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SAISD School Configurations. March 2003 Board Presentation San Antonio ISD . Purpose.

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saisd school configurations

SAISD School Configurations

March 2003

Board Presentation

San Antonio ISD

purpose
Purpose
  • The purpose of our report is to inform the Board about the District’s planning for the future as we strive to attain our District’s mission; to solicit policy decision-making input; and to strengthen the vision of the SAISD Leadership Team (Board, Superintendent, and Administrative Staff).
  • The mission of the San Antonio Independent School District is to graduate all students as responsible citizens with the academic and social preparation to pursue higher education, join the military, or enter the work force.
where are we in our planning efforts
Where are we in our planning efforts?
  • Examining alignment of forward movement in the light of our fundamental beliefs:
  • We believe that excellence and equity in student performance are achievable for all students.
  • We are committed to the premise that no child will be left behind.
  • For these reasons, we must look for ways to alleviate our conditions of performance.
  • We believe that the teacher is the program.
  • We are extremely proud of our teaching and administrative staff. We see our current problem as a “systems” issue, not a “people issue.”
  • We believe people support what they help create.
  • We believe that change comes from within.
  • At this point we are communicating these issues across our organization.
where do we want to be
Where do we want to be?
  • Remove barriers of school organization that prevent the attainment of our mission
  • Re-examine our organizational design
  • Graduate all students as responsible citizens with the academic and social preparation to pursue higher education, join the military, or enter the work force.
examination of research
Examination of Research
  • In a number of published studies comparingK – 8 to junior high schools in Milwaukee and New York City, K – 8 schools outperform junior high schools in almost every category assessed. Studies show K – 8 schools promote higher self-esteem, less victimization by other students, greater levels of participation in extracurricular activities, and healthy adolescent development.
  • Improved safety – older siblings attend with younger children, often taking on the part of protector, tutor and role model. The same children must posture a reputation, which often leads to the disruption associated with large middle schools.
  • Increased parental involvement – parents are connected longer and often have more than one family member enrolled at the same time.
examination of research6
Examination of Research
  • According to Policy Research Report Number 12 issued by the Texas Education Agency in January 1999, school size had a major effect on the 2,978 Texas schools studied. Larger schools note a decline in performance, attendance rates, and an increase in retention rates.
  • In smaller schools the alignment of curriculum from grade to grade is facilitated by the closeness of the campus.
saisd in district charters currently moving forward with expanded grade spans
SAISD In-District Charters Currently Moving Forward with Expanded Grade Spans
  • In the spring of 2002, Hawthorne ES was approved as an In-District PK-8 charter. This year 6th grade was added and we will add 7th grade next year.
  • Austin ES was approved as an In-District PK-6 charter in the fall of 2002 and add their 6th grade next year.
saisd conditions of performance middle school focus
SAISD Conditions of PerformanceMiddle School Focus
  • Academic performance
  • Truancy
  • Decline in attendance
  • Increased discipline referrals at middle school
  • Gang activity
  • Pregnancy drug and substance abuse
  • Disrespect for authority
  • Bullying/Victimization
  • Decline in parent involvement
2002 taas reading performance by at risk status
2002 TAAS Reading Performance By At-Risk Status
  • The SAISD student population includes 57% of all students who are “at-risk,” and this group shows a disproportionate decline in performance at the middle school level.
  • Research on Pre-K - 8 schools shows that disadvantaged students profit most from small settings.

2002 SAISD TAAS Reading PerformanceBy Student At-Risk Status

2002 taas reading performance for limited english proficiency lep students
2002 TAAS Reading Performance for Limited English Proficiency (LEP) Students
  • LEP students are not successfully transitioning to Middle School. SAISD English TAAS 2002 Reading test scores drop dramatically from 5th to 6th grade.
    • 65.1% of Middle School and 56% of High School LEP students have been LEP for 5+ years.

Pre-K - 8 schools allow students to be followed closely across grades to ease the transition to grade 6 classes.

2002 SAISD TAAS Reading PerformanceBy Student LEP Status And Grade Level

projected 2003 saisd taks performance

-11 -8 -3 -10 -11 -8 -8 -8 -8

Projected 2003 SAISD TAKS Performance
  • As we move to a new statewide testing system, middle school students’ projected math scores drop radically. Changes in this area go beyond “level of difficulty” to a much greater emphasis on higher math skills.

Projected 2003 SAISD TAKS scores in Math based on current TAAS variance from state field test results

saisd 2001 02 retention rates by grade level
SAISD 2001-02 Retention Rates by Grade Level
  • SAISD Middle School students are not successfully transitioning to High School.
    • Retention rates more than quadruple from Eighth to Ninth grades.

2001-02 SAISD Retention Rates by Grade Level

truancy final warning notices served
Truancy Final Warning Notices Served
  • The number of final warning notices, prior to referral to court, served dramatically increases at the Middle School level.
  • With smaller grade level enrollment, teachers and staff will be able to work more intensely with families on attendance issues. Students who feel they “belong” are less likely to be absent.

2001- 02 SAISD Warning Notices Served by Grade Level

1st and last quarter adm ada for 1997 98 to 2001 02
1st and Last Quarter ADM & ADA for 1997-98 to 2001-02
  • Middle School Average Daily Membership and Attendance consistently declines.
  • Attendance rates at smaller schools are higher.

Elementary

Middle

High

loss of students
Loss of Students
  • On the October PEIMS snapshot date in the 2000 – 2001 school year, a total of 2,135 students in the SAISD attendance area attended 21 out-of-district charter schools. Others attended parochial schools.
  • Eleven of these charter schools served students from PreK or K to grade 12. Five more of these schools served the continuum to grade 5,6,8, or 9. A number of local parochial schools serve students across an extended grade span.
2002 03 saisd daep placements and expulsions
2002- 03 SAISD DAEP Placements and Expulsions
  • Currently, Middle Schools mark the point at which serious disciplinary issues begin, and ninth grade statistics indicate that a number of students do not successfully make the transition to our high schools.
    • Disciplinary offenses resulting in DAEP placement and/or expulsion is rare prior to grade 6.

2002- 03 SAISD DAEP Placements and Expulsions

future academic challenges for middle school
Future Academic Challenges for Middle School
  • As Texas transitions to a new assessment measure there will be an even greater need for grade to grade alignment.
  • Current grade 3 students must pass the TAKS reading test to move to grade 4 . This same group of students, in 2005, must pass both TAKS reading and math to go from grade 5 to 6. In 2008, as 8th graders, these students will need to pass TAKS to enter grade 9.
  • High School assessments have changed with TAKS. Instead of separate reading and writing tests, students are now tested on these elements together. Students will be expected to pass assessments in science and social studies.
  • The Pre-K through Grade 8 schools will have increased opportunities for grade to grade alignment, and grade level numbers will increase the opportunity to meet individual student needs.
middle school social conditions
Middle School Social Conditions
  • SAISD Middle School students face a myriad of serious social problems which call for intense individual student support.
  • Homelessness
    • The District has identified approximately 139 homeless Middle School students, not including those students at Non-Traditional campuses, compared to approximately 83 students at High Schools.
      • Based on the Student Residency Questionnaires used by 9 Middle Schools, there is a strong possibility that 103 additional students could be homeless.
  • Serious Emotional Distress
    • Nationally, from 1980-1997, the rate of suicide among persons aged 15-19 years increased by 11% and among persons aged 10-14 years by 109%.
      • SAISD mirrors the trend at the national level.

We believe the nurturing and supportive environment of Pre-K through 8 schools will provide better emotional and physical support for students.

what does a pre k 8 school offer to students
What Does a Pre-K – 8 School Offer to Students?
  • Provides individual attention and a close knit, family atmosphere.
  • Older and younger siblings will attend school together.
  • Younger sibling feels safer knowing that older siblings are near by.
  • Numbers, often as small as 40 to 60 students in a grade level, will allow students to be known personally by all staff.
  • Student and parents will know the school and support staff well, thus increasing parental involvement.
  • Opportunities for smaller groups at middle grades to “step up” to positive leadership roles to benefit younger children.
  • Increased chance for older student to mentor or tutor younger students
  • Greater access to extra-curricular activities in a less competitive environment.
  • Access to other co-curricular activities such as Fine Arts.
  • Opportunities to participate in bilingual literacy and single gender classes.
  • Access to a nurturing and supportive environment which help students to make a smooth transition to high school.
where are we in our planning efforts20
Where are we in our planning efforts?
  • Examining alignment of forward movement in the light of our fundamental beliefs:
  • We believe that excellence and equity in student performance are achievable for all students.
  • We are committed to the premise that no child will be left behind.
  • For these reasons, we must look for ways to alleviate our conditions of performance.
  • We believe that the teacher is the program.
  • We are extremely proud of our teaching and administrative staff. We see our current problem as a “systems” issue, not a “people issue.”
  • We believe people support what they help create.
  • We believe that change comes from within.
  • At this point we are communicating these issues across our organization.
project chronology
Project Chronology

Nov. 15, 2002

Initial Discussion In Supt. Cabinet

Dec.16, 2002

Initial Presentation To Cabinet

Jan. 30, 2003

Initial Presentation To DLT

Feb. 13, 2003

Initial Presentation To Futures Committee

Feb. 20, 2003

Presentation to Consultation Committee

Feb. 24, 2003

Discussion with SAISD Dept. Heads

Feb. 24, 2003

Discussion With Principals, Curric. & Instruction, Human Resources, and Athletics

Feb. 27, 2003

Follow-up Meeting with SAISD Dept. Heads

March 3, 2003

Meeting with Longfellow & Mann Cluster Principals and Meeting with King Cluster Principals

March 4, 2003

Meeting with Harris & Lowell Middle School Principals

March 5, 2003

Presentation at Monthly Principals’ Meeting

March 6, 2003

Principals Begin Presentations To Faculties Follow-up Meeting with AFT to discuss PK-8 Initiative

March 10, 2003

Presentation to the Express News Editorial Board

Presentation of an up-dated report to the SAISD Board of Trustees

March 11, 2003

Presentation of an up-dated report to the DLT

March 24, 2003

Presentation to ALT and Advisory Committees

March 10-14, 2003

Cluster Principals Make Presentations To Faculties

March 10-28, 2003

Cluster Principals Make Presentations To Parents and Communities

March 10-April 24, 2003

SAISD Departments Conduct Comprehensive Needs Assessments on Cluster Campuses: Bond Construction, Plant Services, Human Resources, Technology and Library Services, & Food Services

March 25, 2003

Presentation To City Council of PTA’s

March 27, 2003

Follow-up Presentation to Professional Consultation Group

March 28, 2003

Presentation to Classified and Paraprofessional Consultation Meeting

April 14, 2003

Presentation to SAISD Board of Trustees of PK-8 Campuses for 2003-2004 School Year