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How State, Local Communities and Universities Work Together To Implement Evidenced Based Practices and Reduce Recidivism PowerPoint Presentation
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WORKING TOGETHER TO GET IT RIGHT. How State, Local Communities and Universities Work Together To Implement Evidenced Based Practices and Reduce Recidivism of Juvenile Offenders . Eric Shafer – Assistant Court Administrator – Montgomery County Juvenile Court

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

WORKING TOGETHER TO GET IT RIGHT

How State, Local Communities and Universities Work Together To Implement Evidenced Based Practices and Reduce Recidivism of Juvenile Offenders

Eric Shafer – Assistant Court Administrator – Montgomery County Juvenile Court

Barbara Keen-Marsh, MSW, LISW-S, LICDC - South Community, Inc.

Jeff M. Kretschmar, Ph.D. - Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education, Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Case Western Reserve University

montgomery county juvenile court dayton ohio
Montgomery County Juvenile Court Dayton, Ohio

-Began in 2005 with 6 Counties

-Required the introduction of Evidenced

Based Practices

-Funding through:

Ohio Dept. of Mental Health

Ohio Dept. of Youth Services

  • Ohio’s Behavioral Health Juvenile Justice Initiative (BHJJ)
montgomery county juvenile court dayton ohio1
Montgomery County Juvenile Court Dayton, Ohio

Learning Independence and Family Empowerment LIFE Program

Functional Family Therapy (FFT)

multiple pathways to south community inc function family therapy
Multiple Pathways to South Community Inc. – Function Family Therapy
  • Ohio Department of Youth Services
    • Parole
  • Nicholas Residential Treatment Center
    • 24 bed facility for boys 12-18
    • Open Setting
  • Juvenile Cognitive Alternative Rehabilitation Effort
    • 18 bed program for boys housed within the Detention Center
    • 90 Day Stay
    • Aggression Replacement Training (ART)
multiple pathways to south community inc function family therapy1
Multiple Pathways to South Community Inc. – Function Family Therapy
  • The Center for Adolescent Services
    • Community Correctional Facility
    • 44 bed facility, 34 for boys, 10 for girls
  • MCJC Probation
    • 950 youth on Probation
    • 4 Dedicated Probation Officers
  • MCJC Intervention Center (Diversion)
    • 24/7 Reception and Assessment Center
    • 2,900 cases diverted annually
    • Disproportionate Minority Contact Mediation Program
montgomery county juvenile court dayton ohio2
Montgomery County Juvenile Court Dayton, Ohio
  • Keys to Success
    • Early Involvement
      • Make a connection on day one
    • Opening our facilities and providing space
      • Become true partners with providers
    • Constant Collaboration
      • Line Staff
      • Administrative staff
slide7

LIFE Program

Learning Independence and Family Empowerment

Local Partnership

South Community, Inc.

Montgomery County Juvenile Court and Reclaiming Futures

ADAMHS Board of Montgomery County

SBHI/Crisis Care

slide8

LIFE Program

Learning Independence and Family Empowerment

State and Federal Partners

referral structure
REFERRAL STRUCTURE

Youth is Released from ODYS, JCARE, Nicholas or CAS

Youth Enters Into the Juvenile Court System

Crisis Care Completes an Assessment

LIFE Program is Recommended

Parole, Probation Officer or Other Court Personnel Refer Family to Services

life program structure
LIFE PROGRAM STRUCTURE

Therapist Contacts Family Within 48 Hours of Referral

  • Services Provided:
  • Home Based Family Therapy
  • Psychiatric Services
  • Intensive Probation
  • Case Management
  • Other Collaboration:
  • Family
  • Probation/parole Officer
  • Intervention Center
  • Natural Helper
  • Child Welfare
  • Other Systems
  • Case Western University
  • Functional Family Therapy, Inc.
slide11

Why FFT?

  • Blueprints Model – Evidenced Based Practice
  • Well Documented
  • Highly Successful Family Intervention Program for Juvenile Offenders

Strength-based

  • Consistent with local and state initiatives
  • Focus on strengths and assists families to recovery
slide12

Goals:

  • Significant and Long-Term Reduction in Youth Re-Offending and Violent Behavior
  • Low Drop-Out and High Completion Rates
  • Positive Impacts On Family Conflict, Family Communication, Parenting, and Youth Problem Behavior
  • Significant Reduction in Sibling Entry into High-Risk Behaviors,
slide15

Macro Level

Key Concepts

  • Top Down Cooperation and Collaboration
  • Ongoing Problem Solving
    • Attention to Customer Service—the other agencies are Our Customers too!!
  • Ongoing Needs Assessment
  • Planning for Sustainability from Day 1 and adjusting Sustainability Plan as Program Grows
    • Current Challenge is Ohio’s move to an IHBT Rate
service with a smile
Service with a Smile
  • Weekly meetings with Probation officers to maximize collaboration and keep everyone on the same page
  • Including Probation Officers and Administration in FFT Trainings
  • Problem Solve any interruption in the flow of referrals– eliminate barriers and SELL SELL SELL to all links in the referral chain---Judges, Magistrates, Traditional Probation Officers, Mental Health Assessors in and out of our agency.
  • Key Attitude is how can we make Our Process fit Your Process and Your Needs
marketing matching
Marketing = Matching
  • A site is Selling Two Things
    • Service (Micro Level)
    • Results (Macro Level)
  • You have to do both in ways that MATCH a particular customer
demographics
Demographics
  • From 2006 through June 2013, 2,545 youth enrolled
    • average age at intake 15.6 years
    • 58.4% male
    • 52.3% Caucasian
  • From July 2011 – June 2013
    • 67.4% male
    • 42.9% Caucasian
youth characteristics
Youth Characteristics

*p = .05, ** p < .01, *** p < .001

youth characteristics1
Youth Characteristics

*p = .05, ** p < .01, *** p < .001

oyas risk
OYAS Risk
  • Ohio Youth Assessment System (OYAS)
    • Criminogenic risk tool designed to assist juvenile court staff with placement and treatment decisions
    • Helps identify likelihood to re-offend
dsm axis i diagnoses
DSM Axis I Diagnoses

*p < .05, ** p < .01, *** p < .001

trauma
Trauma

* all comparisons significant at the p < .01 level; effect sizes between .30 - .60.

substance use self reported previous 6 month substance use from intake to termination for females
Substance UseSelf-Reported Previous 6 Month Substance Use from Intake to Termination for Females
termination information1
Termination Information
  • 2,019 youth terminated from BHJJ services (918 from Montgomery)
  • ALOS = 209 days (147 days in Montgomery)
    • 224 days successful completers
    • 180 days for unsuccessful completers
  • ALOS from July 2011 – June 2013 = 163 days (131 days in Montgomery)
    • 174 days for successful completers
    • 135 days for unsuccessful completers
  • At intake, 47.9% of youth were identified as at risk for out of home placement
  • At termination, 24.0% of youth were identified as at risk for out of home placement
    • 7.3% of successful completers
    • 56.7% of unsuccessful completers
recidivism
Recidivism
  • At termination, police contacts for 68% of youth had been reduced
    • Police contacts for 24% of youth remained the same
  • One year after termination, 10% of successful completers and 19% of unsuccessful completers had new felony charges
  • Eighty-nine (89) youth (3.5%) enrolled in BHJJ for whom we had recidivism data were sent to an ODYS facility at any time following their enrollment in BHJJ, including after a youth’s termination from BHJJ.
    • 24/1040 (2.3%) in Montgomery County
financial considerations
Financial Considerations
  • Using only the direct State contribution to BHJJ of $8.4 million from 2006 - 2011, the average cost per youth enrolled in BHJJ was $4778. The FY11 per diem to house a youth at an ODYS institution was $442 and the average length of stay was 12.6 months. Based on these numbers, the estimated cost of housing the average youth at an ODYS facility in FY11 was $167,960.
contact information
Contact Information

Eric Shafer

Montgomery County Juvenile Court

937-225-4164

eshafer@mcjcohio.org

Jeff Kretschmar

Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education

Case Western Reserve University

216-368-2305

jeff.kretschmar@case.edu

Barbara Keen-Marsh

South Community, Inc.

937-534-1325

bmarsh@southcommunity.com