because i could not stop for death n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Because I could not stop for Death- - PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Because I could not stop for Death- -

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 12

Because I could not stop for Death- - - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 233 Views
  • Uploaded on

And she’s talking about Death…again!. Have you heard the one about the Englishman, the Irishman, Death and the 1860s poet?. Because I could not stop for Death- -. 26 th February 2014. EXAM DETAILS. Friday 16 th May 2014 AM 2 hours One hour – Dorian Gray One hour – Emily Dickinson

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Because I could not stop for Death- -' - tuyen


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
because i could not stop for death

And she’s talking about Death…again!

Have you heard the one about the Englishman, the Irishman, Death and the 1860s poet?

Because I could not stop for Death--

26th February 2014

exam details
EXAM DETAILS
  • Friday 16thMay 2014 AM
  • 2 hours
  • One hour – Dorian Gray
  • One hour – Emily Dickinson
  • CLOSED BOOK (No texts) so LEARN THE POEMS!
slide3

Because I could not stop for Death--He kindly stopped for me-- The Carriage held but just Ourselves-- And Immortality.We slowly drove--He knew no hasteAnd I had put awayMy labor and my leisure too,For His Civility--We passed the School, where Children stroveAt Recess--in the Ring-- We passed the Fields of Gazing Grain-- We passed the Setting Sun--Or rather--He passed us--The Dews drew quivering and chill--For only Gossamer, my Gown--My Tippet--only Tulle--

We paused before a House that seemedA Swelling of the Ground--The Roof was scarcely visible--The Cornice--in the Ground--

Since then--'tis Centuries--and yetFeels shorter than the DayI first surmised the Horses' Heads Were toward Eternity—

consider these versions
Consider these versions…
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NTcgZ4uetiY
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDOfwqqtGE8
slide5

This carries the suggestion that we do not choose when we die.

The start here almost sounds as if we are joining in the middle of a conversation. It is far more ‘active’ than many of Dickinson’s poems.

Because I could not stop for Death--He kindly stopped for me-- The Carriage held but just Ourselves-- And Immortality.

As in other poems, Death is capitalised but here she is creating a character – ‘a gentleman caller’.

There is an acceptance of death – it is not something to be feared.

Notice how she capitalises the Carriage, Ourselves and Immortality. Why might those be important? Immortality might suggest there is life after death?

slide6

The poem moves from ‘We’ – Emily and Death - to ‘He’ – Death himself who controls the journey. The slow pace perhaps creates a sense of suspense but also reinforces the relaxed, fearless mood of her relationship with Death.

We slowly drove--He knew no hasteAnd I had put awayMy labor and my leisure too,For His Civility--

Does this suggest she has done it because Death is so charming or simply that she has replaced work etc with Death’s company?

Just as Death is relaxed so she has put worldly cares – work and leisure - to one side to be with him.

slide7

She suggests that the view is very normal – what she sees contrasts with the strangeness of the journey. Perhaps the sight of children suggests the start of life.

We passed the School, where Children stroveAt Recess--in the Ring-- We passed the Fields of Gazing Grain-- We passed the Setting Sun--

‘Gazing’ suggests an element of personification – perhaps the heads of grain shake at their passing.

Note the repetition (anaphora) of ‘We passed’ – as she repeated ‘Far safer…’ in “One need not be a chamber…”. This repetition may echo the horses’ hooves.

The ‘setting sun’ may suggest not only the end of the day but also the end of life.

slide8

Perhaps the sun is passing as the day (life?) moves on but it may also suggest that she is left in cold and darkness. The sun now is also personified. We have moved from the cheery school and fields to an eerie mood.

The evening dew has set in creating a real chill in her – a regular image associated with death. She is particularly chilled because…

Or rather--He passed us--The Dews drew quivering and chill--For only Gossamer, my Gown--My Tippet--only Tulle--

The fact that these are so thin adds to the feeling that she is underprepared – Death has dictated this journey, not her.

…Her clothes are thin and silky (gossamer and tulle). Her tippet is a thin shawl.

slide9

If there is any doubt that she is referring to a grave this settles it. A new grave tends to look just like this.

Death has taken her to her grave but the fact she refers to it as a house gives it a sense of comfort. It is not cold and threatening as a grave or tomb would be.

We paused before a House that seemedA Swelling of the Ground--The Roof was scarcely visible--The Cornice--in the Ground--

She suggests that although she cannot really see it she knows exactly what it is but…

…as before, there is little fear here. She is not afraid of Death himself and she sees her tomb simply as a house.

slide10

A bit of a cliché – it feels just like yesterday. It stresses how vivid her memory seems.

Suddenly we realise this is not something that is happening now – it is something that happened a long time ago. Who then, is the voice of the poem?

Since then--'tis Centuries--and yetFeels shorter than the DayI first surmised the Horses' Heads Were toward Eternity—

This is the first mention of the horses – although people in Dickinson’s time may well have expected a carriage to be pulled by horses.

The horses point towards eternity – is that eternal life or just another term for death? Does the final dash leave that as open ended – we just drift onwards?

summary
Summary
  • Although she is focused on Death, this does not seem to be Dickinson’s own experience. Rather, she is adopting the voice of another person.
  • Do we know she is dead from the start or do we see the poem as a journey from life to death?
  • What impression do we get of Death?
  • What sense of spirituality is there in the poem?
themes
THEMES

How can you link this poem to others?

Things to consider:

Death

The afterlife

How do the feelings here contrast with those in “It was not Death”, “One need not be a chamber” or even “I felt a funeral in my brain”? Think about the imagery she uses in each.