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  1. ANNOTATIONS B. Schmidt Augusta State University Economics

  2. Annotations Annotations are brief informative summaries Descriptive Annotations Critical Annotations

  3. Begin with the complete bibliographic entry • A specific format is not necessary for this course  • Include all of the following: • Authority and qualifications of the author, unless extremely well known • Scope and main purpose of text. Do not try to summarize the whole work. e.g. "Discusses the positive impact of ….." • Any bias that you note. • Reflective Summary comment. This is only place for your opinion. • Do not repeat the words of the title, give the same information in different phrasing • Be concise. Annotation Elements

  4. London, Herbert. "Five Myths of the Television Age." Television Quarterly 10(1) Spring 1982:81-89. The author explains how television contradicts five ideas commonly believed by most people, using specific examples seen on television, such as the assassination of John Kennedy, to demonstrate his points. His examples contradict such truisms as "seeing is believing", "a picture is worth a thousand words", and "satisfaction is its own reward." London uses logical arguments to support his ideas, and doesn't refer to any previous works on the topic: the article is his personal opinion. Descriptive Annotation Taken from Myrin Virtual Library

  5. London, Herbert. "Five Myths of the Television Age." Television Quarterly 10(1) Spring 1982:81-89. Herbert London, a Dean at New York University and author of several books and articles, explains how television contradicts five ideas commonly believed by most people, using specific examples seen on television, such as the assassination of John Kennedy, to demonstrate his points. His examples contradict such truisms as "seeing is believing", "a picture is worth a thousand words", and "satisfaction is its own reward." London uses logical arguments to support his ideas, and doesn't refer to any previous works on the topic: the article is his personal opinion. His style and vocabulary would make the article of interest to any reader. The article clearly illustrates London's points, but does not explore their implications, leaving the reader with many unanswered questions. Critical Annotation Taken from Myrin Virtual Library