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EASA & UAS AIRWORTHINESS POLICY PowerPoint Presentation
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EASA & UAS AIRWORTHINESS POLICY

EASA & UAS AIRWORTHINESS POLICY

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EASA & UAS AIRWORTHINESS POLICY

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  1. EASA & UAS AIRWORTHINESS POLICY David Haddon david.haddon@easa.europa.eu

  2. Contents • Part 1: EASA • What is EASA? • Civil/Military Co-operation • Part 2:Civil Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) • Civil UAS Experience • Overview of UAS Airworthiness Policy • On-going activities • Summary

  3. What is EASA? • EASA is a European Union Agency • Established by regulation (EC) 1592/2002: • Defines clear sharing of roles between EASA, the Member States and the European Commission • Establishes basic principles for civil aviation safety and essential requirements • Limited to airworthiness and Environmental protection • Scope subsequently extended by regulation (EC) 216/2008 to cover operations, pilot licensing and 3rd country operators. • Will be extended further (2010?) to cover aerodromes and ATM/ANS

  4. EASA Facts & Figures • Location: • Originally located in Brussels • Seat is Cologne since 03 November 2004 • Staffing: • 1 - September 2003; • 100 - end of 2004; • 185 - end of 2005; • 450? - end 2009

  5. EASA Objectives & Role Principal Objective: • To establish and maintain high uniform levels of civil aviation safety in Europe Role: • Rulemaking • Certification • Standardisation • Centre of expertise within EU • International relations

  6. Civil/Military Co-operation Regulation (EC) 216/2008 Article 1 Scope “1. … 2. This Regulation shall not apply when products, parts, appliances, personnel and organisations referred to in paragraph 1 are engaged in military, customs, police, or similar services. The Member States shall undertake to ensure that such services have due regard as far as practicable to the objectives of this Regulation.”

  7. Civil/Military Co-operation Examples of Civil/Military co-operation: • Informal advice and participation in meetings • Mutual exchange of Continued airworthiness information for dual use aircraft (e.g. helicopters) • A400M civil certification • Recognition that expertise residing in the military may cross into the civil world (e.g. UAS) EASA would welcome further co-ordination with military aviation authorities

  8. Part 2 Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) EASA Airworthiness Policy

  9. Civil UAS Experience • Initial expectation that civil UAS would explode onto the civil market has yet to materialise • Many small UAS (<150kg) operating under exemptions granted by NAAs • FAA grant about 100 Certificates of Authorization (COA) per year to governmental agencies, mostly (80-85%) are to small UAS primarily used for law enforcement. • Currently 3 UAS applications for EASA type-certification (1 each for helicopter, aeroplane and airship)

  10. The Civil UAS Market Source: European Commission - ENTR/2007/065. Study Analysing the Current Activities in the Field of UAV. Frost & Sullivan, 10th November 2008

  11. UAS Airworthiness Policy • Derived from earlier work done by the JAA/EUROCONTROL UAV Task Force & A-NPA 16/2005 • Establishes general principles for type-certification • Provides guidance to Part 21 • UAS Definition • Policy Scope (in line with Regulation 216/2008) • Not military or state a/c (Article 1) • Not research or experimental a/c (Annex II (b) • Not ex-military (Annex II (d)) • Not below 150 kg (Annex II (i))

  12. Policy Objectives • To facilitate the acceptance of UAS for civil applications while upholding the Agency’s given objectives in the Basic Regulation. • A civil UAS must not increase the risk to people or property on the ground compared with manned aircraft of equivalent category. • Airworthiness standards should not penalise UAS by requiring compliance with higher standards simply because technology permits.

  13. Certification Procedures Part 21 applies • Existing procedures for manned a/c apply • Normal approach (DOA/POA, TC, CofA, Part M) • Alternative Approach • Allowed under 216/2008 Article 5 4(b) • Provides a step-by-step approach • Deviations from ER must be compensated for by operational restrictions. • Leads to Restricted TC and/or Restricted CofA • Specific certification specs. or safety case

  14. Guidance to Part 21 21A.14: Demonstration of Capability • DOA • APDOA for very light UAS (CS-VLA,CS-VLR) 21A.16B: Special Conditions • Emergency recovery Capability • Communication Link • Level of Autonomy • Human machine Interface • Ground Control Station • System Safety Analysis • Due to type of operation

  15. Guidance to Part 21 21A.17: Type Certification basis Consists of: • Base CS(s) chosen from KE and equivalence with manned a/c • Tailoring of CS • SC (including System safety Analysis) Accept compliance with USAR v3 & STANAG 4671, provided: • base CS is not above CS-23 and • appropriate system safety objectives are used

  16. Issues still to be developed Airworthiness • APDOA • System Safety Analysis & Targets • Sense & Avoid(once criteria is defined) New EASA responsibilities to be included: • Ops & Lic. (including FDR/CVR) • Aerodromes • ATC/ATM Prime responsibility outside EASA: • Security

  17. On-Going Activities • FAA/EASA Collaboration • Joint Authorities for Rulemaking Unmanned Systems (JARUS) • EUROCAE WG-73 / RTCA SC 203 • ICAO UAS Study group • ITU: WRC 2011 • EASA Research contract on UAS Communications • Contacts with other organisations: EDA, NATO (FINAS), NAAs, EUROCONTROL, etc.

  18. Summary • EASA is committed to developing the regulatory framework for civil UAS. • EASA is and will continue to actively contribute to this goal in cooperation with other stakeholders and regulatory bodies. • UAS will only be allowed to operate where they can show equivalent safety to manned civil a/c. • Existing civil manned aircraft rules and procedures will be used wherever practicable. • UAS are only a small (although growing) part of the EASA’s overall scope, and time/resources must be allocated proportionately

  19. THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION www.easa.europa.eu