Power Supply Introduction - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Power Supply Introduction

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  1. Power Supply Introduction • How Did This Workshop Come About? Who Are We? • Today’s Goals and Agenda • Ground Rules

  2. Background Several things all happened at once: • Research done by Lawrence Berkeley Lab (LBL) on standby power usage. • CA “energy crisis” in 2001 – folks looking for new energy-saving opportunities. • NRDC, a national environmental advocacy group, retained Ecos Consulting to look at active mode efficiency and power supplies in general

  3. What We Found • Around 400 million new power supplies (internal and external) sold/yr in U.S. • Efficiency of these devices all over the map. In general, external models have very low efficiencies. • Power supply designs impact both standby and active mode energy use. • More efficient power supplies could eliminate more than 10 large power plants; save billions in electricity bills.

  4. External Cell and cordless phones Computer printers Cordless tools Laptop computers Cordless tootbrushes Computer games (e.g., Playstation) Internal Computers Monitors Stereo components Office copiers Appliances These things are everywhere!

  5. More Questions Than Answers • How does this market really work? Who makes the decisions? • What is the cost increment for a more energy-efficient power supply? • Do the different parts of the food chain realize this opportunity? Talk to each other? • How can we move the players to make/spec. better power supplies? What are the non-energy benefits (smaller, lighter, less heat build-up, etc.)

  6. The Food Chain

  7. So… Have a workshop. Bring everyone together. Start the dialogue.

  8. Hosts • EPA Energy Star – Voluntary labeling program that identifies more energy-efficient products. • DOE/FEMP – Interested in energy conservation; responsible for implementing Federal Executive Order; FEMP – federal purchasing.

  9. More Hosts • NRDC – Views energy efficiency as cost-effective tool to reduce power plant emissions and improve air quality. Works on both voluntary and regulatory solutions. • PG&E – Local utility leader in energy efficiency. (In CA $225 million/yr for energy efficiency. Similar pools of money in NW and NE.) • LBL – National DOE Laboratory; Experts on standby power.

  10. The Tool Box • Consensus Test Methods • Energy Star Labeling • Purchasing Specifications • Targeted Education • Utility Incentives – Buy down incremental costs • Mandatory Standards – State or Federal

  11. Today’s Meeting • Information sharing. • Networking. • Identify next steps: • Additional research? • New test methods? • Revised specifications? • Future meetings – by sector? Etc.

  12. Ground Rules • Anti-Trust Considerations – Avoid talking about price setting, restricting markets, etc. • Seek out voluntary, collaborative approaches. • Be open-minded and creative. • Try not to get too-techie; watch acronyms/industry jargon

  13. Today’s Line-up • Standby power primer – LBL • Active mode and power supply research findings – Ecos • Panels: • The buyers – what are they looking for? • Technical discussion – efficiency options • Success stories – how did they do it and why?

  14. Line-Up Continued • Breakout Session by Sector • Policy Overview – U.S. and International • Next Steps • Tie-Breaker – Super Bowl Poll