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Apply the Brigade Fight Concept to Operational Planning. Terminal Learning Objective.

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terminal learning objective
Terminal Learning Objective

Action:Identify the mission, capabilities and limitations, organization and functions, and battlefield focus of the divisional and separate heavy maneuver brigade and tactical considerations in employing both types of brigades in the course of offensive, defensive, and retrograde operations.

Conditions:Given information on the mission, capabilities and limitations, organization and functions, and battlefield focus of the divisional and separate heavy maneuver brigade and tactical considerations in employing both types of brigades in the course of offensive, defensive, and retrograde operations, from both readings and instruction in a classroom environment and given a closed book test on the aforementioned material.

Standard:Correctly identify and communicate information on the missioncapabilities and limitations, organization and functions, and battlefield focus of the divisional and separate heavy maneuver brigade and tactical considerations in employing both types of brigades in the course of offensive, defensive, and retrograde operations, with an 80 percent accuracy rate and in accordance with FM 71-3, in order to allow the development of courses of action which are suitable, feasible, and acceptable based on the current and anticipated tactical situation.

brigades
Brigades
  • Mission
  • Capabilities
  • Limitations
  • Organization
  • Functions
brigade missions
Brigade Missions
  • Deploy on short notice.
  • Use maneuver and shock effect to destroy, capture, or repel enemy forces.
  • Conduct various OOTW activities.
  • Operate as part of a joint or combined force.
  • Normally function under the control of a division headquarters but may operate separately under the control of a corps.
capabilities and limitations of the brigade
Capabilities:

Conducts sustained combat operations

Accomplishes rapid movement and deep penetrations

Exploits success and pursues a defeated enemy

Conducts security operations

Conducts defensive, retrograde, and other operations

Conducts offensive operations

Conducts operations with light and special operations forces

Conducts OOTW

Deploys rapidly and secures pre-positioned equipment

Limitations:

Mobility and firepower are restricted by:

Urban areas.

Dense jungles and forests

Very steep and rugged terrain

Significant water obstacles

Strategic mobility is limited by heavy equipment

Consumption of Classes III, V, and IX supplies is extremely high

Capabilities and Limitations of the Brigade
organization and functions of a divisional brigade
Organization:

Combination of armored and mechanized infantry battalions

May have an aviation battalion or task force OPCON

May have a light infantry battalion attached

Other supporting units are grouped under the command of the brigade headquarters

CS and CSS units are task organized to the brigade as necessary

Normally operates as part of a division or corps

Functions:

Performs tactical tasks under command of a division, corps, or joint task force headquarters

Participates in division or corps operations according to the principles and concepts in FM 71-100 and FM 100-15

Task organizes as directed

Organization and Functions of a Divisional Brigade
divisional brigade organization

X

HHC

DS

SIG

MP

SPT

DS

DS

DS

HHC

MED

S&T

MAINT

Divisional Brigade Organization
organization and functions of a separate brigade
Organization:

Brigade HHC to provide command and control

Armored and mechanized infantry battalions

An armored cavalry troop

An engineer battalion

A military intelligence company

A FA battalion to provide DS fire support

A support battalion of several support units

Limited CS assets to include MP, chemical, and air defense assets

Normally operates under corps command, but may be attached to a division

Organized to provide their own support

Functions:

Performs tactical tasks under command of a division, corps, or joint task force headquarters

Participates in division or corps operations according to the principles and concepts in FM 71-100 and FM 100-15

Task organizes as directed

Organization and Functions of a Separate Brigade
separate brigade organization

X

MI

HHC

SIG

MP

SPT

DS

HHC

MED

S&T

MAINT

Separate Brigade Organization
brigade battlefield focus
Brigade Battlefield Focus
  • Primary focus is to defeat the enemy while protecting its CS, CSS, and command and control facilities.
  • Must be poised to exploit every opportunity to disrupt the enemy’s timetable.
  • Conducts simultaneous operations to open opportunities for decisive action.
  • A brigade may conduct deep operations with fixed wing air, artillery interdiction, and Army combat aviation.
  • Brigade commander should create time and space necessary for its major subordinate echelons to defeat enemy forces in contact before engaging those not in contact.
  • Brigades normally fight as part of a division.
  • Separate brigades normally conduct sustained operations under corps control.
  • Normally direct engagements against enemy battalions and regiments.
  • Fights as a combined arms team.
tactical battlefield framework
Tactical Battlefield Framework
  • Area of Operations
  • Battle Space
  • Tactical Battlefield Organization
    • Deep Operations
    • Close Operations
      • Reconnaissance and Security
      • Main Effort
      • Reserves
    • Rear Operations
battlefield operating systems
Battlefield Operating Systems
  • Intelligence
  • Maneuver
  • Fire Support
  • Air Defense
  • Mobility and Survivability
  • Combat Service Support
  • Command and Control
slide14

X

X

X

X

X

FSB

Echeloned Brigade Command Posts

XX

TAC

CP

MAIN

CP

CMD

GP

REAR

CP

DS

X

CMD

GP

BSA

X

characteristics of offensive operations
Characteristics of Offensive Operations
  • Surprise
  • Concentration
  • Tempo
  • Audacity
organization of offensive battles
Organization of Offensive Battles
  • Deep Operations
  • Close Operations
  • Rear Operations
planning for offensive operations
Planning for Offensive Operations
  • The Deep Attack
  • The Main Attack and Main Effort
  • The Supporting Attack
  • The Reserve
  • Follow-and-Support Forces
  • Follow-and-Assume Forces
  • Reconnaissance and Security Forces
synchronization of offensive operations
Synchronization of Offensive Operations
  • Intelligence
  • Maneuver (Army Aviation)
  • Fire Support
  • Air Defense
  • Mobility and Survivability
  • Combat Service Support
  • Command and Control
forms of maneuver
Forms of Maneuver
  • Envelopment
  • Turning Movement
  • Infiltration
  • Penetration
  • Frontal Attack
brigade formations for offensive actions
Brigade Formations for Offensive Actions
  • Brigade in Column
  • Brigade Vee
  • Brigade on Line Without a Reserve
  • Brigade Box
  • Brigade Wedge
slide27

SECURITY FORCE

FLANK

SECURITY

FLANK

SECURITY

DS

FSB

REAR SECURITY

Note: Size, composition, and distance of

operation from main body for

advance, flank, and rear security

will vary according to the

commander’s estimate of the situation.

Brigade in Column

x

slide28

SECURITY FORCE

FLANK

SECURITY

FLANK

SECURITY

DS

FSB

REAR SECURITY

Note: Size, composition, and distance of

operation from main body for

advance, flank, and rear security

will vary according to the

commander’s estimate of the situation.

Brigade Vee

x

slide29

FSB

Brigade on Line Without a Reserve

SECURITY FORCE

FLANK

SECURITY

FLANK

SECURITY

DS

X

REAR SECURITY

Note: Size, composition, and distance of operation from main

body for advance, flank, and rear security will vary according

to the commander’s estimate of the situation.

slide30

FSB

Brigade Box

SECURITY FORCE

(-)

(-)

DS

FLANK

SECURITY

FLANK

SECURITY

X

(-)

(-)

REAR SECURITY

slide31

FSB

Brigade Wedge

SECURITY FORCE

(-)

DS

DS

FLANK

SECURITY

FLANK

SECURITY

X

(-)

(-)

(-)

REAR SECURITY

forms of tactical offense
Forms of Tactical Offense
  • Movement to Contact
  • Attack
  • Exploitation
  • Pursuit
movement to contact
Movement To Contact
  • Planning
    • Security Force
    • Advance Guard
    • Flank and Rear Security
    • Main Body
  • Preparation
  • Execution
slide34

X

X

SPT

Movement To Contact

SECURITY FORCE

(-)

MAIN

BODY

(-)

(+)

(+)

TOC

TAC

CP

FLANK

SECURITY

FLANK

SECURITY

(-)

FWD

FLD

(-)

REAR SECURITY

slide36

Separate Brigade Movement to Contact (Independent Movement)

X

X

SPT

SECURITY FORCE

ADVANCE GUARD

(-)

(-)

TAC CP

FLANK

SECURITY

TOC

FLANK

SECURITY

(-)

(-)

(-)

REAR SECURITY

attack
Attack
  • Hasty Attack
  • Deliberate Attack
  • Feint
  • Raid
  • Demonstration
hasty attack
Hasty Attack
  • Advance of Reconnaissance and Security Forces
  • Deployment of Reconnaissance and Security Forces
  • Assault by the Main Body
deliberate attack
Deliberate Attack
  • Supporting Effort
    • Mission
    • Composition
    • Employment
  • Main Effort
    • Mission
    • Composition
    • Employment
  • Actions on the Objective
  • Scheme of Maneuver
  • Continuation of the Attack
the feint
The Feint
  • Limited objective attack as a show of force intended to deceive the enemy and draw his combat power from your main attack
  • Must have sufficient strength and composition to cause the desired enemy reaction
  • Must appear real; therefore some contact with the enemy is required
the raid
The Raid
  • A small-scale tactical operation
  • Based on detailed intelligence
  • Involves swift movement into hostile territory and ends in a planned withdrawal
the demonstration
The Demonstration
  • An attack or show of force in an area where a decision is not being sought
  • Made with the intention to deceive the enemy
  • No enemy contact is to be made
  • Uses all elements of the BOS
  • Contribution of BOSs must appear real
the exploitation
The Exploitation
  • Normally follows a successful attack
  • Takes advantage of a weakened or collapsed enemy defense
  • Purpose:
    • Prevent reconstitution of enemy defenses
    • Prevent enemy withdrawal
    • Secure deep objectives
    • Destroy command and control facilities and enemy forces
  • Avoids enemy resistance when possible
the pursuit
The Pursuit
  • Normally follows a successful exploitation
  • Its function is to complete the destruction of the enemy’s main force
  • Does not avoid enemy contact
  • May advance to a physical objective
  • Ordered when the enemy can no longer maintain its position and tries to escape
  • Maintains unrelenting pressure on the enemy
fundamentals of defensive operations
Fundamentals of Defensive Operations
  • The Purpose of the Defense
  • Operations in Depth
  • Synchronization of Defensive Operations
  • Defensive Patterns
    • Area Defense
    • Mobile Defense
  • The Reserve
purpose of the defense
Purpose of the Defense
  • Purpose: Cause an enemy attack to fail
  • May involve both defensive and offensive actions
  • May be enemy or terrain focused
operations in depth
Operations In Depth
  • Deep Operations
  • Close Operations
  • Rear Operations
synchronization of defensive operations
Synchronization of Defensive Operations
  • Intelligence
  • Maneuver (Army Aviation)
  • Fire Support
  • Air Defense
  • Mobility and Survivability
  • Combat Service Support
  • Command and Control
defensive patterns
Defensive Patterns

Mobile Defense

Area Defense

area defense
Area Defense
  • Purpose: Retention of terrain or facilities for a specified time
  • Conducted as part of a division or corps defense
  • May elect to defend forward or in depth
  • May assign sectors or battle positions
  • May involve the establishment of a strongpoint
mobile defense
Mobile Defense
  • Purpose: Orients on the destruction of the attacking force by permitting the enemy to maneuver to a position of disadvantage that exposes him to a striking force.
  • Not generally conducted by a brigade, but may be
  • Employs a covering force, a fixing force, a striking force, and a reserve force
  • Assumes a high degree of risk
comparison of mobile and area defense
Mobile Defense

Orients on the enemy

Mobility greater than or equal to the enemy

Defend with minimum force

Fire and maneuver

Striking force

Striking force used at the decisive

Area Defense

Deny enemy access to designated terrain for a specific time

Mutual supporting positions and in depth

Defend with maximum force

Interlocking fires

Smaller mobile reserve for local counterattacks

Comparison of Mobile and Area Defense
the reserve
The Reserve
  • Employment of the Reserve
  • The Reserve and the Spoiling Attack
  • Reinforcing with the Reserve
retrograde operations
Retrograde Operations
  • Delay
  • Withdrawal
    • Assisted
    • Unassisted
  • Retirement
delay
Delay
  • Inflicts maximum delay and damage
  • Delaying force is not to get decisively engaged
withdrawal
Withdrawal
  • It is disengagement from the enemy
  • Conducted so the battle may be handed over to another unit positioned to the rear of the withdrawing force
  • May be either assisted or unassisted
  • Conducted in several phases
retirement
Retirement
  • Made when a force is not in contact with the enemy
  • Usually made after a withdrawal
  • Conducted to:
    • Occupy more favorable terrain
    • Conform to the disposition of another force
    • Permit the employment of the force in another sector
    • Increase the distance between the defender and the enemy
summary
Summary
  • Brigade Missions
  • Capabilities and Limitations
  • Organization and Functions
  • Battlefield Focus
  • Offensive Operations
  • Defensive Operations
  • Retrograde Operations