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Civil Rights Movement (1960s) Struggle to end segregation - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Civil Rights Movement (1960s) Struggle to end segregation. A Civil Rights Movement. Source: (above) Abbeyville Press http://www.abbeville.com/Products/InteriorImages/0789206560Interiors.htm. Source: (above) Florida Memory Project, http://www.floridamemory.com/. A Civil Rights Movement.

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Civil Rights Movement (1960s)

Struggle to end segregation

A Civil Rights Movement

Source: (above) Abbeyville Press http://www.abbeville.com/Products/InteriorImages/0789206560Interiors.htm

Source: (above) Florida Memory Project, http://www.floridamemory.com/

slide3

A Civil Rights Movement

  • Significant gains made by strong leaders

Sources:

(above) San Diego State University

http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~cerna/protests.htm

(right) Carl Vinson Institute of Government at University of Georgia http://www.cviog.uga.edu/Projects/gainfo/tl24frame1.htm

slide4

A Civil Rights Movement

  • Disability Rights Movement (1970s – today)
  • Struggle to end segregation

Source: (above and right) Smithsonian National Museum of American History

http://americanhistory.si.edu/disabilityrights/exhibit_menu.html

slide5

A Civil Rights Movement

  • Despite some gains by vocal activists
    • Developmental Disabilities

Assistance and Bill of Rights Act (’75)

    • Education for All Handicapped

Children Act (’75)

    • Americans with Disabilities Act (‘90)
  • Segregation still exists

Source: (above) AP Photo by Tetona Dunlap http://www.pww.org/article/articleprint/9620/

slide6

History

  • The Middle Ages
    • “idiot cages”
    • “ships of fools”
  • The Protestant Reformation
    • subhuman organisms
    • “filled with Satan”
slide7

History

  • The 19th and 20th Centuries
    • Growth of institutions for disabled
    • Training schools  asylums
    • Pupils  inmates

Source: The Minnesota Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities, www.mncdd.org, www.museumofdisability.org

slide8

Inclusion

  • The time to end segregation is NOW.
  • All people deserve to be valued as contributing community members.

NOW is the time for inclusion.

slide9

Inclusion

What is inclusion?

  • “Inclusion” means all individuals – with and without disabilities – live, learn, work, play and participate together in all life experiences.
  • Supports are provided to meet individual needs, and everyone is accepted and regarded as a valued member of society.
slide10

Inclusion

Three Key Spheres of Inclusion:

Education

Business

Community

slide11

Inclusion in Education

Barriers:

  • Denial of access to

mainstream education

  • Lack of access to fair

curriculum

  • Shortage of opportunities for higher education
  • Untrained and uninformed instructors

(above) West Hernando Middle School, Brooksville

slide12

Inclusion in Education

Inclusion NOW:

  • More inclusive classrooms
  • Modifications to regular

curriculum

    • e.g., State Reading Initiatives
  • Higher education  better job opportunities
  • Diverse classrooms
  • All teachers qualified to teach all students

(above) Joseph Benito, student in an inclusive classroom

slide13

Inclusion in Business

Barriers:

  • Lack of job opportunities
  • Health benefits cut
  • Insufficient transportation
  • Untrained and uninformed employers
slide14

Inclusion in Business

Inclusion NOW:

  • Untapped resources
  • Reliable health benefits
  • Transportation options
  • Highly dedicated and professional employees
  • Tax incentives and a diverse workplace

(above) Juan “Papo” Pollo, owner of “Pop’s Vending”

slide15

Inclusion in the Community

Barriers:

  • Lack of access to affordable housing
  • Insufficient transportation
  • Need for expansion and equality in necessary waiver programs
  • Untrained and uninformed citizens and leaders
slide16

Inclusion in the Community

Inclusion NOW:

  • Opportunities for rental or

home ownership

  • Transportation options
  • Sufficient access and

availability of needed services and support

  • All benefit in inclusive communities
  • Inclusive communities = strong communities

(above) Jonathan Hughes, homeowner

slide17

Inclusion NOW!

A Civil Rights Movement

  • Equal rights for all
  • Right to experience life as equal and active members of society

NOW is the time to break down barriers.

slide18

Getting Involved

Where can I learn more?

  • The National Inclusion Network

www.inclusion.org

  • The Florida Developmental Disabilities Council

www.fddc.org

Photo

slide19

Take Action…NOW!

  • Start the dialog.
  • Contact your local legislator.
    • www.flsenate.gov
    • www.myfloridahouse.gov
    • Call 1-800-342-1827
  • Become an advocate.

This PowerPoint Presentation is the property, intellectual and otherwise, of the Florida Developmental Disabilities Council,

Inc., and distributed for the purpose of educating the public about the need for “Inclusion NOW!” It is forbidden to change or

alter this presentation in any way without the expressed consent of the Florida Developmental Disabilities Council, Inc. For

more details, or to obtain clarification, please contact the Council toll-free at 800-580-7801.