Studied capitalism, class conflict, and alienation

slide24

Max Weber

3

Argued for the importance of ideas, ideologies, and charismatic leaders

Argued for verstehen or subjective understanding

Argued for value-free sociology

discussion
Discussion

3

Is it possible to be a value free sociologist?

Should sociology be value free?

slide26

Other Social Thinkers

3

  • Other important early social thinkers included:
    • Harriet Martineau
    • Jane Addams
    • W. E. B. Du Bois
contemporary sociological theories
CONTEMPORARY SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES

4

A theory is a set of statements that explains why a phenomenon occurs.

Theories are tools and evolve over time.

the perspectives
The Perspectives

4

  • Functionalism
    • How does structure help society work?
  • Conflict
    • How are resources distributed?
  • Feminist
    • How does life reflect gender?
  • Interactionism
    • How do we construct meaning through symbols?
functionalism
Functionalism

4

Society is a complex system of interdependent parts that work together to ensure a society's survival.

Functions are purposes and activities to meet different needs that contribute to a society's stability

slide30

Functionalism

4

Manifest functions are intended and recognized.

Latent functions are unintended and unrecognized.

Dysfunctions have negative impacts

application31
Application
  • The cell phone
    • What are the manifest functions?
    • What are the latent functions?
    • What are the dysfunctions?
  • Divorce
    • What are the manifest functions?
    • What are the latent functions?
    • What are the dysfunctions?
conflict theory
Conflict Theory

4

Conflict theory examines the ways in which groups disagree, struggle over power, and compete for scarce resources.

Karl Marx predicted that conflict would result from widespread economic inequality.

slide33

Conflict Theory

4

The "haves" dominate in social, political, and economic activities over the "have-nots."

discussion34
Discussion

4

In what ways is your education influenced by whether you are a "have" or a "have-not?"

Do kids from wealthy families have an advantage in sports?

feminist theories
Feminist Theories

4

Feminist theories explain the social, economic, and political position of women in society.

They maintain that women suffer injustice because of their sex.

They seek to free women from traditionally oppressive expectations and constraints.

discussion36
Discussion

4

In what ways do women have less power than men in our society?

Should women serve in combat?

symbolic interactionism
Symbolic Interactionism

4

Symbolic interactionism looks at individuals' everyday behavior and communication through symbols and shared meanings.

It is a micro-level perspective.

Interactionists see society as socially constructed.

application39
Application

Why is it a particular day of the week?

How does a dating couple indicate that they are a together?

How do we define the different racial categories that people are assigned?

How do we know how to feel about a war?