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NAEP Procurement Academy Tier III: Senior Professional. Ray Jensen, C.P.M. – Arizona State University Craig Passey, C.P.M. – Brigham Young University. Introductions. Why we do them Why they’re valuable. NAEP. Your Association Resources. NAEP Academy Overview. Foundation:.

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naep procurement academy tier iii senior professional

NAEP Procurement AcademyTier III: Senior Professional

Ray Jensen, C.P.M. – Arizona State University

Craig Passey, C.P.M. – Brigham Young University

slide2

Introductions

  • Why we do them
  • Why they’re valuable
slide3
NAEP
  • Your Association
  • Resources
naep academy overview
NAEP Academy Overview

Foundation:

  • Legal Aspects
  • Procurement Cycle
  • Sourcing
  • Specification Development
  • Bid Evaluations
naep academy overview1
NAEP Academy Overview

Professional:

  • Contract Formation
  • Contract Administration
  • Ethics
  • Negotiations
  • Finance
  • Relationship Management
naep academy overview2
NAEP Academy Overview

Senior Professional:

  • Managing People
    • Writing Job Descriptions
    • Performance Reviews
    • Discipline
  • Partnerships and Organizational Dynamics
  • Legal Aspects
  • Leadership
overview of segment
Overview of Segment
  • Building the Foundation for Leadership
  • Strategic Planning from 30,000 feet
  • Understanding the Pathway to Change
  • You as a Leader
it s all about you initially
It’s all about you (initially)
  • Start with Life’s Big Questions
    • Who am I?
    • Why am I here?
    • Where am I going?
    • What do I have to offer?
  • Why this matters
    • Identity - Values - Alignment
  • What I do flows from who I am.
alignment
Alignment
  • Your institution has a mission
    • What is it?
  • It also has a vision and goals
    • These will change over time
  • These key elements are “Top / Down”
    • Governing Board
    • Senior Executive
slide13

Alignment

  • In order to succeed, these must align:
    • Personal Values and Skills
    • Institutional Mission
    • Departmental Role
  • Understanding your Role
understanding your role
Understanding Your Role
  • Go back to the big questions
    • Who are we? Values
    • Why are we here? Mission
    • Where are we going? Vision
    • What do we have to offer? People / Skills
  • Which is the most important?
    • Jim Collins
  • The Core – “Big Rocks”
big rocks defined
Big Rocks Defined
  • The Core Elements of your Mission
  • This is your unit’s purpose
  • Made up of sub-projects / programs or functions
  • May overlap with the Big Rocks of other units

Big Rock

Big Rock

questions to ask
Questions To Ask

Source: The Filardo Group Library, 2007

slide22

What do you do?

Source: The Filardo Group Library, 2007

slide23

How well do you do what you do?

Source: The Filardo Group Library, 2007

slide24

Can you validate your standard of performance by reliable, relevant data from those you serve?

Source: The Filardo Group Library, 2007

slide25

What service level do you want to have?

Source: The Filardo Group Library, 2007

slide26

Do you know your gaps between your current and desired service level?

Source: The Filardo Group Library, 2007

slide27

Do you know what you will need to reach your desired service level?

Source: The Filardo Group Library, 2007

slide29

Big Rock

Little Rock

Little Rock

Little Rock

Little Rock

Little Rock

Little Rock

slide30

Best In Class

Better

Good

Below Average

slide31

Big Rock

Little Rock

Little Rock

Little Rock

Little Rock

Little Rock

Little Rock

ok what next
OK… What Next?
  • Identify the Little Rocks
  • Determine your current service level
  • Decide if the Little Rock is critical
  • List resources needed to maintain the current service level
slide35

Future Focus

Where are you now?

Situation

Analysis

Where do you want to go?

Mission

Vision

Values

Key Result Areas

How will you get to where you want to go?

Strategy

Goals

Action Steps

where are you
Where are you?
  • What is your reputation for value?
    • How does that impact
      • Programs?
      • Processes?
  • Are your resources increasing or decreasing?
    • Tangible and intangible
  • Is customer participation increasing or decreasing?
your reputation for value
Your reputation for value
  • Product (Program) Leadership
  • Operational Excellence
  • Customer Loyalty (Intimacy)
product program leadership
Product (Program) Leadership
  • What we must offer:
    • Leading edge stuff
    • Know what your customers need before they do
    • New applications for existing programs
    • Program delivery through new vehicles
    • Build reputation for execution with excellence
slide39

Product (Program) Leadership

  • What we must do:
    • Develop a culture that supports invention, innovation and risk taking
    • Accept mistakes
    • Be able to scan market and customers
    • Develop faster program development process
    • Leapfrog current programs
slide40
More
  • What we must do
    • Keep your eye on financial stability
    • Provide very good customer service and support for the products and programs you offer
operational excellence
Operational Excellence
  • What we must offer:
    • Combine programs of value with ease of use
    • Provide proven products and service more effectively than others
    • Understand your customer needs
    • Use customer feedback
slide42
More
  • What we must offer:
    • Build reputation on being
      • Effective
      • Efficient
    • Commitment to providing or being of value to your customers
operational excellence1
Operational Excellence
  • What we must do:
    • Review and reshape infrastructure
    • Operate with financial stability and security
    • Use economies of scale to keep your costs down
    • Provide high quality customer service
    • Develop rapid, responsive service delivery systems
customer loyalty intimacy
Customer Loyalty (Intimacy)
  • What we must offer:
    • Closer relationships with customers
    • Programs and services tailored to specific customer groups
    • Understanding of customer segments
    • Constantly upgraded programs and services
slide45
More
  • What we must offer:
    • Loyalty – – stand behind your customer
    • Programs, products and services that make your customers successful
    • Commitment to take care of individual customer needs
customer loyalty intimacy1
Customer Loyalty (Intimacy)
  • What we must do:
    • Focus on relationship
      • Building – Managing – Maintaining
    • Increase ability to customize programs
    • Focus on key or core customers
    • Develop customer relationship databases
slide47
More
  • What we must do:
    • Create a culture that embraces relationships
    • Delegate authority to those closest to your customers
      • Empower with freedom to make mistakes
where are you1
Where are you?
  • Increasing Participation / Satisfaction
  • Increasing Resources
    • Opportunity to grow your market for existing programs and to add new products, programs and services.
where are you2
Where are you?
  • Shrinking Participation / Satisfaction
  • Increasing Resources
    • Opportunity to develop new programs and to abandon those that are not performing well.
where are you3
Where are you?
  • Increasing Participation / Satisfaction
  • Shrinking / Declining Resources
    • Opportunity to rebuild from your core purpose (mission), values, customers, programs and services.
where are you4
Where are you?
  • Shrinking Participation / Satisfaction
  • Shrinking / Declining Resources
    • Opportunity to turn it around, combine with other units, outsource or shut it down.
these are musts
These are musts!!
  • We must have a vision for our department, workgroup or service.
  • We must know why we are here (mission or core purpose).
  • We must be value driven or we will go off course. What are our values?
  • We must be customer focused and actively listen to our stakeholders.
    • Advisory groups - focus groups - surveys
more musts
More “Musts”
  • We must define the elements of an excellent experience.
    • What does a “win” look like?
    • Can that translate into measurable goals?
  • We must be aware of best practices that are adaptable to us.
    • Within higher ed
    • Wherever they exist
  • We must know how to measure our progress.
more musts1
More “Musts”
  • We must have the right people in the right places doing the right things.
  • We must focus on skillsets and training that we need to succeed.
  • We must use and move with emerging technology.
  • We must communicate effectively.
    • Internally – Customers - Stakeholders
you as a leader

You as a Leader

Styles and Qualities

slide58

Leadership Approaches

The Tony Soprano Approach

contrasting models of planning leadership
Contrasting Models of Planning Leadership

Traditional Approach

Contemporary Approach

• Directive • Collaborative

• Does Most of the Talking • Does More Listening

• Controlling • Empowering

• Has a Vision • Instills a Vision

• Results Oriented • Process & Results Oriented

• Unilateral Decision Making • Consensus-building

• A Director • A Coach, Teacher, Learner

• Source of Answers • Source of Questions

• Top-Down Communication and • Cross-Functional Communication Work Processes and Work Processes

• Sees Leaders only at the Top • Sees Leaders at all Levels

incorporate principles

VISION

GOAL

PRINCIPLES

INTENDED PATHWAY

Incorporate Principles
recognize reality

VISION

GOAL

PRINCIPLES

INTENDED PATHWAY

Recognize Reality

PROBLEMS OR CONDITIONS

seven levels of change2
Seven Levels of Change
  • Effectiveness
  • Efficiency
slide68

Seven Levels of Change

  • Effectiveness
  • Efficiency
  • Improving
seven levels of change3
Seven Levels of Change
  • Effectiveness
  • Efficiency
  • Improving
  • Cutting
seven levels of change4
Seven Levels of Change
  • Effectiveness
  • Efficiency
  • Improving
  • Cutting
  • Copying
seven levels of change5
Seven Levels of Change
  • Effectiveness
  • Efficiency
  • Improving
  • Cutting
  • Copying
  • Differentiation
seven levels of change6
Seven Levels of Change
  • Effectiveness
  • Efficiency
  • Improving
  • Cutting
  • Copying
  • Differentiation
  • Breakout!!
what is leadership
What is Leadership

“Leadership is unlocking people’s

potential to become better.”

- Bill Bradley

slide75

What is Leadership

“Leadership is the process of motivating, mobilizing, resourcing and directing people to passionately and strategically pursue a vision from God that a group jointly embraces.”

- George Barna

what is leadership1
What is Leadership

The ability to have a significant and positive influence on the world around you. It is healthy influence.

leaders worth following
Leaders Worth Following
  • Enhance the quality of our lives
  • Provide direction
  • Inspire creativity and action
  • Improve our ability to relate
  • Transform our lives
  • Leave us more fully human
leaders worth avoiding
Leaders Worth Avoiding
  • Self-serving
  • Crippling
  • Degrading
  • Destructive
i know it when i c it
I know it when I “C” it.
  • Confidence
  • Credibility
  • Competence
  • Commitment
  • Courage
  • Community
when i c it
…when I “C” it
  • Conviction
  • Communication
  • Charisma
  • Creativity
  • Character
  • Vision?? Not Possible!! Perhaps Cvision
elements of character development
Elements of Character Development
  • Plant what you want to grow
  • The power of example
  • The importance of a value system
  • Accountability
  • Heat
why beliefs are important
Why Beliefs are Important

What I believe creates

My expectations, which influences

My attitude, which affects

My behavior, which drives

My performance, and eventually

My destiny

accountability
Accountability
  • Character cannot be developed alone
  • Discipline
  • Discovery
  • Disclosure
  • Direction
  • The Johari Window
johari window
Johari Window

Disclosed by Others

Known to Me

Unknown to Me

Known to you

Disclosed To Others

Unknown to you

johari window1
Johari Window

Disclosed by Others

Known to Me

Unknown to Me

Integrity

Known to you

Enlarged

Disclosed To Others

Unknown to you

Ascent of a Leader: Thrall, McNicol & McElrath

personal practices
Personal Practices
  • Be the employee you’d want to hire
    • “Be the change you want to see.” – Gandhi
  • You can’t know it all or do it all
  • Change is the constant
  • Try not to get discouraged
  • God put a night between each day
    • That means we get fresh starts
slide90

Lunch

Break

slide91

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

The special case of non-profits

Peter Drucker’s insight:

From Managing the Nonprofit Organization: Principles and Practices, 1990 by Peter Drucker

slide92

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Case Study:

SOFTWARE ACQUISITION (with a Hitch)*

*A stop or sudden halt; a stoppage; an impediment; a temporary obstruction; an obstacle

slide93

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Align your priorities and objectives

It’s about job security

It’s about leadership

It’s about satisfaction and legacy

slide94

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Align your priorities and objectives

Success Metric:

Do you have a seat at the table?

slide95

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Keep Stakeholders Informed

What form? Written or Verbal?

Tips

slide96

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Keep Stakeholders Informed

Your VIP would rather get a computer virus or worm than have you make this one communications mistake.

slide97

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Preparation:

Show immediate respect by scheduling an appointment convenient to the stakeholder

State the topic and reason for the interview asking for the other person’s guidance, counsel, opinion, etc.

slide98

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Preparation:

Never use email or even a phone call for a sensitive issue. Why?

Schedule the first discussion on the stakeholder’s turf where they will be relaxed and comfortable. Why?

slide99

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Passey’s 7 P’s to Success

Prior

Proper

Planning

Prevents

Pitiful

Poor

Performance

slide100

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Planning & Strategy

Map the key players

Who are the influential players?

Who is likely to block making the decision?

Who approves?

Who implements?

Who will be impacted by the decision?

slide101

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Planning & Strategy

If you know the person, anticipate their response to what you are recommending—favorable, opposed, or neutral?

What concerns will the stakeholder have regarding the topic and decision to be made? Are any of those concerns likely to impact the stakeholder personally? Are there stakeholders who likely have the wrong incentives?

slide102

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Planning & Strategy

Is the key decision-maker a leader or follower?

Risk-taker or not? How does that impact your strategy?

Are there a manageable number of parties involved?

slide103

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Planning & Strategy

Research related information

Use both public and internal sources

Seek knowledgeable advisers who have experience on the issue

slide104

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Planning & Strategy

After doing research and mapping stakeholders,

ask yourself:

Where do I want this to wind up?

slide105

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

What stands in the way of getting there?

slide106

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

  • Plan for differences which will become apparent as the discussion evolves. For example:
      • Predictions about the future
      • Attitudes towards risk
      • Attitudes towards time
      • Tax status
      • Regulatory compliance and accounting
      • Impact of constituencies
slide107

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Engaging the stakeholder in discussion

Briefly relate the facts as you understand them without making a recommendation (in most cases)

slide108

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Engaging the stakeholder in discussion

Listen to every word, take notes

Resist the temptation to prepare rebuttals while the other person is talking

slide109

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Principles

Your best carefully planned strategy will be inadequate; all strategies miss critical information in the beginning which will impact success

Bad assumptions can be self-fulfilling

One or more of your best assumptions will be incorrect and will limit the solutions

slide110

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Principles

Bad assumptions can be self-fulfilling

One or more of your best assumptions will be incorrect and will limit the solutions

slide111

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Principles

No one will listen to your opinion until you have demonstrated you understand theirs

slide112

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Principles

Discussions are easier when trust is present

Trust is based on both character and competence

slide113

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Tactics

Do not allow the stakeholder to state their position on the issue being discussed. Why?

Your conversation should target getting the stakeholder on your side of the issue against the problem, not face-to-face against each other.

slide114

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Tactics

People with clout tend to decide quickly, announce their decision, then defend it (DAD)

You are not among that group (unless you are among the highest-ranking or financially independent) Your tactic and target will be reaching as close to a full consensus among stakeholders as possible

slide115

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Tactics

Seek fairness

Make honest commitments

slide116

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Tactics

Action is preferable to inaction—

The other side has to believe that an imperfect solution implemented now is better than waiting for a perfect solution

If this is not the case—

Your approach should be to reshape their perception. Offer additional facts and consequences to not acting now

slide117

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Deadlocks

slide118

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Deadlocks

slide119

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

Deadlocks

slide120

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

What to do with incompatible positions:

Foster a productive atmosphere, not adversarial

Did you try to shove them from their position to yours instead of building from their interests?

Listen, learn, probe

slide121

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

What to do with incompatible positions (continued):

Realize that you do not understand the other person’s deeper interests; shift the conversation to brainstorming the other party’s FULL set of interests potentially at stake.

Be patient. Remember that successful resolution of conflicts develops trust between parties.

slide122

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

Influencing through Negotiation

What to do with incompatible positions (continued):

Improve communication and frequency to foster creativity

Listen and learn, then focus on a style that is empathetic and assertive

Express your confidence that the parties can find a suitable solution

slide123

Managing Stakeholder Expectations

What an old trial lawyer

taught me:

objective business culture segment
Objective: Business Culture Segment
  • To identify business cultures in your organization
  • Create strategies to manage their impact on you and your organization
four common cultures
Four Common Cultures
  • Collaboration
  • Cultivation
  • Control
  • Competence
collaboration1
Collaboration
  • Customer is king
  • Proactive response focuses on the customer
examples
Examples:
  • Nordstrom
  • Brigham Young University
cultivation1
Cultivation
  • Hire the best; keep the best
  • Focuses on keeping employees happy
slide133
Note:The dominant culture is owned by the leaderEvery organization has sub-cultures with their own leaders
examples1
Examples:
  • Hewlett Packard

Subculture examples:

  • Oracle
  • Google
control1
Control
  • Very efficient
  • Worries about total cost of ownership
  • Makes money or reduces cost based on efficient processes
example
Example:
  • Wal-Mart
  • Toyota
competence1
Competence
  • Builds the best
  • Tells customers what they want
examples2
Examples:
  • John Deere
  • Mercedes
individual think time
Individual Think Time
  • Draw a pie chart which represents how the four culture types (dominant and sub-dominant) impact your organization
group think time
Group Think Time
  • What strategies should you employ to work with the dominant culture?
  • How do you have to adjust?
slide145

Conclusion of Day One

Enjoy your evening!

naep procurement academy tier iii senior professional day 2

NAEP Procurement AcademyTier III: Senior ProfessionalDay 2

Andy Brantley, CEO - CUPA-HR

Robert Haverkamp, Esq. – The Ohio State University (retired)

Ray Jensen, C.P.M. – Arizona State University

Craig Passey, C.P.M. – Brigham Young University

slide147

Understanding Higher EducationAndy Brantley, President and CEOCollege and University Professional Association for Human Resources (CUPA-HR)abrantley@cupahr.org

agenda
Agenda
  • What makes working in higher education appealing?
  • What is different about higher education?
  • Why does higher education exist?
  • Higher education structures and governance models
  • What is “shared governance”?
  • Higher ed revenue sources and funding issues
  • Q&A
introductions
Introductions
  • Name, institution, role
  • How long have you been in higher education?
  • Prior industries?
  • Why did you move to higher education?
  • What do you observe to be different in higher education?
  • What do you enjoy?
  • What is frustrating?
  • What do you not understand?
higher ed characteristics
Higher Ed Characteristics
  • Multiple stakeholders
  • Process oriented
  • More accountability (public sector especially)
  • Board/trustees not compensated
  • Rule/policy/report intense
  • Less focus on bottom line (traditionally)
  • Risk adverse
  • Vertical organizations (silos)
  • Culture of ideas and debate
  • No stock options or profit-sharing
  • Staff salaries may be lower
  • Benefits often richer
  • Stability (traditionally)
  • Slow to change
  • Traditions matter
  • Committees for everything
  • Little top down decision-making
  • Shared governance
slide151

Something Tells Us Choosing the Mascot

Will Be the Easy Part

  • In response to declining resources and an interest in administrative streamlining, a proposal has been advanced to merge three entities: a well regarded, but financially struggling private medical school; a mid-tier public research university; and a community college that barely survived last year’s accreditation review. Each institution has a different governing board.
    • Who are the stakeholders?
    • What are the advantages and disadvantages to such a proposal?
    • Who might try to sabotage this effort and why?
    • Who stands to benefit and why?
    • Who stands to lose and why?
    • What will be the most complicated aspects of this merger?
slide153

In the 1940’s, the President’s Commission on Higher Education for democracy stated that higher education exists to:

  • Provide for greater democracy
  • Increase international cooperation and understanding
  • Apply “creative imagination and trained intelligence to the social problems and administration of public affairs.”
slide154

“Colleges and universities perform a dozen or so functions for society including educating students, investigating the nature of the world and of man, conserving the heritage of the race in libraries and museums, screening out those unfit for the more difficult occupations, criticizing society and its practices, acclaiming worthy individuals by means of honorary degrees, providing havens for creative individuals.”

W.H. Cowley. “The Purpose and Heritage of Higher Education. Improving College and University Teaching, Vol 3, No. 2 (1955), pp. 27-31.

slide155

“A University anywhere can aim no higher than to be British as possible for the sake of undergraduates, as German as possible for the sake of the graduates and research personnel, as American as possible for the sake of the public at large – and as confused as possible for the sake of the preservation of the whole uneasy balance.”

Clark Kerr (President of University of California at Berkeley)

The Uses of the University, 1963.

some purposes of higher education
Some Purposes of Higher Education
  • Create an educated citizenry
  • Career preparation
  • Economic development
  • Creation of new knowledge
  • Solve societal problems
  • Enhance quality of life
  • Further aims of democracy
  • Knowledge for the sake of knowledge
types of institutions
Types of Institutions
  • Public vs. private
  • Proprietary vs. non-profit
  • Secular vs. religious
  • Community colleges
  • Bachelor degrees granting institutions
  • Master’s degree granting institutions
  • Doctoral degree granting institutions
  • Special focus institutions (divinity, schools of law)
  • Tribal colleges
  • Land-grant, sea-grant
  • Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HCBUs)
  • Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSI)
  • Native American Non-Tribal Serving Institutions
  • Asian American and Pacific Islander Serving Institutions
governance
Governance
  • Trustees
  • Regents
  • Governors
  • Elected vs. Appointed
faculty characteristics
Faculty Characteristics
  • Mavericks
  • Independent
  • Flexible work schedules
  • “Not a career; a lifestyle”
  • Less tolerant of red tape
  • Challenge one another (debate for sport)
  • Promoted for teaching, research, service
  • “Free agents” vs. “employees”
  • Loyalty to discipline over institution
  • Demands for evidence
  • May engage in outside consulting (how much is too much?)
  • Some think staff work is less important
  • Discipline pecking order
  • Liberal?
the faculty career trajectory
The Faculty Career Trajectory
  • Terminal degree
  • Evidence of independent scholarship
  • Post doctoral fellowships (post docs)
  • Tenure track vs. Non-tenure track
  • Tenure process
  • Moving from Associate Professor to Full Professor
  • Terminal associate professors
titles
Titles

Chancellor vs. President

Academic Titles

Provost

Dean

Academic chair /

Department head

Endowed chairs

Distinguished professor

Emeritus professors

(Full) Professor

Associate professor

Assistant professor

Instructor

Lecturer

Adjunct faculty member

Visiting scholar

Postdoctoral fellows/scholars

Graduate assistants /

teaching assistants

what is shared governance and why should you care
What Is Shared Governance and Why Should You Care?
  • Faculty Senates
  • Staff / professional employee councils
  • Academic policy oversight
  • Curriculum/degree decisions
  • Conditions of employment
  • Notion that institutions “are their faculty”
  • “The Academy”
  • Politics and power bases
  • Strategies for achieving buy-in
other academic issues
Other Academic Issues
  • Rotating vs. long-term academic department chairs
  • What is academic freedom?
  • Move away from tenured or tenure track positions(adjuncts and instructors)
  • What matters more: teaching or research?
  • Challenges of student evaluations
  • What to do with faculty who don’t want to teach?
  • Why are faculty reluctant to retire?
  • What is a reasonable teaching load?
  • What is post-tenure review?
slide173

“University politics are vicious precisely because the stakes are so small.”

- Henry A. Kissinger

exercise
Exercise

Dissatisfied with your college’s U.S. News & World Report rankings, your president has proposed increasing admission standards. “There is a direct correlation between GPAs, SAT scores and graduation rates. If we become more selective, we can improve our 4-year graduation rates and thereby move up in national rankings.”

What are the pros and cons of such a plan? What areas will be affected and how?

higher education funding
Higher Education Funding

Revenue Sources

  • Tuition and fees
  • State appropriations
  • Federal grants (NIH, NSF, DOD, etc.)
  • Private foundation grants (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, other examples)
  • Donations
  • Alumni giving
  • Athletic ticket revenue
  • Revenue bonds
  • Endowment income
pima community college arizona
Pima Community College (Arizona)

All Funds Budgeted Revenue Sources as a Percent of Total Budgeted Revenue FY1998-2010

emerging issues in higher education
Emerging Issues in Higher Education
  • HEPI
  • Why are higher ed costs increasing so much?
  • Distance education
  • Global competition
  • Declining availability of U.S. produced Ph.D.’s
  • Athletics scrutiny
  • Benefits portability
  • Gender diversity among faculty
  • Emerging role of community colleges in helping adults to “retool”
  • Remedial education
  • Community colleges as feeder schools (articulation agreements)
  • Need for a higher education “business model”
  • Higher education as a private good rather than a public good
the chronicle of higher education challenges for higher education in 2011
The Chronicle of Higher Education

Challenges for Higher Education in 2011

is the bubble bursting the challenges ahead
Is The Bubble Bursting? The Challenges Ahead
  • Price-sensitive students and families. What are we paying for? Quality. Job-placement.
  • Reduced role for federal/state governments?
    • Growth in Pell Grant paid for by move to direct lending
    • State budgets in trouble
    • Possibly more federal/state government regulations
  • Rise of Alternative Models of Education
    • Online/Hybrid
    • For-profit
    • 3-year degrees
contact
Contact

Andy Brantley

President and CEO

College and University Professional Association for Human Resources

CUPA-HR

1811 Commons Point Drive

Knoxville, TN 37932

abrantley@cupahr.org

(865) 637-7673

supervision and management of the higher education workforce

Supervision and Management of the Higher Education Workforce

Andy Brantley

President and CEO

CUPA-HR

abrantley@cupahr.org

discussion topics
Discussion topics
  • Setting the stage
  • The changing higher ed employee contract
  • Management of the higher ed workforce during ongoing uncertainty
  • Embracing the past and preparing for the future
  • Key legislative and regulatory workforce issues
  • Real solutions and recommendations
setting the stage
Setting the stage

“Most of us feel that historical change is happening now…most believe our universities will look different, maybe very different, in 10 years. To most it is a question of whether we will work to shape the future or if the future will shape us.”

- Peter McPherson

President APLU

setting the stage1
Setting the stage

“We’ve had a fantastic 70-year run since the huge investment in higher education in the middle of the 20th century…but it has run its course. We have to stop making the standard case.”

- Michael Crow

President Arizona State University

setting the stage2
Setting the stage

“Reality may be slowly setting in that the outlook for higher education is irrevocably changed…different forever, or at least for the foreseeable future.”

- Jamie Merisotis

Lumina Foundation

setting the stage3
Setting the stage

“It’s time to develop a higher education workforce that not only meets current needs but pushes higher education into the future.”

- Andy Brantley

CUPA-HR

employment contract has to change
Employment contract has to change

The Department of Labor predicts fewer workers in almost 1/4 of 750 occupations it tracks as total NUMBER of jobs increases!

employment contract has to change1
Employment contract has to change
  • What are the job growth areas on campus?
  • What types of positions do you expect to decrease during the next 5 years?
slide200

Guidance item #1…Workforce needs are changing. We must be able to quickly see the need for change and make necessary adjustments.

employment contract has to change2
Employment contract has to change
  • Ongoing growth and learning a requirement for all employees
  • Organization structure must enable the institution to grow stronger
employment contract has to change3
Employment contract has to change

Ongoing growth and learning as a requirement for all employees vs. succession planning

employment contract has to change4
Employment contract has to change
  • What makes the work of my organization relevant right now?
  • What about my organization needs to change to ensure we are relevant 5 years from now?
slide204

Guidance item #2… The talent and capabilities in our organization must meet our current needs AND position us for the future. When talent and capabilities in the organization cannot prepare us for what is next, we have to bring it in and/or make necessary adjustments.

terms and conditions of employment
Terms and Conditions of Employment
  • Staff / faculty / administrators
  • Academic vs. Fiscal year contracts
  • Who gets contracts?
  • Who can be released? When and for what reasons? Severance?
  • Salary supplements
  • Perquisites (houses, cars, country club memberships)
management of the higher ed workforce
Management of the higher ed workforce
  • What you see shapes how you change…practicevujadé
  • Where you look shapes what you see
slide209

Management of the higher ed workforce

  • Success is not just about thinking differently from the competition
  • Become a problem finder
embracing the past and preparing for the future
Embracing the past and preparing for the future
  • There’s nothing wrong with your organization that can’t be fixed by what’s right with your organization
  • The past does not limit or prescribe the future
slide212

Embracing the past and preparing for the future

  • As you think about your current institution, what are some of the things from the past that are bogging the institution down?
  • What are some examples of “tearing out the rearview mirror” that need review?
slide213

Guidance item #5… Use history as a source of strength but not as a prescription of who you need to be in the future.

key legislative and regulatory compliance issues
Key legislative and regulatory compliance issues
  • Your institution’s HR policies and procedures
  • New / emerging legislative and regulatory compliance issues
real solutions and recommendations
Real solutions and recommendations

“Another load of services does not change the business model.”

- Jac Fitz-enz

Human Capital Source

real solutions and recommendations1
Real solutions and recommendations
  • Fab 5
  • Social network for displaced workers
real solutions and recommendations2
Real solutions and recommendations
  • The US Army’s wiki project
  • Monthly employee dialog sessions
  • New to Veteran Forums
slide219

Guidance item #7… This ain’t rocket science.

  • Sometimes revolutionary change is needed.
  • Sometimes small changes make a big difference.
  • Sometimes many small changes made over a period of time create revolutionary change.
summary comments
Summary comments
  • The higher ed employee contract is changing.
  • Ongoing learning needs to be required for every employee.
  • Acknowledge the past while charging into the future.
  • Supervisors have huge impact on morale and engagement of their employees.
  • Do less with less.
  • Constantly question the relevance and value of functions of all employees in your areas of responsibility.
key resources
Key Resources
  • Best Companies for Leadership study, Hay Group 2010
  • Practically Radical, William C. Taylor, January 2011
  • Enterprise Learning and Talent Manager 2011: Predictions for the Coming Year—Building a Borderless Workplace, November 2010, Bersin and Associates Research Report
  • Best HR Ideas for 2010, Human Resource Executive magazine
  • CUPA-HR 2010 Economic Issues Survey report
  • CUPA-HR 2010 Administrative Compensation Survey and CUPA-HR 2010 National Faculty Salary Survey
  • Is Higher Ed Ready to Change? Inside Higher Ed, November 17, 2010
  • The changing face of American jobs, USA Today, January 13, 2011
  • Business Today Demands a Comprehensive Talent Strategy. Can HR Deliver? Emilie Petrone and Gabriella D. Kilby, Korn/Ferry Institute, 2010
slide222

Lunch

Break

slide223

Procurement Trends

Panel Discussion

slide224

Legal Aspects of Procurement

What We Will Cover

  • Recap of Contract Law
  • Contract and Signature Authority
  • Relationship with Legal Counsel
    • Q & A
  • Break
  • Development of Purchasing Policies
  • Risk Assessment
  • Hypothetical Case Study
  • Practical Considerations
    • Q & A
slide225

Legal Aspects of Procurement

My Background

  • 38 years as senior administrator and business attorney at The Ohio State University
  • Had signature authority for University contracts
  • Developed purchasing policies for governing board approval
  • Developed numerous RFPs for major projects
  • Led negotiating team for major contracts
  • Organized and led the business law practice group
  • Provided direct and continuing legal advice regarding procurement to University administration
slide226

Legal Aspects of Procurement

My Disclaimer

This presentation is intended solely to provide educational information. It is not intended to provide legal advice, nor does it constitute legal advice, and it should not be relied upon as such.

slide227

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Recap of Contract Law

  • Common Law
  • Uniform Commercial Code
  • Administrative Regulations
slide228

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Contract Elements

  • Offer and Acceptance
  • Mutuality – “Meeting of the Minds”
  • Written (but not always)
  • Consideration (something of value by each party)
  • Legal Capacity by Each Party
  • Legal Subject Matter
  • A Contract by Any Other Name…
slide229

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Breach of Contract

  • Minor or Material Breach
  • Substantial Performance
  • Types of Damages
  • Other Remedies
slide230

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Contracting and Signature Authority

  • What is authority of the Purchasing Office?
  • Multiple purchasing departments?
  • Other contracting offices?
  • How / to whom is signature authority delegated?
  • Apparent Authority
  • Indemnification / Insurance / Representation
  • Electronic Signatures
slide231

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Relationship with Legal Counsel

  • Review of Model / Form Agreements
  • Periodic Review of Terms and Conditions
  • Review of RFPs, etc., as needed
  • Roles of Various Offices on Negotiating Teams
  • Develop Close Working Relationship
  • Legal resources available to Purchasing Office
slide232

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Questions and Answers

slide234

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Purchasing Policies

  • Development
  • Approval
  • Administration
  • Review
slide235

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Purchasing Policies – What to Include

  • Authority to Contract
      • What Authority Directly Retained by the Board
      • What Exceptions
      • Different Types of Procurement Methods
  • Delegation of Contracting Authority
      • Multiple Purchasing Offices
      • Delegation of Signature Authority
slide236

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Purchasing Policies – What to Include

  • Define reporting and review requirements
  • Define senior administrative office responsible for oversight and administration
  • Define audit requirements
  • Define ethics and conflict of interest standards and rules
slide237

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Purchasing Policies – What to Include

  • Define thresholds for requiring competitive bidding
  • Define justifications for waivers of bidding
      • Sole source
      • Emergency
      • Sufficient economic reason
      • Other categorical exclusions
  • Specify what reporting is required regarding waivers
slide238

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Purchasing Policies – Approval

  • Involvement of all stakeholders
  • Concerns of using departments
  • Concept of distributed authority with oversight and audit
  • Senior administration approval
  • Governing board approval process
slide239

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Risk Assessment

  • View from perspective of institutional leadership
  • Issues often complex
  • Often there is no single, simple correct answer
  • Risk analysis
  • Recommendations and decisions based on likelihood and severity of various risks
slide240

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Hypothetical Case Study

slide241

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Practical Considerations

  • Differences between Private and Public Institutions
      • Indemnification
      • Non-appropriation of funds
      • Non-discrimination
      • Audit
      • Apparent authority
slide242

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Practical Considerations

  • Boilerplate terms and conditions and standard RFP language
  • Model agreements
  • Review policies and governing board resolutions
  • Review process and documentation for delegations of authority
      • Audit
      • Apparent authority
slide243

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Practical Considerations

  • Ensure there is a primary contact in each vice presidential area
  • Ensure periodic refresher training on ethics and conflicts of interest
slide244

Legal Aspects of Procurement

Questions and Answers