effective assessment for learning n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Effective assessment for learning PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Effective assessment for learning

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 35

Effective assessment for learning - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 204 Views
  • Uploaded on

Effective assessment for learning . Sara Gmitrowicz Harrison Primary School George Knights Court Moor Secondary School 18 th July 2011. Key principles. Aim: Improvement of Learning Embedded in teaching and learning Shared learning goals Active involvement – pupils informed

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Effective assessment for learning


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. Effective assessment for learning Sara Gmitrowicz Harrison Primary School George Knights Court Moor Secondary School 18th July 2011

    2. Key principles Aim: Improvement of Learning • Embedded in teaching and learning • Shared learning goals • Active involvement – pupils informed • Self and peer assessment • Effective feedback • Belief that all can improve • Motivation and self esteem • Involves both teacher and learner

    3. Dialogue • Questioning • Discussion • Dialogue

    4. Mindsets • Fixed or Growth?

    5. Learning at your school… Development of growth learning culture

    6. Importance of language • What do teachers say? • What do they really mean? • How do children interpret what they say?

    7. Shirley Clarke and AfL

    8. Success Criteria and Models of Excellence

    9. You have one minute to draw a house.

    10. Talk Partners • What is successful about your partner’s drawing? • What could be done to improve your drawing?

    11. Mark your partner’s work • Door ramp for wheelchair access 30 • Disabled parking space by gate 20 • All rooms on ground floor 10 • Shrubs and flowers in garden 10 • Intercom on door 20 • Flat path leading to garden shed 10

    12. Excellence model

    13. How do we currently use success criteria? The ingredients of learning objectives ‘Any learner needs to know what they are learning to do and what they will be judged on.’ Gilbert (2010) Not ‘Guess what is inside the teacher’s head but informed learning.’ Tools for equipping learners to self- and peer-assess.

    14. First Principles • Linked with key skills for knowledge • Known by teachers first • Same for all – differentiation by supported activity • Generated by pupils • Constantly referred to • Used for peer and self assessment • Broken down into further criteria

    15. Pupil generated success criteria

    16. Possible lesson pathway

    17. ‘It’s bright”‘The Christmas trees are nice’‘The letters are a bit funny sometimes’

    18. ‘The reindeer is nice.’‘Yellow drawings don’t stand out.’

    19. ‘This is the easiest to read.’

    20. Success Criteria generated by pupils make all your letters the same size use dark colours don’t use yellow put pictures round the edge, not in the middle check that you have copied all words & numbers

    21. Year 2 Great Fire of London

    22. Model of Excellence London, in the Year of 1666. It was the middle of the summer and not a single drop of rain had fallen from the warm sky. At Pudding Lane in a small baker’s factory, an exhausted baker called Thomas Farynor, totally forgot to put his oven out and little sparks began to jump out of the hearth. Nobody noticed, they just kept on snoozing in their cosy beds on the hottest, driest night of the year. Flames started to grow, naughty sparks joined them and the hungry fire grew and grew and spread very quickly through streets, eating its way from house to house until it was out of control.

    23. Generation of success criteria with pupils • Interesting start to hook reader in • Retell events in order • Factual information • Descriptive detail to engage reader • Include specific names • Past tense • Time connectives • Sentence starts • Non negotiables

    24. Seashore Collages – Year 2

    25. Possible ways to develop pupil generated success criteria • Prove it/doing it wrong • A finished product • Comparison of two products • Sloppy success criteria • Teacher demonstration • Retrospective generating • Revisiting success criteria

    26. Generating success criteria • Stop and display a randomly selected child’s work. • Apply S.C. to suggest improvements • Then all apply to own work so far.

    27. the same for all -- differentiation by supported activity • linked with key skills for knowledge • known by teachers first • generated by pupils • constantly referred to • used for self and peer assessment • broken down into further criteria For maximum impact, success criteria need to be:

    28. George Knights Court Moor Secondary School

    29. Experimental Model • Students experience genuine uncertainty • Students need to do the task to find out the answer • Choose a skill to develop, e.g: • e.g What makes a good........Evaluation? • e.g What makes a good........Conclusion? • e.g What makes a good........Football Pass? • e.g What makes a good........Web blog? • e.g What makes a good........Sentence? • e.g What makes a good........Evaluation? • Students carry out a series of tasks • Design a class set of success criteria

    30. Examples of skill posters

    31. Peer assess to create checklist

    32. How do the students benefit? • Students can achieve. • Appreciation that learning requires the applications of specific skills. • An understanidn that there are various skills that have progression and need practising. • Used as AfL to know how to improve • Real time improvements to work

    33. Evaluation Monitor

    34. Success Criteria and Maths A tool that is particularly useful for written methods of calculation Remember to….. (skill/method) Choose/decide whether (strategy/sequence) AT1 process/problem solving