Www.mobilitytrade.co.uk
Download
1 / 28

mobilitytrade.co.uk - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 154 Views
  • Uploaded on

www.mobilitytrade.co.uk. A range of online living aids in conjunction with Healthcare Europe Ltd and Mobility Trade. Introductory Demographic information. Between 2006 and 2036 People aged 65-74 will increase from 5.05 million to 7.92 million

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'mobilitytrade.co.uk' - vail


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Slide1 l.jpg

www.mobilitytrade.co.uk

A range of online living aids in conjunction with Healthcare Europe Ltd and Mobility Trade


Slide2 l.jpg

Introductory Demographic information

  • Between 2006 and 2036

  • People aged 65-74 will increase from 5.05 million to 7.92 million

  • People aged 75-84 will increase from 3.42 million to 5.45 million

  • People aged 85+ will rise from 1.23 million to 3.07 million

  • This is a total increase in the older population of 70% over the next 30 years

  • The rates of disability and dependence escalate rapidly with increasing age

  • Source: care of elderly people market survey, Laing & Buisson 2006


Slide3 l.jpg

Healthcare Europe Ltd

  • Healthcare Europe the parent company formed in 2007 to provide a “one stop shop” for mobility products.

  • Providing, choice, solutions, best value, service and quality

  • Award winning product ranges

  • Advisory service

  • Suppliers to NHS Trusts, Asda-Walmart, Boots, Next, JD Williams, Halfords, Findel plc

  • Mobilitytrade.co.uk created as an affiliate site to provide funds for Charities and Governmental bodies

  • Providing products and services that offer effective solutions to the challenges face by the elderly, the disabled and those adults and children with special needs.

  • Our partners have worked closely with Healthcare Professionals in developing products for over 60 years


Slide4 l.jpg

Mobilitytrade.co.uk

  • Range of over 2500 NHS approved products

  • In partnership with trusted and long established suppliers

  • Own developed and Leading Brand products

  • Product will be shipped direct to patient / client / customer

  • UK based with dedicated UK support Helpline

  • Carefully selected products designed to promote better independence, personal comfort and safety in the home

  • Comprehensive range of daily living aids together with a wide range of stimulating elderly care games, activities and therapy products


Slide5 l.jpg

  • Capitalise on demographics of ageing population

  • Capitalise on consumers “Trading up”/ self funders

  • Providing a service to an ageing population for the mutual benefit of the Retailer and Patient

  • Creation of a unique and innovative range of products for “Easy Living”

  • Creation of an all encompassing living aids website

  • Creation of a destination “store” for Daily Living aids


Slide6 l.jpg

  • Health and Wellbeing is the basic need and motivation for a fulfilled life

  • Today: Product range is driven out of our historic and current market.

    “Products for Easy Living”

    Better independence, better comfort, better safety

  • Tomorrow: Deregulation

    Innovation – Development.

    New Interest

    New Opportunities

    “Living Life to the Full”

    Having Choice


Slide7 l.jpg


Slide8 l.jpg

Product Hierarchy fulfilled life

  • Health and Wellbeing: Home Solutions - Daily Living Aids (including kitchen, bedroom, bathroom) Furniture, Personal Care, Body Care, Medication Support, Pain Relief, Home and Personal Comfort Supplements, Healthy Living. Services: Chiropody, Opticians, Blood Pressure Monitoring, Cholesterol, Diabetes tests, Installation.

  • Security and Safety: Home Safety, Personal Safety Stand Alone Telecare, Telehealth, Wandering /Sensor

  • Social Needs and Esteem: Leisure, Entertainment, Therapy, Physical Exercise, Mental Exercise, Mobility & Access, (including Walking Aids, Wheelchairs and Scooters), Beauty/Skincare, Grooming, Games and Activities, Garden, Hobbies, and seasonal Gifts.



Slide10 l.jpg

  • Product Sales Information fulfilled life

  • Multi option Delivery Service

  • After Sales Support

  • Potential Catalogue Production

  • Speed to market

  • Spares Service

  • Access to major organisations / 3rd party suppliers


Slide11 l.jpg

  • White label web site partnership opportunity fulfilled life

  • One stop shop

  • Minimal incremental outlay

  • Best Practice application systems

  • Presentation ( Brand, Design, Layout)

  • Logic ( ecommerce functionality)

  • Data (Catalogue, Customers, Orders)


Slide12 l.jpg

  • deployment of “clone” e-commerce website to provide re-branding and tools which support the easy of differing content, promotions etc.

  • Comprehensive range direct despatched to end consumer

  • Orders and all customers contact fulfilment

  • Offer customers targeted relevant products available from stock

  • Up sell or cross sell during the purchase based on known customer preferences

  • Buy products with the minimum clicks from actual inventory

  • Invite customers back to look at associated products

  • Analyse customer preferences and purchasing patterns


Slide13 l.jpg

Areas in which products are used re-branding and tools which support the easy of differing content, promotions etc.

  • NHS, Local Authorities & Social Services

  • Professional Health and Social Care Establishments – Public & Private Sector

  • Nursing, Residential Homes & Sheltered Housing Establishments & their Residents

  • Housing & Building Industry – Public & Private Sector

  • Mobility Dealers, Pharmacies & Other Retailers

  • Private Purchasers

  • Charities

  • International Distributors & Dealers


Slide14 l.jpg

  • Further opportunities include: re-branding and tools which support the easy of differing content, promotions etc.

  • Direct sourcing operation for most popular lines if required

  • Bulk quantity of best selling lines via our in house sourcing operation based inSouthern China

  • Factories audited by major UK companies

  • Own branded product can be made available



Slide16 l.jpg


Slide17 l.jpg

Health of the nation Products

Life expectancy

Ageing

Health state

Mortality rates

Living longer in poor health

Health and well being

Income and expenditure

Related information from the Office of National Statistics


Slide18 l.jpg

  • Life expectancy at birth in the UK has reached its highest level on record for both males and females. A newborn baby boy could expect to live 77.2 years and a newborn baby girl 81.5 years if mortality rates remain the same as they were in 2005–07.Females continue to live longer than males, but the gap has been closing. Although both sexes have shown annual improvements in life expectancy at birth, over the past 25 years the gap has narrowed from 6.0 years to 4.3 years. Based on mortality rates in 1980–82, 26 per cent of newborn males would die before age 65, but this had reduced to 16 per cent based on 2005–07 rates. The equivalent figures for newborn females were 16 per cent in 1980–82 and 10 per cent in 2005–07.Life expectancy at age 65 – the number of further years someone reaching 65 in 2005–07 could expect to live – is also higher for women than for men. Based on 2005–07 mortality rates, a man aged 65 could expect to live another 17.2 years, and a woman aged 65 another 19.9 years.Within the UK, life expectancy varies by country. England has the highest life expectancy at birth, 77.5 years for males and 81.7 years for females, while Scotland has the lowest, 74.8 years for males and 79.7 years for females. Life expectancy at age 65 is also higher for England than for the other countries of the UK.

    The life expectancy figures above make no allowance for future changes in mortality. Taking into account the continued improvements in mortality assumed in the 2006-based principal population projections, life expectancy at birth for those born in 2006 is projected to be 88.1 years for males and 91.5 years for females. Similarly, life expectancy for those aged 65 in 2006 is projected to be 20.6 years for males and 23.1 years for females. It is also projected that a male born in the UK in 2006 would have a 91 per cent chance of reaching age 65, and a female a 94 per cent chance.

Life expectancy at birth, UK, from period life tables, 1980-82 to 2005-07


Slide19 l.jpg

Ageing level on record for both males and females. A newborn baby boy could expect to live 77.2 years and a newborn baby girl 81.5 years if mortality rates remain the same as they were in 2005–07.More pensioners than under-16's for first time

The percentage of the population aged under 16 has been declining since 1995 and, for the first time ever. has dropped below the percentage of the population of state pensionable age. Average growth in the population aged over state pensionable age between 1981 to 2007 was less than one per cent per year, however, between 2006 and 2007 the growth rate was nearly 2 per cent.

The population over state pensionable age has increased and this is partly due to the number of women born in the immediate post World War Two baby boom who reached state pensionable age in 2007. These women were born in 1947, the men born in the same year will reach state pensionable age in 2012.

The fastest growing age group in the population are those aged 80 years and over who currently constitute 4.5 per cent (2,749,507) of the total population. This age group has increased by over 1.1 million between 1981 and 2007 (1,572,160 to 2,749,507), from 2.8 per cent to 4.5 per cent. This is mainly a result of improvements in mortality at older ages over the second half of the 20th century.

Population: by age, United Kingdom


Slide20 l.jpg

Health Of The Nation level on record for both males and females. A newborn baby boy could expect to live 77.2 years and a newborn baby girl 81.5 years if mortality rates remain the same as they were in 2005–07.Census 2001 has released detailed results on health, disability and the provision of care, with 9.2 per cent of people in England and Wales saying their health is 'not good'.In Wales, the proportion reporting their health as 'not good' is 12.4 per cent and all local authorities in Wales have above average rates for this response. In England, the region with the highest percentage of people reporting 'not good health' is the North East (12 per cent).Among English counties, Durham is highest for 'not good health' (13.2 per cent), followed by Merseyside (12.6 per cent) and Tyne and Wear (12.3 per cent).Among local authority districts, Merthyr Tydfil record the highest rate of 'not good health' (18.1 per cent), followed by Easington (17.3 per cent). Four other areas had over 15 per cent of the population in 'not good health', all in South Wales: Blaenau Gwent (16.5 per cent), Neath Port Talbot (16.4 per cent), Rhondda Cynon Taff (15.7 per cent) and Caerphilly (15.0 per cent). Other districts with above average values for 'not good health' can be found in the North West, South Yorkshire and Derbyshire, and in coastal retirement areas. By contrast, the South East, excluding London, has the lowest proportion of people in 'not good health', just 7.1 per cent of the population. The county with the lowest proportion is Buckinghamshire (5.8 per cent). The local authority reporting the lowest prevalence of 'not good health' is Wokingham (4.6 per cent), which also has the highest number in good health, followed by Hart in North East Hampshire (4.8 per cent) and Surrey Heath (5.3 per cent). The lowest 20 per cent of local authorities for 'not good health', all with values of seven per cent or less, are mainly in the East and South East regions and Wiltshire.


Slide21 l.jpg

Living longer, more years in poor health level on record for both males and females. A newborn baby boy could expect to live 77.2 years and a newborn baby girl 81.5 years if mortality rates remain the same as they were in 2005–07.

The population of Great Britain has been living longer over the past 23 years, but the extra years have not necessarily been in good health or free from illness or disability. Life expectancy, healthy life expectancy (the expected years of life in good or fairly good health) and disability-free life expectancy (the expected years of life without a limiting illness or disability) all increased between 1981 and 2004 for both men and women, with life expectancy increasing at a faster rate than health expectancy.Life expectancy is higher for women than for men. In 2004 the life expectancy at birth of women was 81.0 years compared with 76.6 years for men. However, life expectancy for men has been increasing faster than for women. There was an increase of 5.7 years in men’s life expectancy between 1981 and 2004. The corresponding increase for women was 4.2 years. The gap in healthy life expectancy between men and women is smaller than for total life expectancy. In 2004, healthy life expectancy at birth was 68.0 years for men and 70.3 years for women, a gap of 2.3 years. The gap in disability free life expectancy between men and women is also smaller than for total life expectancy and healthy life expectancy. In 2004, disability-free life expectancy at birth was 62.3 years for men and 64.0 years for women, a gap of 1.7 years. The difference between life expectancy and health expectancy can be regarded as an estimate of the number of years a person can expect to live in poor health or with a limiting illness or disability. In 1981 the expected time men lived in poor health was 6.5 years. By 2004 this had risen to 8.6 years. However, comparing the trend since the introduction of new methodology in 2001, the time men are expected to spend in poor health decreased by 0.3 of a year by 2004. Women can expect to live longer in poor health than men. In 1981 the expected time women lived in poor health was 10.1 years, rising to 10.7 years in 2004. Since the introduction of revised methodology in 2001, the time women can expect to live in poor health increased by 0.2 of a year between 2001 and 2004.The time men can expect to live with a limiting illness or disability has also increased between 1981 and 2004: 12.8 years in 1981 rising to 14.3 years in 2004. Since 2001 though, the time men can expect to live with a limiting illness or disability reduced by 1 year. The time women can expect to live with a limiting illness or disability has also increased between 1981 and 2004: 16.0 years in 1981 rising to 17.0 years in 2004. Since 2001 though, the time women can expect to live with a limiting illness or disability fell by 0.5 of a year.


Slide22 l.jpg

Mortality rates level on record for both males and females. A newborn baby boy could expect to live 77.2 years and a newborn baby girl 81.5 years if mortality rates remain the same as they were in 2005–07.

  • The number of older people in England and Wales is increasing. This is mainly a result of decreasing levels of mortality observed for older ages since the 1950’s

  • . The mortality rate for the population aged over 75 has fallen from 137 deaths per thousand in 1911-1915, to 83 deaths per thousand in 2006-2007.

  • The mortality rate for the population aged between 65 and 74 has declined by two thirds over the same period, from 57 to 19 deaths per thousand.

  • Declining mortality rates in the first year of life and between the ages of one and 64 over the last 100 years have also contributed to the increasing numbers of older people in England and Wales today.


Slide23 l.jpg

Health Expectancy level on record for both males and females. A newborn baby boy could expect to live 77.2 years and a newborn baby girl 81.5 years if mortality rates remain the same as they were in 2005–07.Living longer, more years in poor health

Life expectancy, healthy life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy, 1981-2004


Slide24 l.jpg

Health & well being level on record for both males and females. A newborn baby boy could expect to live 77.2 years and a newborn baby girl 81.5 years if mortality rates remain the same as they were in 2005–07.More years in poor health for women

Women can expect to live longer than men, with life expectancy at birth in the UK being 75.9 years for men and 80.5 years for women in 2002. However, women are also more likely to have more years in poor health. In 2001, the expected years lived in poor health from age 65 onwards was 4.3 years for men and 5.8 years for women.The proportion of older people with a long-term illness or disability (LLTI) that restricts their daily activities increases with age. Just over a quarter of men and women aged 50-64 in Great Britain reported such a disability compared with two thirds of men and three quarters of women aged 85 and over in 2001.Many people in the older age groups still consider themselves to be in good health, even if they have a long-term illness which restricts their daily activities. In 2001, of all men and women aged 65 and over reporting a limiting long-term illness, just over 10 per cent considered themselves in ‘good health’ over the year and around 45 per cent reported being in ‘fairly good health’. The prevalence of smoking among older people has shown no change over the period 1998 to 2003 in Great Britain. In 2003, just over a quarter (26 per cent) of men aged 50-59 were current smokers compared with 23 per cent of women. The likelihood of smoking falls with age, reflecting both a ‘healthy survivor’ effect as well as patterns of smoking cessation. Over half of all smokers aged 50 and over reported wanting to give up smoking altogether.


Slide25 l.jpg

Median net financial and physical wealth: by age level on record for both males and females. A newborn baby boy could expect to live 77.2 years and a newborn baby girl 81.5 years if mortality rates remain the same as they were in 2005–07.

People accumulate wealth mainly during the course of their working lives. Older pensioners have less wealth than those around State Pension Age. Median net financial and physical wealth for those aged 60-64 was £26,000 and fell to £8,000 for those aged 80 and over in England.

Households headed by people in older age groups spend less than those in younger age groups. In 2003/04 households headed by someone aged 50-64 in the UK spent an average of £441 a week. For households headed by someone aged over 75, weekly spending was an average of £183. This reflects both decreasing household size and falling income in later ages.

Spending priorities change with age, with an increasing proportion of total spending going on food, housing and fuel. For households where the household reference person was aged in their 50s, 10 per cent of spending in 2003/04 was on food compared with 15 per cent for those 80 or over.


Slide26 l.jpg

Income, Wealth and Expenditure level on record for both males and females. A newborn baby boy could expect to live 77.2 years and a newborn baby girl 81.5 years if mortality rates remain the same as they were in 2005–07.

Over the last 8 years pensioners’ incomes in Great Britain have risen faster than average earnings. Net income rose by 28 per cent between 1995/96 and 2003/04. The increase was even sharper after deducting housing costs, rising by 38 per cent over the period. The growth in pensioner incomes over the period resulted from substantial increases in income from occupational pensions and benefits.The levels of income older people receive falls with age. The median net household income for people aged 50-59 was £353 a week in 2003/04, compared with £232 for people over 80 (after housing costs and equivalised to adjust for household size).The proportion of pensioners living on low incomes in Great Britain has fallen over the past decade, from 26 per cent in 1995/96 to 20 per cent in 2003/04. However, the proportion of working-age people on low incomes in 2003/04 was substantially lower at 14 per cent.As people get older and retire from the labour market their sources of income change. People in their 50s get most of their income from employment and self-employment (80 per cent). This falls to just 10 per cent for those in their 70s. State benefits (which include the state retirement pension) are the main source of income for pensioners. The majority of pensioners have additionally some form of private income. Pensioner couples on average have over twice as much investment and private pension income than single pensioners. Younger pensioners tend to have higher incomes than older pensioners because they are more likely to receive private pension and earnings income than older pensioners, and at a higher level. Differences in pensioners’ incomes can also be a reflection of their working lives. People with broken work records, such as women who have taken on caring responsibilities, are likely to have accrued lower levels of private or state pensions.

Pensioners’ incomes, GB


Slide27 l.jpg

The Market Is Vast And Growing … level on record for both males and females. A newborn baby boy could expect to live 77.2 years and a newborn baby girl 81.5 years if mortality rates remain the same as they were in 2005–07.

The market demand for mobility aids is going to explode.

The Financial Times reports that £80 Billion is spent on meeting mobility needs in the UK at the moment. (including NHS)

This is going to grow very quickly and to very high levels..

There’s a wide range of mobility products and services being demanded by this increasing number of older people wanting more and more to have a degree of freedom as they strive to maintain their independence.


Slide28 l.jpg

  • Contact: level on record for both males and females. A newborn baby boy could expect to live 77.2 years and a newborn baby girl 81.5 years if mortality rates remain the same as they were in 2005–07.

    • Mike Green 07831163558 mgreen@healthcare-europe.co.uk

    • Richard Maher 07817668902 rmaher@healthcare-europe.co.uk

    • info@healthcare-europe.co.uk

    • TEL: 0845 058 2320

  • Address : Healthcare Europe Ltd Victory House, The Sidings Business Park,

    Whalley, Lancashire BB7 9SE

    01254 822001

  • Co.Reg No: 6256153


  • ad