assessment in the music classroom depaul university n.
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  1. Assessment in the Music Classroom DePaul University Aileen Miracle aileen.miracle@yahoo.com

  2. What is Summative Assessment?

  3. What is Summative Assessment? • Assessment OF learning

  4. What is Summative Assessment? • Assessment OF learning • Assessment used by the teacher to grade

  5. What is Formative Assessment?

  6. What is Formative Assessment? • Assessment FOR learning

  7. What is Formative Assessment? • Assessment FOR learning • Assessment used by the teacher not to grade, but to gauge students’ understanding of concept

  8. Summative vs. Formative

  9. Summative vs. Formative Example of summative only gradebook

  10. Summative vs. Formative Example of formative and summative gradebook Example of formative and summative gradebook

  11. Why assess?

  12. Why assess? • To obtain evidence of musical growth and progress

  13. Why assess? • To obtain evidence of musical growth and progress • To guide instruction and choice of teaching strategies

  14. Why assess? • To obtain evidence of musical growth and progress • To guide instruction and choice of teaching strategies • To help validate the music program

  15. Why assess? • To obtain evidence of musical growth and progress • To guide instruction and choice of teaching strategies • To help validate the music program • To provide evidence of accountability for student learning From “Assessing the Developing Child Musician” by Brophy

  16. Video #1: Popsicle Sticks Video #2: Rhythm manipulatives Video #3: Solfa manipulatives Video #4: Fruit composition activity on SMART Board Video #5: Fruit composition in groups

  17. Formative and Summative Assessments

  18. Formative and Summative Assessments • Singing

  19. Formative and Summative Assessments • Singing • Manipulatives

  20. Formative and Summative Assessments • Singing • Manipulatives • Pre-Test/ Post-Test

  21. Formative and Summative Assessments • Singing • Manipulatives • Pre-Test/ Post-Test • Voting

  22. Formative and Summative Assessments • Singing • Manipulatives • Pre-Test/ Post-Test • Voting

  23. Other Ways of Assessing

  24. Other Ways of Assessing • Dry erase boards for rhythmic writing

  25. Other Ways of Assessing • Dry erase boards for rhythmic writing • Staff dry erase boards for note writing

  26. Other Ways of Assessing • Dry erase boards for rhythmic writing • Staff dry erase boards for note writing • Staves and chips

  27. Other Ways of Assessing • Dry erase boards for rhythmic writing • Staff dry erase boards for note writing • Staves and chips • Playing instruments

  28. Other Ways of Assessing • Dry erase boards for rhythmic writing • Staff dry erase boards for note writing • Staves and chips • Playing instruments • Student response systems

  29. Other Ways of Assessing • Dry erase boards for rhythmic writing • Staff dry erase boards for note writing • Staves and chips • Playing instruments • Student response systems • Worksheets

  30. Other Ways of Assessing • Dry erase boards for rhythmic writing • Staff dry erase boards for note writing • Staves and chips • Playing instruments • Student response systems • Worksheets • Beat and rhythm charts

  31. Other Ways of Assessing • Dry erase boards for rhythmic writing • Staff dry erase boards for note writing • Staves and chips • Playing instruments • Student response systems • Worksheets • Beat and rhythm charts • Solfa Cups

  32. Other Ways of Assessing • Dry erase boards for rhythmic writing • Staff dry erase boards for note writing • Staves and chips • Playing instruments • Student response systems • Worksheets • Beat and rhythm charts • Solfa Cups • Other ideas?

  33. Types of Assessments

  34. Types of Assessments • Knowledge: Students identify facts/ concepts

  35. Types of Assessments • Knowledge: Students identify facts/ concepts

  36. Types of Assessments • Knowledge: Students identify facts/ concepts • Performance: Students demonstrate

  37. Types of Assessments • Knowledge: Students identify facts/ concepts • Performance: Students demonstrate • Reasoning: Students reason or problem solve

  38. Types of Assessments • Knowledge: Students identify facts/ concepts • Performance: Students demonstrate • Reasoning: Students reason or problem solve • Product: Students create

  39. Types of Assessments • Knowledge: Students identify facts/ concepts • Performance: Students demonstrate • Reasoning: Students reason or problem solve • Product: Students create

  40. Example of Performance Assessment

  41. Creating a rubric

  42. Creating a rubric • Decide what you want to assess

  43. Creating a rubric • Decide what you want to assess • Decide what mastery looks like, then build your rubric from that

  44. Creating a rubric • Decide what you want to assess • Decide what mastery looks like, then build your rubric from that • Could keep in mind: 4: No mistakes 3: Very few mistakes 2: Students can achieve task, but need assistance 1: Students cannot achieve task, even with assistance

  45. Rubric for melodic dictation:

  46. Rubric for creating patterns:

  47. Before moving onto Q, students should be able to: • Read patterns with sd and q

  48. Before moving onto Q, students should be able to: • Read patterns with sdand q • Write patterns with sd and q

  49. Before moving onto Q, students should be able to: • Read patterns with sdand q • Write patterns with sd and q • Figure out form for songs with sd and q