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The PEEL Cheeseburger Model!. The top bun is your POINT, what you see first . e.g. Vaccines can be of benefit as they prevent epidemics. The Cheese is the EVIDENCE which goes on top the meat .

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The PEEL Cheeseburger Model!


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    1. The PEEL Cheeseburger Model! The top bun is your POINT, what you see first. e.g. Vaccines can be of benefit as they prevent epidemics. The Cheese is the EVIDENCE which goes on top the meat. e.g. For example, the number of cases of Measles decreased since the introduction of the MMR vaccine. The burger is the EXPLANATION that provides the meat of the structure. e.g. The MMR vaccine was introduced in the UK in 1968. As the proportion of children vaccinated increased, the number of reported cases of measles gradually fell. From the end of the 1960 ‘s to the mid 1980’s cases went from half a million to fewer than 100,000 and death rates per year fell by 87%. [1] The bottom bun LINKS it all together. e.g. This evidence suggests that vaccinations are of benefit as they prevented a significant number of people getting measles as well as decreasing the chances of dying of measles. You could also have a double cheeseburger with double the evidence and explanations in the same bun! Reference [1]http://www.mrc.ac.uk/Achievementsimpact/Storiesofimpact/Measles/index.htm 28/1/2013

    2. The PEEL Triple C burger! Compare, contrast and conclude. The top bun is your POINT, what you see first. e.g. Vaccines can be of benefit as they prevent epidemics. The first layer of Cheese is the EVIDENCE which supports your point. e.g. For example, the number of cases of Measles decreased since the introduction of the MMR vaccine. The first burger is the EXPLANATION that provides the support for your point, the meat of the structure. e.g. The MMR vaccine was introduced in the UK in 1968. As the proportion of children vaccinated increased, the number of reported cases of measles gradually fell. From the end of the 1960 ‘s to the mid 1980’s cases went from half a million to fewer than 100,000 and death rates per year fell by 87%. [1] The second layer of Cheese is the EVIDENCE which contradicts your point. e.g. However, some vaccine programs have lead to an increase in epidemics such as the shingles epidemic in the US. The second burger is the EXPLANATION that provides the support for your contradiction, the meat of the structure. e.g. In 1995 a live virus chickenpox vaccine was licenced in the US. In the 15 years since its introduction the effectiveness of the vaccine has dropped from 70-90% chance of preventing disease whereas this has now dropped to 44%. However, the vaccine has prevented the natural immunity which protects against shingles, which is a far more serious and life threatening disease, leading to an increase of shingles cases in the US. [2] The bottom bun LINKS it all together. e.g. This evidence suggests that vaccinations are of benefit as they prevented a significant number of people getting measles as well as decreasing the chances of dying of measles. However, not all vaccines are beneficial in the long term. Reference [1]http://www.mrc.ac.uk/Achievementsimpact/Storiesofimpact/Measles/index.htm 28/1/2013 [2] http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/11/02/chicken-pox-vaccine-creates-shingles-epidemic.aspx 4/6/2013

    3. The PEEEL Double Decker Bacon Cheeseburger! Evaluating paragraph The top bun is your POINT, what you see first. e.g. Vaccines can be of benefit as they prevent epidemics. The first layer of Cheese is the first piece of EVIDENCE which supports your point. e.g. For example, the number of cases of Measles decreased since the introduction of the MMR vaccine. The first burger is the EXPLANATION that provides the support for your point, the meat of the structure. e.g. The MMR vaccine was introduced in the UK in 1968. As the proportion of children vaccinated increased, the number of reported cases of measles gradually fell. From the end of the 1960 ‘s to the mid 1980’s cases went from half a million to fewer than 100,000 and death rates per year fell by 87%. [1] The first layer of bacon is the EVALUATION of your evidence that supports your point. e.g. This evidence suggests that the vaccination against measles actually decreased the number of people infected and therefore increasing herd immunity, leading to a reduced chance of an epidemic occurring. The sources validity is high as this has come from the medical research council and is based on medical data that has been peer reviewed. The second layer of Cheese is the second piece of EVIDENCE which supports your point. e.g. Similar evidence is indicated in reference to the whooping cough vaccine as when the number of children in the US having the vaccine decreased the number of cases of whooping cough dramatically increased. The second burger is the EXPLANATION that provides the supports your second point. e.g. Prior to immunisations for whooping cough there were up to 9,000 related deaths whereas through the period of 2000 to 2008 only 181 people died and of these 166 of these where less than six months old. However due to the widespread concerns, immunisations fell in the UK during the 1970’s which led to a massive epidemic in 1979 resulting in 13,000 cases and 41 deaths.[2] The second layer of bacon is the EVALUATION of your evidence that supports your point. e.g. This evidence suggests that the vaccinations have played a significant part in preventing epidemics and also shows that when immunisation drops this leads to an increased risk of epidemics. The sources validity is also high as this has come from the centre for disease control and is based on medical data that has been collected over several years. The bottom bun LINKS it all together. e.g. This evidence suggests that vaccinations are of benefit as they prevented a significant number of people getting diseases, developing herd immunity and also when intake decreases the chances of epidemics increases. Reference [1]http://www.mrc.ac.uk/Achievementsimpact/Storiesofimpact/Measles/index.htm 28/1/2013 [2]http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/whatifstop.htm 5/6/2013