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Slippery slides. 3 March Objectives . Analyze a text ( Gawain ) Analyze a text for characteristics of a ballad Summarize historical context of Gawain (gallery walk) Upcoming: Wed: Ballad/ Gawain quiz HW due: Grendel essay. Place in folder. Order for turning in: Rubric Typed

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3 march objectives
3 March Objectives
  • Analyze a text (Gawain)
  • Analyze a text for characteristics of a ballad
  • Summarize historical context of Gawain (gallery walk)
  • Upcoming:
    • Wed: Ballad/Gawain quiz
  • HW due: Grendel essay. Place in folder.
  • Order for turning in:
    • Rubric
    • Typed
    • Original (with my signature)
    • Drafting material
progress reports
Progress reports
  • Since we will not meet tomorrow, here is your progress report.
  • If you have a “D” or below, please have mom/dad sign it and return it or (better) have mom/dad email me.
  • Thanks.
warm up
Warm-up
  • BOB DYLAN!!!
  • Aw, man. He’s a rock star. Let’s listen to his ballad.
  • As you do so, identify the major traits of the ballad (review your notes).
  • 1. Tragic story? Summarize the story and describe its tragic-ness.
  • 2. Simple plot? One basic incident?
  • 3. Is there dialogue?
  • 4. How do the lyrics reflect the dialect of the characters?
the middle ages

The Middle Ages

1066-1534 AD

the norman conquest
The Norman Conquest
  • 1066 AD - The Battle of Hastings
  • One of the most important dates in all of Western history
  • Anglo-Saxon King Harold II killed in the battle
  • Duke of Normandy, William the Conqueror becomes king of England
  • After his victory at the Battle of Hastings, William marched on London and received the city's submission.
  • Crowned King of England.
  • No more Anglo-Saxons.
  • King spoke French at court and, eventually, French merged with Anglo-Saxon and became English.
  • See how important that was now?
major dates
Major Dates
  • 1096 AD - the beginning of the First Crusade.
  • 1215 AD - The Magna Carta
  • 1254 AD - the end of the Seventh Crusade
  • 1517 AD - Martin Luther posts his Ninety-Five Theses
  • If y’all don’t know what this means, it started the Protestant Church.
  • So, with a few exceptions, if you’re Christian, you’re either a Protestant or a Catholic. Before Luther, if you were a Christian, you were a Catholic.
  • 1534 AD - Henry VIII passes the Act of Supremacy
french influence
French Influence
  • Feudal System
  • Political: Premise that the king owns all land, distributes to loyal lords who distribute to lesser nobles, and the land is worked by the peasants (or serfs—basically slaves).
  • Church: The Pope is the head of the Church on Earth. Power is distributed to Archbishops, Bishops and lesser Church officials, and finally to lay officials and worshipers.
feudal pyramid
Feudal Pyramid

http://gcuonline.georgian.edu/wootton_l/Medieval_files/image004.gif

activity
Activity

Create a “feudal” pyramid for ArdreyKell—who’s at the top, who is at the bottom. It should mirror the form of the provided example, but may differ in the number of levels.

french influence1
French Influence
  • Societal
  • Chivalric Code: Code by which the knights lived, based on faith in the Christian God (specifically Catholicism), loyalty to their liege lord, and responsibility toward the people.
  • Rules of Courtly Love: Encouraged loyalty to the liege lord’s lady, often through completion of quests or deeds in her honor. Eventually came to require loyalty to the Virgin Mary.
the chivalric code from the song of roland
The Chivalric Code, from The Song of Roland

To guard the honor of fellow knights

To eschew unfairness, meanness and deceit

To keep faith

At all times to speak the truth

To persevere to the end in any enterprise begun

To respect the honor of women

Never to refuse a challenge from an equal

Never to turn the back upon a foe

  • To fear God and maintain His Church
  • To serve the liege lord in valor and faith
  • To protect the weak and defenseless
  • To give succor to widows and orphans
  • To refrain from the wanton giving of offense
  • To live by honor and for glory
  • To despise pecuniary reward
  • To fight for the welfare of all
  • To obey those placed in authority
activity1
Activity

Classify and divide the elements of the Chivalric Code:

Place them in groups and determine what they have in common—why did you group them the way that you did?

Each group should have a classification or category heading and a brief (1-2 sentence) explanation.

gawain passage analysis
Gawain passage analysis
  • 1. What descriptors give the reader the feeling of excess and abundance in lines 25-80? Why might this appeal to the audience of the Middle Ages? Today’s audience?
  • 2. What gives the impression that Arthur is an unusual kind of king? How does that affect our impression of him as a leader (l. 85)?
  • 3. The author spends lots of time describing the Green Knight in lines 137-205. What first impressions do you have of this character?
  • 4. Why would the poet describe the Green Knight as both huge and graceful? Ghastly and opulent? What effect does this use of paradox have on our perception of the Knight (ll. 140-145)?
  • 5. Why has the Knight sought out the men in Arthur’s court? Why not another king’s court (ll. 257-283)?
  • 6. Why is Gawain facing the Knight instead of Arthur (l. 345)? What are Gawain’s apparent virtues and strengths?
  • 7. How does the Knight’s description of the stellar reputation of Arthur and his court spur the knights on to accept the challenge? How is hubris involved (ll. 257-338)?
  • 8. Should a knight in Arthur’s court have accepted the challenge of the Green Knight? Why or why not? Consider what you've learned of chivalry.
  • 9. What is Gawain’s motive for accepting the challenge?
  • 10. Why did the poet include such a gruesome description of the beheading of the Knight in lines 424-443? Describe, too, the humor of the scene.
close and hw
Close and HW
  • HW: Read part 2. Answer part 2 study guide questions.
  • CLOSE: Dude! He played soccer with that guy’s head! How are we not drawing that already! That’s freakin’ awesome.
  • Write a bob and wheel to describe how awesome it is (or, at least, how awesome I think it is)
4 march objectives
4 March Objectives
  • Analyze film for genre characteristics.
  • HW due: surprisingly none.
  • Upcoming:
    • Wed: Ballad/Gawain quiz
close and hw1
Close and HW

HW: Finish part 2. Quiz tomorrow. Study ballad traits.

CLOSE: What modern day sagas have Arthurian traits.

Choose two of the traits discussed in the film and, in a ticket out, explain how your modern day story exemplifies those traits.

5 march objectives
5 March Objectives
  • Analyze a text for theme and historical context
  • React to modern criticism of a text
  • YOU HAVE TO BE IN ALL YOUR CLASSES ON THE DAY OF YOUR BOARDS TO BE ALLOWED TO PRESENT THAT NIGHT.
  • Due: Nothing, really. I don’t need to check your study guide. You should do it because I’m using it to write the test . . .
  • Upcoming:
    • Quiz today.
    • Next Tuesday: Gawain/Arthur/Ballads test
so what is gawain
So what is Gawain?
  • It’s a poem.
  • And it sure feels epic.
  • What is an epic poem?
old english middle english
Old English Middle English

HWÆT, WE GAR-DEna in geardagum, þeodcyningaþrymgefrunon, huðaæþelingasellenfremedon! oft ScyldScefingsceaþenaþreatum, monegummægþummeodosetlaofteah, egsodeeorlas, syððanærestwearðfeasceaftfunden; he þæsfrofregebad,weox under wolcnumweorðmyndumþah,oðþæt him æghwylcymbsittendraoferhronradehyranscolde, gombangyldan; þætwæs god cyning!

Þiskyng lay at CamylotvponKrystmasse

With monyluflychlorde, ledez of þe best,

Rekenly of þeRounde Table alleþo rich breþer,

With rychreueloryȝt and rechlesmerþes.

Þertournayedtulkes by tymezfulmony,

Justedfuljoliléþisegentylekniȝtes,

Syþenkayred to þe court caroles to make.

For þerþe fest watzilychefulfiftendayes,

With alleþe mete and þemirþeþat men couþeavyse;

Such glaumandegle glorious to here,

Deredynvpon day, daunsyng on nyȝtes,

Al watz hap vponheȝe in hallez and chambrez

With lordez and ladies, as leuest him þoȝt.

alliterative romance
Alliterative Romance
  • Written on subjects representative of the time: kings and knights, Courtly Love, the Chivalric Code
  • Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is an excellent example of an Alliterative Romance.
alliterative romance1
Alliterative Romance
  • Written combination of two oral traditions
    • Anglo-Saxon Scops
      • Long poems with heavy usage of Alliteration
    • French Troubadours
      • Long poems with heavy usage of Rhyming
alliterative romance2
Alliterative Romance
  • Made up of extended stanzas, with alliteration predominant in the first part.
  • Stanzas end in a Bob-and-Wheel
    • Made up of 5 lines:
      • 1st line is the “Bob” at the end of the open stanza – A rhyme
      • Last 4 lines, the “Wheel”, have an ABAB rhyme scheme
the chivalric code from the song of roland1
The Chivalric Code, from The Song of Roland

To guard the honor of fellow knights

To eschew unfairness, meanness and deceit

To keep faith

At all times to speak the truth

To persevere to the end in any enterprise begun

To respect the honor of women

Never to refuse a challenge from an equal

Never to turn the back upon a foe

  • To fear God and maintain His Church
  • To serve the liege lord in valor and faith
  • To protect the weak and defenseless
  • To give succor to widows and orphans
  • To refrain from the wanton giving of offense
  • To live by honor and for glory
  • To despise pecuniary reward
  • To fight for the welfare of all
  • To obey those placed in authority
ballads gawain quiz
Ballads/Gawain quiz
  • Usual quiz procedure.
  • After quiz, pick up the article.
  • Read, annotate, answer questions, kick a severed head around like a soccer ball.
  • We’ll discuss 10 minutes after last quiz is complete.
  • If you finish and are waiting for your classmates, begin reading Part 3 (due tomorrow)
five virtues p 77
Five virtues p. 77
  • Love and friendship for other men.
  • Freedom from sin.
  • Courtesy that never fails.
  • Pity for others.
close and hw2
Close and HW
  • HW: Read part 3, answer questions (online—I might actually check these)
  • Close: create a feudal pyramid for AK (go beyond usual considerations of Mr. Switzer on top—consider actual social dynamics of this school) or the U.S. or some other compatible social system.
  • Be sure to identify your social system.
  • Make it PRETTY!!! I wanna hang these up.
feudal pyramid1
Feudal Pyramid

http://gcuonline.georgian.edu/wootton_l/Medieval_files/image004.gif

6 march objectives
6 March Objectives
  • Close read a passage for literary devices
  • Analyze a passage for theme
  • Due: Nothing
  • Upcoming:
    • More than likely, your Medieval test (Gawain, Arthur, ballads) will be moved from Tuesday to Thursday)
    • Product proposal due on 3.10. (Form online.)
    • Next Friday (3.14): Vocab. 10 quiz
quick questions
Quick questions
  • Epic poem. Big, violent story.
  • Beowulf is an epic poem. Who is the audience? What was the purpose?
  • Ballad. Quick, singable, entertaining.
  • “Barbara Ann” is a ballad. Who is the audience? What was the purpose?
  • Alliterative romance. Big, faith-based, chivalric story.
  • Gawain is an alliterative romance. Who is the audience? What was the purpose?
6 march 2014 warm up
6 March 2014: Warm Up

Assignment:

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 19. Identify any of the author’s use of figurative language (there are several) and its effect.

Devouring Time, blunt thou the lion’s paws,

And make the earth devour her own sweet brood;

Pluck the keen teeth from the fierce tiger’s jaws,

And burn the long-lived phoenix in her blood;

Make glad and sorry seasons as thou fleet’st,

And do whate’er thou wilt, swift-footed Time,

To the wide world and all her fading sweets,

But I forbid thee one most heinous crime:

O carve not with thy hours my love’s fair brow,

Nor draw no lines there with thine antique pen;

Him in thy course untainted do allow,

For beauty’s pattern to succeeding men.

Yet do thy worst, old Time: despite thy wrong,

My love shall in my verse ever live young.

slide32

The speaker in sonnet 19 personifies time. Time is “swift-footed” (6) moving quickly through the “wide world” (7) sparing no one. The speaker asks that Time avoid one more “heinous crime” (8): aging his lover. This, of course, is impossible. The speaker knows that, ultimately, Time will do its “worst” (13); his lover will age and die, and so will he. So, at least, he has preserved his lover’s beauty eternally in the lines he’s written, where she will live “ever [ . . . ] young” (14).

Devouring Time, blunt thou the lion’s paws,

And make the earth devour her own sweet brood;

Pluck the keen teeth from the fierce tiger’s jaws,

And burn the long-lived phoenix in her blood;

Make glad and sorry seasons as thou fleet’st,

And do whate’er thou wilt, swift-footed Time,

To the wide world and all her fading sweets,

But I forbid thee one most heinous crime:

O carve not with thy hours my love’s fair brow,

Nor draw no lines there with thine antique pen;

Him in thy course untainted do allow,

For beauty’s pattern to succeeding men.

Yet do thy worst, old Time: despite thy wrong,

My love shall in my verse ever live young.

literary device tracing
Literary Device Tracing
  • Let’s start with one together. Go back to lines 20-21. Using the alliteration there, write a response that analyzes why the poet used it.
  • The speaker in sonnet 19 personifies time. Time is “swift-footed” (6) moving quickly through the “wide world” (7), sparing no one. The speaker asks that Time avoid one more “heinous crime” (8): aging his lover. This, of course, is impossible. The speaker knows that, ultimately, Time will do its “worst” (13); his lover will age and die, and so will he. So, at least, he has persevered his lover’s beauty eternally in the lines he’s written, where she will live “ever [ . . . ] young” (14).
  • The poet of Gawain begins with a brief description of the mythological origin of Britain. He rapidly marks in two successive lines that “Brutus’ Britain grew rich/In battle-bold knights” (20-21). The alliteration here note only marks the violent beginnings of Britain but starkly contrasts with “Gawain/The good” (108-109). The hero of this alltierative romance isn’t a violent battler; he is a chivalric, faithful Christian whose only goal is to provide England with “[f]ar more . . . [w]onderful things” (23-24) through his selfless service.
close reading continued
Close reading continued
  • With a partner who is not sitting in your row, re-read and analyze lines 941-994.
  • What literary devices are used in this passage?
  • What is their effect?
  • What is the significance of this passage.
  • Think pair share
  • NOW Choose three of the following literary devices and find one example of each from Part II of SGGK. Write out three separate responses that analyze the use of the devices you have found.
    • Allusion, Archetype, Characterization, Foreshadowing, Imagery, Irony, Metaphor, Motif, Parallelism, Personification, Simile, Symbolism, Tone
passage close reading
Passage Close Reading
  • With a partner, turn to the description of Sir Gawain shield on lines 592-669 of the work.
  • Analyze the significance and symbolism of his weaponry and preparations to leave.
  • Annotate. Don’t miss anything of importance.
slide37
ACH!
  • That last pentangle was student generated, and it was horrible!
  • I bet you can do better . . .
  • (Did anyone bring glitter glue today? Glitter glue is awesome. You can, like, put it on stuff and it sticks and it’s glittery all at the same time. And you’re all like, Shamwow, and he’s all like, Dang straight, and you’re all like, Rock on. And it’s all purpley or greeney and sparkly and, like, sticky.)
hw and close
HW and Close
  • HW: Finish Gawain
  • Make a prediction (if you have not finished)—what will happen when Sir Gawain meets the Green Knight in Part IV?
7 march objectives
7 March Objectives
  • Herd cats
  • Analyze lit for lit devices
  • Analyze lit for themes
  • Due: Nothing? Again? Man . . .
  • Upcoming:
    • Product proposal (form online) due Mnday
    • Medieval test next Thursday
    • Vocab. 10 quiz next Friday
    • Vocab. 10 journal due next Friday
i wandered lonely as a cloud by wordsworth
“I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” by Wordsworth

I WANDERED lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed--and gazed--but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:

For oft, when on my couch I lie In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils.

slide41

The personification of nature is in stark contrast to the simile that begins the poem. We are prepared for the speaker to be sad. He is, after all, “lonely as a cloud” (1). But it’s clear that he’s not sad at all. The “jocund company” (line) he keeps cheers him up. Nature is his friend; therefore, he’s a hippy and smelly.

the product

The Product

Dun, dun, DUN!

graduation project product
Graduation Project Product

The product is a potentially real-life application of your research.

Most ideas can be completed, but you want to make sure that it is a high-level extension of your research.

graduation project product1
Graduation Project Product
  • There are some products that are usually unacceptable:
    • Brochures
    • Scrapbooks
    • Posters & Tri-folds
    • Websites
  • These are frequently viewed as “receptacles” for your papers. Talk to me if you think you want to do any of these.
product ideas to consider
Product Ideas to Consider
  • Offers a solution to a problem
    • Creates an organization
    • A bill/law
  • Applies research to real life
    • Running a marathon
    • Creating a work of art
    • Trying a lifestyle, i.e. becoming a vegetarian
product ideas to consider1
Product Ideas to Consider
  • Is educational
    • Teaching an audience
    • Creating a guide or educational resource
  • Is a learning/service experience
    • Volunteerism
    • Internship (in which you apply your research)
    • Scientific experiment
guiding questions
Guiding Questions
  • Who could benefit from your research; who is your audience?
  • What is the most effective way to convey your research (even continuing) to them?
  • What is the best way to present this product to the board?
    • Should be professional quality
    • Must clearly indicate your process and the purpose of your product—you may not explain it.
learning over time depth of knowledge
Learning Over Time & Depth of Knowledge
  • Chooses a product demonstrating significant learning over time
  • Demonstrates a significant, logical and relevant link to research topic
  • Demonstrates comprehensive, critical analysis of research in developing an original product
  • Demonstrates exceptional creative thinking, decision-making, reasoning, and/or problem-solving
  • Demonstrates extensive connection to real world situations (takes research “on the road”)
quality of work effort
Quality of Work/Effort
  • Exhibits creative and exceptional results using talents, abilities and varied resources
    • Displays extensive use of detail
  • Displays evidence of exceptional technical, creative &/or organizational skills
  • Product demonstrates exceptional quality that exceeds 15 hours of time and effort
bottom line
Bottom Line
  • To receive a 4 on the product you need:
  • Professional quality work presented, regardless of how long it takes
  • Creative, well-thought out work
  • Clear, effective form of presentation
  • Obvious links to the real world and to your research
  • Something that shows that you have learned through the process of creation
surprise pop quiz
Surprise! Pop quiz
  • Usual quiz procedures.
  • Post quiz: Begin work on the graphic organizer on the next page.
  • Finish with partner when all quizzes are in.
10 march objectives
10 March Objectives
  • Write concisely. Analyze for figurative language.
  • Use vocab. words in context
  • Analyze a text for characteristics
  • HW due: Product proposal
  • Upcoming:
    • Gawain seminar Tuesday
    • Medieval test next Thursday
    • Vocab. 10 quiz next Friday
    • Vocab. 10 journal due next Friday
vocab 10 journal
Vocab. 10 journal
  • Define word in your own words
  • Use word in a sentence
  • Part of speech of word (as used in sentence)
  • Draw a pretty picture. Word.
  • Rebuff, Attenuate, Inure, Oscillate, Forgo, Cavil, Foible, Reconnoiter, Decimate , Charlatan, Askance, benign, fraught, luminous, obsequious, obtuse, penitent, peremptory, shambles, sporadic
short answer review
Short answer review
  • In line 501, the author personifies the seasons. The seasons move quickly. This description provides an example of the seasons chasing each other.
  • Avoid “the author.”
  • Show me the personification.
  • Explain why it’s important to show the passage of time through personification.
slide56

In contrast to the planting of seeds and new beginnings, “autumn comes rushing, calling the plants [t]o watch for winter” (521). Autumn’s warning is foreshadowing to a rough journey that Gawain will encounter. The leaves “[a]re thrown from the trees and lie dead on the ground” (526). The personification of nature here foreshadows what the Green Knight will do to Gawain.

fix it
Fix it
  • The poet uses imagery in line 618 where it states, “Then they carried in his shield, striped with bright red; a pentangle star painted pure gold.” This is important because the shield is an essential piece of the plot of the story and by using imagery it creates a good picture for the reader.
  • Avoid “the poet uses”
  • Integrate quote
  • Why is it “an essential piece of the plot of the story”?
  • Avoid “the reader”
pop quiz passage close reading
Pop Quiz: Passage Close Reading
  • Get out a sheet of paper.
  • Find one example of a literary device in Part III or Part IV
  • Write a sentence or two in which you analyze the effect of the author’s use of that device.
  • These are the devices you may find.
  • Alliteration, Allusion, Archetype, Characterization, Foreshadowing, Imagery, Irony, Metaphor, Motif, Parallelism, Personification, Simile, Symbolism, Tone
le morte d arthur
Le MorteD’Arthur
  • Alliteration, Allusion, Archetype, Characterization, Foreshadowing, Imagery, Irony, Metaphor, Motif, Parallelism, Personification, Simile, Symbolism, Tone
  • Read intro to Arthur on 246.
  • We’ll begin together, but finish reading on your own the first chapter of Le MorteD’Arthur that is provided in your textbook, beginning on page 246.
  • As you read, keep a brief summary of the text.
    • Be sure to identify major plot points and any conflicts in the text.
    • In addition, note anything that helps to characterize Sir Gawain and King Arthur in this text.
study guide review
Study guide review
  • Close reading passages
hw and close1
HW and Close
  • HW: Seminar prep. Bring whatever you think is worth 15 points. Consider what I’ve had you do in the past, and points you’re going to have to make in the seminar. Questions?
  • CLOSE: CHART!!!!
11 march 2014
11 March 2014
  • Discuss literature and refer to specific passages.
  • Analyze literature for theme and literary devices.
  • HW due: Seminar prep
  • Note: Please inform the Twitter that Campolmi does not know what’s up. Nor does he have any desire to do so. Ain’t that right, Kramer?
  • Upcoming:
    • Medieval test Thursday
    • Vocab. 10 quiz Friday
    • Vocab. 10 journal due Friday
king arthur questions
King Arthur questions
  • Why is Arthur so mad at Launcelot?
  • Who is Sir Modred?
  • Sir Bors, Sir Lyonel and Sir Galyhud are aligned with what side? Sir Gawain is backing whom?
  • What does it mean to “break spears” (line 59)?
  • Why does Launcelot accept Gawain’s challenge?
  • What is Gawain’s secret enchantment?
  • Why does Gawain call Launcelot a traitor?
  • What is the “dishonor” Launcelot will not allow himself to commit?
  • What prevents Gawain from battling Launcelot again?
  • Dude. Modred is a jerk. What’s the first jerky thing he does in this section?
  • And the second jerky thing he does?
  • How does Gwynevere respond to Modred’s offenses?
  • “The answer lies in the people of Britain” (190). What answer and huh?
  • What happens to—OH no! Gawain is dead! AHHHH! What does he do before he dies?
  • What is Arthur’s strange dream?
  • What starts the final battle between Arthur and Modred’s armies?
  • And what happens to Arthur? And who told him not to fight Modred? And did he listen? Noooooooo. Stupid king . . .
  • And what does the last two lines mean?
pairs activity
Pairs Activity
  • With a partner, compare and contrast King Arthur’s and Sir Gawain’s portrayals in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and in Le MorteD’Arthur.
    • Identify specific similarities and specific differences.
    • Make sure to use textual support.
  • These may be bulleted out or in the form of a comparison chart (T, Venn Diagram), but both partners should have the characterization comparison written down. It may be helpful to look at the book’s definition of characterization on p. R107 for in order to write a full characterization of Gawain. (In other words, find all the elements as defined in the book.)
sir gawain and the green knight seminar
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Seminar
  • Fishbowl
  • Take notes when outside of the circle.
  • Make sure to listen and respond to your peers.
  • 15 points for prep.
  • 5 points per relevant point made.
  • Post seminar: Write down reflections of this seminar.
seminar reflection
Seminar Reflection
  • What is one contribution that you made of which you are proud?
  • What is one thing on which you would like to improve in our next seminar? How will you do this?
  • Identify one peer who made an excellent contribution and explain what it was.
  • What is one question that you feel was overlooked or under-treated?
hw and close2
HW and CLOSE
  • HW: None.
  • Write 5 questions that could be on Thursday’s test.
  • Topics:
    • Ballads
    • Middle Ages cultural info
    • Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
    • Le MorteD’Arthur
12 march objectives
12 March Objectives
  • Analyze and summarize lit
  • Identify characteristics of a ballad
  • Review Grendel essays, noting errors
  • Due: Nothing
  • Upcoming:
    • Medieval test Thursday
    • Vocab. 10 quiz Friday
    • Vocab. 10 journal due Friday
your seminars
Your seminars . . .
  • Both blocks: ASK OPEN ENDED QUESTIONS.
  • For example, which of the following is open ended?
  • What does the pentangle represent?
  • How have the characteristics of a hero changed in our culture?
  • Hmmmm . . .
  • Is there anything wrong with asking a question that tasks your classmates’ opinions?
  • Can you do this without personally attacking your classmates?
3 rd block
3rd block
  • “Did not gain much. Kind of lackluster.”
  • “Next seminar, maybe I’ll do more research.”
  • “Keep the conversation going.”
  • “[My classmate] made excellent contributions because he kept asking questions to keep the discussion going.”
  • “I definitely dominated the conversation but literally no one in my group talked. I was only trying to keep the conversation going.”
4 th block
4th block
  • The whole issue with the lady’s name was easily solved: She’s a plot device. She’s there to advance the story. Neither she nor the lord can be named because then Gawain will know who they are, and so will the audience.
  • Wow. 2nd group. You applied the poem to your lives and opinions.
  • Urgh. 2nd group. Like five people dominated that discussion.
  • We were very respectful of everyone’s beliefs, and that was important as we went down the wormhole of discussing the religious elements of the text.
  • Thank you so much for discussing without being impolite.
slide73
So . . .
  • What makes literature interesting?
  • It’s alive. It’s active. It’s applicable to our lives.
  • Our interpretations of it reflects our opinions.
  • We can apply it to our lives!
  • It exists in a moment of time, but is timeless.
  • For example, look at this:
ballad review
Ballad review
  • Read the ballad “Robin Hood and the Three Squires” on pg. 220 of your textbook and identify the six traits of a medieval ballad:
    • Alternating rhymes
    • Tragic or sensational subject material
    • Strong narrative quality (tells a story)
    • Often includes a dialogue between characters
    • Repetition of certain lines/events or a refrain
    • A twist (shift in tone or a surprise ending)
  • Provide line numbers of an example of each. For the third trait, summarize the story.
arthur lit circles
Arthur lit circles
  • Let’s look at the directions and then I will assign you your groups.
grendel essays
Grendel essays
  • Lost easy points on formatting.
  • Integrate quotes.
  • On p. 120, Grendel says, “I killed a goat.”
  • Properly punctuate quotes.
  • “Grendel kills the goat.” (ch. 7, pg. 120).
  • Phrases to strike forever from your writing:
  • “Throughout the novel . . . ”
  • “Allows the reader to see . . . ”
  • “This can be seen when . . . ”
  • “Shows the reader . . . ”
  • GRRRR!!!
the game
The Game

With your assigned partner create a graphic organizer that traces the game played by Sir Gawain and the Lord of the Castle throughout Part III.

At the top of your page, write the rules of the game, then create a chart that mirrors the one found below.

hw and close3
HW and close
  • Study:
    • Gawain study guide
    • Arthur study notes
    • Ballad characteristics
    • In class notes
    • CLOSE: Let’s look at some of those questions you wrote yesterday.
slide80

Foster: Why does Gawain offer himself in place of the king?

Micah: What was the lord’s real name?

Danny: How did Gawain evade death?

Jack: What is the significance of the girdle?

Dustin and Cory: How is the lady testing Gawain?

Ben: temptation.

No name: What are the points of the chivalry code?

Dylan: What impact does sexuality have on the theme of the story? (I’ve already told you this is a multiple choice test. I’d like you to think about what MC answers for the above question would be . . . ) 

Good luck: Study

13 march 2014
13 March 2014
  • TEST!
  • Analyze lit for theme, characterization, devices, historical context.
  • HW due: None
  • Upcoming:
    • Vocab. 10 quiz Friday
    • Vocab. 10 journal due Friday
usual test procedures
Usual test procedures
  • Use your old scantron
  • Pencil
  • Post test: Read the article on satire and answer the questions.
  • HW: Vocab. 10 journal
hw and close4
HW and close
  • HW: vocab. 10 journal
  • Close: Thoughts on the test?