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Comprehensive Health Education
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  1. Comprehensive Health Education • What is the goal of Comprehensive Health Education? • 2012 Florida Statutes • Health Education 2008 Next Generation Sunshine State Standards link • State Course Description link • LCSD Academic Plan link • 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) link • LCSD Elementary and Middle School Health Education policy and data

  2. What is the goal ofComprehensive Health Education? • To empower students to develop Health literacy, which is the capacity of individuals to obtain, interpret, and understand basic health information and services, and the competence to use such information and services in ways which enhance health. • Health education gives students the knowledge and skills to thrive physically, mentally, emotionally, and socially. This knowledge helps students meet the challenges of growing up by giving them the life tools to become physically and intellectually healthy individuals.

  3. 2012 Florida Statutes • Title XLVIII; Chapter 1003; Part IV; 1003.42 – Required Instruction • (j) The true effects of all alcoholic and intoxicating liquors and beverages and narcotics upon the human body and mind. • (n) Comprehensive health education that addresses concepts of community health; consumer health; environmental health; family life, including an awareness of the benefits of sexual abstinence as the expected standard and the consequences of teenage pregnancy; mental and emotional health; injury prevention and safety; Internet safety; nutrition; personal health; prevention and control of disease; and substance use and abuse. The health education curriculum for students in grades 7 through 12 shall include a teen dating violence and abuse component that includes, but is not limited to, the definition of dating violence and abuse, the warning signs of dating violence and abusive behavior, the characteristics of healthy relationships, measures to prevent and stop dating violence and abuse, and community resources available to victims of dating violence and abuse. • The State Board of Education is encouraged to adopt standards and pursue assessment of the requirements of this subsection. • (3) Any student whose parent makes written request to the school principal shall be exempted from the teaching of reproductive health or any disease, including HIV/AIDS, its symptoms, development, and treatment. A student so exempted may not be penalized by reason of that exemption. Course descriptions for comprehensive health education shall not interfere with the local determination of appropriate curriculum which reflects local values and concerns. • 1003.42 Required instruction.— • http://www.flsenate.gov/Laws/Statutes/2012/1003.42

  4. 2012 Florida Statutes • 1003.46 Health education; instruction in acquired immune deficiency syndrome.— • (1) Each district school board may provide instruction in acquired immune deficiency syndrome education as a specific area of health education. Such instruction may include, but is not limited to, the known modes of transmission, signs and symptoms, risk factors associated with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and means used to control the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The instruction shall be appropriate for the grade and age of the student and shall reflect current theory, knowledge, and practice regarding acquired immune deficiency syndrome and its prevention. • (2) Throughout instruction in acquired immune deficiency syndrome, sexually transmitted diseases, or health education, when such instruction and course material contains instruction in human sexuality, a school shall: • (a) Teach abstinence from sexual activity outside of marriage as the expected standard for all school-age students while teaching the benefits of monogamous heterosexual marriage. • (b) Emphasize that abstinence from sexual activity is a certain way to avoid out-of-wedlock pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, including acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and other associated health problems. • (c) Teach that each student has the power to control personal behavior and encourage students to base actions on reasoning, self-esteem, and respect for others. • (d) Provide instruction and material that is appropriate for the grade and age of the student. • History.—s. 139, ch. 2002-387. • 1003.46 Health education; instruction in acquired immune deficiency syndrome.—http://www.flsenate.gov/Laws/Statutes/2012/1003.46

  5. 2012 Florida Statutes • 1003.453 School wellness and physical education policies; nutrition guidelines.— • (1) Each school district shall submit to the Department of Education a copy of its school wellness policy as required by the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 and a copy of its physical education policy required under s. 1003.455. Each school district shall annually review its school wellness policy and physical education policy and provide a procedure for public input and revisions. In addition, each school district shall send an updated copy of its wellness policy and physical education policy to the department and to the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services when a change or revision is made. • (2) The department shall post links to each school district’s school wellness policy and physical education policy on its website so that the policies can be accessed and reviewed by the public. Each school district shall provide the most current versions of its school wellness policy and physical education policy on the district’s website. • (3) The department must provide on its website links to resources that include information regarding: • (a) Classroom instruction on the benefits of exercise and healthful eating. • (b) Classroom instruction on the health hazards of using tobacco and being exposed to tobacco smoke. • (c) The eight components of a coordinated school health program, including health education, physical education, health services, and nutrition services. • (d) The core measures for school health and wellness, such as the School Health Index. • (e) Access for each student to the nutritional content of foods and beverages and to healthful food choices in accordance with the dietary guidelines of the United States Department of Agriculture. This information shall also be accessible from the website of the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. • (f) Multiple examples of school wellness policies for school districts. • (g) Examples of wellness classes that provide nutrition education for teachers and school support staff, including encouragement to provide classes that are taught by a licensed nutrition professional from the school nutrition department. • (4) School districts are encouraged to provide basic training in first aid, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, for all students, beginning in grade 6 and every 2 years thereafter. Private and public partnerships for providing training or necessary funding are encouraged. • History.—s. 18, ch. 2006-301; s. 8, ch. 2011-217. • 1003.453 School wellness and physical education policies; nutrition guidelines.—http://www.flsenate.gov/Laws/Statutes/2012/1003.453

  6. 2012 Florida Statutes • F.S. 1003.4281003.428 General requirements for high school graduation; revised.— • 6. One credit in physical education to include integration of health. Participation in an interscholastic sport at the junior varsity or varsity level for two full seasons shall satisfy the one-credit requirement in physical education if the student passes a competency test on personal fitness with a score of “C” or better. The competency test on personal fitness must be developed by the Department of Education. A district school board may not require that the one credit in physical education be taken during the 9th grade year. Completion of one semester with a grade of “C” or better in a marching band class, in a physical activity class that requires participation in marching band activities as an extracurricular activity, or in a dance class shall satisfy one-half credit in physical education or one-half credit in performing arts. This credit may not be used to satisfy the personal fitness requirement or the requirement for adaptive physical education under an individual education plan (IEP) or 504 plan. Completion of 2 years in a Reserve Officer Training Corps (R.O.T.C.) class, a significant component of which is drills, shall satisfy the one-credit requirement in physical education and the one-credit requirement in performing arts. This credit may not be used to satisfy the personal fitness requirement or the requirement for adaptive physical education under an individual education plan (IEP) or 504 plan. • http://www.flsenate.gov/Laws/Statutes/2012/1003.428

  7. Important Links • Health Education 2008 Next Generation Sunshine State Standards Select “NGSSS: Health Education” under subject area. Scroll down and select “Export to Word” for a complete listing • http://www.cpalms.org/Standards/FLStandardSearch.aspx • State Course Descriptions - type keyword "Health“ • http://www.floridastandards.org/Courses/CourseDescriptionSearch.aspx • Lee County School District Academic Plans Type “Health” in Lookup A Course search box to view Kindergarten through Grade 8 plans. (Elementary plans: labeled K, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Middle plans: MJ Health 4, 5 and 6 are grades 6, 7 and 8, respectively. High School plans: HOPE and HOPE with physical education variation) • http://acadplan.leeschools.net/Forms/index.htm

  8. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) • The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) monitors six types of health-risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death and disability among youth and adults, including— • Behaviors that contribute to unintentional injuries and violence • Sexual behaviors that contribute to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV infection • Alcohol and other drug use • Tobacco use • Unhealthy dietary behaviors • Inadequate physical activity • YRBSS also measures the prevalence of obesity and asthma among youth and young adults. • YRBSS includes a national school-based survey conducted by CDC and state, territorial, tribal, and local surveys conducted by state, territorial, and local education and health agencies and tribal governments. • http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/youthonline/App/Results.aspx?TT=A&OUT=0&SID=HS&QID=QQ&LID=FL&YID=2011&LID2=&YID2=&COL=S&ROW1=&ROW2=&HT=QQ&LCT=&FS=&FR=1&FG=1&FSL=&FRL=&FGL=&PV=&TST=False&C1=&C2=&QP=G&DP=1&VA=CI&CS=Y&SYID=&EYID=&SC=DEFAULT&SO=ASC

  9. Highlights of 2011 Florida High School YRBS * Only High School Students (grades 9-12) surveyed • 89.7 % didn’t wear bicycle helmets (during the previous 12 months) • 24 % rode with a driver who had been drinking alcohol (during the previous 30 days) • 25.7 % felt sad or hopeless (for two or more weeks in a row during the previous 12 months) • 12.1 % seriously considered attempting suicide (during the previous 12 months) • 28 % were in a physical fight one or more times (during the previous 12 months) • 9.2 % smoked their first cigarette before age 13and • 14.3 % smoked on at least one day (during the previous 30 days) • 19.5 % drank alcohol for the first time before age 13and • 37 % had at least one drink of alcohol on at least one day (during the previous 30 days) • 39.1 % had ever used marijuana one or more times and • 22.5% had used marijuana one or more times (during the previous 30 days) • 15% had ever taken prescription drugs one or more times without a doctor’s prescription • 48.2 % had ever had sexual intercourse • 7.6 % had sexual intercourse for the first time before age 13 • 34 % had sexual intercourse (during the previous 3 months) • 15.5% were never taught in school about AIDS or HIV infection (which is part of the HOPE curriculum in high school) • 76.3 % ate fruit or drank 100% fruit juice less than three times per day (during the previous 7 days) and • 6.1 % did not eat fruit or drink 100% fruit juice at all • 85.1 % ate vegetables less than three times per day (during the previous 7 days) and • 8.1 % did not eat vegetables at all • 13.6 % of students were overweight • 11.5 % were obese • = 25.1 % of students were overweight or obese

  10. Elementary Comprehensive Health Education As of the 2012-2013 Academic Year there is No LCSD policy on Comprehensive Health Education instruction at the Elementary Level.

  11. Middle School Comprehensive Health Education As of the 2012-2013 Academic Year there is No LCSD policy on Comprehensive Health Education instruction at the Middle School Level.

  12. LCSD Middle School Total # of students LCSD Middle Schools offering Comprehensive Health Education With student count 413 out of 13,820 Currently , less than 3% of LCSD Middle School students are enrolled In Comprehensive Health Education.

  13. “When health is absent, wisdom cannot reveal itself, art cannot manifest, strength cannot fight, wealth becomes useless, and intelligence cannot be applied.” Herophilus